English

https://www.uwgb.edu/english/

(Bachelor of Arts)

Courses in English develop students’ understanding of important works of American, English, and world literatures, give them awareness of – and appreciation for – our literary heritage, provide them with historical and theoretical perspectives, and deepen their insight into their own experience. These courses also develop students’ ability to express their ideas orally and in writing and to conduct research. The English program also offers courses in the writing of poetry and fiction, and an emphasis in creative writing.

Students enroll in English classes for a wide variety of reasons, ranging from personal growth and enrichment to preparation for a profession or career. Graduates in English have found employment in teaching, personnel work, public relations, business management, journalism, publishing, and many other fields requiring a strong liberal arts background and communication skills.

Students majoring in English often select minors in Humanistic Studies, Design Arts, or Arts Management, but may choose Human Development, Democracy and Justice Studies, or other appropriate programs. Students majoring in English who wish to teach in the secondary public schools must minor in Education.

Students seeking information on teacher certification should contact the Education Office.

Major Area of Emphasis

Students must complete requirements in one of the following areas of emphasis:

  • Creative Writing
  • English Education
  • Literature

Minor  

Supporting Courses12
Introduction to English Literature I
Literary Studies
Research and Rhetoric 1
Choose one of the following:
Introduction to Literature
Women in Literature
Introduction to Creative Writing
Introduction to English Literature II
Introduction to American Literature I
Introduction to American Literature II
Upper-Level Courses12
Shakespeare
Choose 9 additional upper-level credits. See list in English major.
Total Credits24

Curriculum Guide 

The following is only an example of a four-year English degree program and is subject to change without notice. Students should consult a English program advisor to ensure that they have the most accurate and up-to-date information available about a particular four-year degree option.

An example: Four year plan for English Major with a Literature Emphasis; Minor in Humanities
120 credits necessary to graduate.
Plan is a representation and categories of classes can be switched. Check with your advisor.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallCredits
HUM STUD 201 Introduction to the Humanities 3
WF 105 Research and Rhetoric 3
First Year Seminar 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
ENGLISH 219 World Literatures II 3
HUM STUD 101 Foundations of Western Culture I 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Sophomore
Fall
ENGLISH 214 Introduction to English Literature I 3
ENGLISH 290 Literary Studies 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Spring
ENGLISH 215 Introduction to English Literature II 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Junior
Fall
ENGLISH 216
Introduction to American Literature I
or Introduction to American Literature II
3
ENGLISH 3XX elective 3
Perspectives Classical course 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
ENGLISH 331 Major American Prose Fiction 3
Perspectives Medieval course 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Senior
Fall
ENGLISH 431 Shakespeare 3
ENGLISH 3XX elective 3
ENGLISH 3XX elective 3
HUM STUD 3XX elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Spring
ENGLISH 340 History of the English Language 3
HUM STUD 480 Humanities Seminar 3
ENGLISH 3XX elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
 Total Credits120

Faculty

Paul Emmett; Professor; Ph.D., University of Chicago

Rebecca A Meacham; Professor; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati

Charles A Rybak; Professor; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, chair

Ann Mattis; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Loyola University

Valerie Murrenus-Pilmaier; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Marquette University

Rebecca L Nesvet; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Jessica VanSlooten; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Auburn University

Jennifer Young; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University