Public Administration

https://www.uwgb.edu/public-administration/

(Bachelor of Science)

As a broad-based, interdisciplinary, social science major, Public Administration prepares students for challenging careers in public and nonprofit organizations and, if desired, further study in graduate programs. Students develop proficiency in organizational management and leadership, nonprofit management, fundraising, public policy analysis, human resources, program evaluation, policy development and implementation and budgeting. 

With a broad skill-set, graduates work in public, nonprofit, and commercial organizations in positions as program directors, policy analysts, nonprofit executives, budget specialists, governmental affairs directors in commercial businesses, and municipal leaders. Many pursue graduate studies in public administration, law, political science, nonprofit management, public policy, and public affairs.

All Public Administration majors engage in high impact, problem-focused, applied learning. This major excels in internships: students can choose from a wide array of strong internship placements in city, county and state executive offices, non-profit organizations, and emergency management settings. Students are encouraged to gain experiences through independent study, community research projects, and an other individualized work with faculty.

Students majoring in Public Administration must choose an emphasis: ​Public and Nonprofit Management or Emergency Management. Students who want to focus specifically on the nonprofit sector should consider earning the free-standing Nonprofit Management Certificate. Students pursuing an Emergency Management emphasis can obtain a free-standing ​Emergency Management Certificate, which is offered in cooperation with campus Continuing Education and Community Engagement programs.  

Please seek assistance from a faculty adviser in creating your own academic plan.

Considering a Double Major or a Major and a Minor?

Many Public Administration students choose to complete double majors in Political Science, Environmental Policy and Planning, Organizational Leadership or Urban Studies. A second major complements the Public Administration curriculum and makes students stronger candidates when seeking careers or entry into graduate programs. 

A minor in Public Administration fits well with majors in Political Science, Economics, Communication, Environmental Policy and Planning, Urban Studies, Democracy and Justice Studies, Psychology, Social Work, and many more. Please see a faculty adviser early in your academic career for advice on these options.

Students may study abroad or at other campuses in the United States through UW-Green Bay’s participation in international exchange programs and the National Student Exchange program. Travel courses are another option for obtaining academic credits and completing requirements. For more information, contact the Office of International Education at http://www.uwgb.edu/international/.

 

Major Area of Emphasis

Students must complete requirements in one of the following areas of emphasis:

  • Emergency Management
  • Public & Nonprofit Management

Minor 

Supporting Courses9
Required (choose 3 courses):
American Government and Politics
Introduction to Public Policy
Introduction to Public Administration
Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
Upper-Level Courses15
Required (choose 3 courses):
Public and Non-Profit Management
Public Policy Analysis
Public and Nonprofit Budgeting
Public and Nonprofit Program Evaluation
Electives (choose 2 courses):
Urban Politics and Policy
Environmental Politics and Policy
Regulatory Policy and Administration
Administrative Law
Public and Non-Profit Management
Human Resource and Risk Management
State and Local Government
Public Policy Analysis
Public and Nonprofit Budgeting
Fundraising and Marketing for Nonprofits
Public and Nonprofit Program Evaluation
Cost Benefit Analysis
Internship (In the subject of public administration) 1
Total Credits24

Curriculum Guide

The following is only an example of a four-year Public Administration degree program and is subject to change without notice. Students should consult a Public Administration program advisor to ensure that they have the most accurate and up-to-date information available about a particular four-year degree option.

An example: Four year plan for Public Administration Major
120 credits necessary to graduate.
Plan is a representation and categories of classes can be switched. Check with your advisor.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallCredits
POL SCI 101 American Government and Politics 3
First Year Seminar 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
PU EN AF 202 Introduction to Public Policy 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Sophomore
Fall
PU EN AF 215 Introduction to Public Administration 3
BUS ADM 220
Business Statistics
or Social Science Statistics
or Introductory Statistics
3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
ECON 203 Micro Economic Analysis 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Junior
Fall
PU EN AF 315 Public and Non-Profit Management 3
PU EN AF 344 Leadership in Organizations 3
Public Administration Upper Level Elective 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
PU EN AF 415 Public and Nonprofit Budgeting 3
PU EN AF 428 Public and Nonprofit Program Evaluation 3
Public Administration Upper Level Elective 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Senior
Fall
PU EN AF 408 Public Policy Analysis 3
PU EN AF 497 Internship 3
Public Administration Upper Level Elective 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
PU EN AF 497 Internship 3
Public Administration Upper Level Elective 3
Public Administration Upper Level Elective 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
 Total Credits120

Faculty

Ray Hutchison; Professor; Ph.D., University of Chicago

John R Stoll; Professor; Ph.D., University of Kentucky, chair*

Aaron C Weinschenk; Professor; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee*

Dana Atwood; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Western Michigan University

Alise Coen; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Delaware

Marcelo P Cruz; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of California - Los Angeles

David J Helpap; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee*

Thomas S Nesslein; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Washington - Seattle

Laurel E Phoenix; Associate Professor; Ph.D., State University of New York - College of Environmental Science and Forestry*

Lora H Warner; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University

Elizabeth E Wheat; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Western Michigan University*