Psychology

https://www.uwgb.edu/psychology/

(Bachelor of Science)

Psychology is the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes (e.g., memory, emotion). It seeks to explain how physiological, personal, cultural, social, developmental, and environmental conditions influence thought and action. Research aims to understand, predict, and influence behavior.

In the past century, psychology has moved from being a branch of philosophy to being both an experimental science and an active helping profession.  Likewise, psychologists work in a variety of settings where their expertise in human behavior is applied to increase efficiency, assist in product design, improve work conditions, and more. To quote the American Psychological Association, “In every conceivable setting from scientific research centers to mental healthcare services, ‘the understanding of behavior’ is the enterprise of psychologists” (www.apa.org).

A strong grasp of psychology also requires knowledge of the approach and content of considered core to the field as a whole.  Students gain this understanding by completing coursework in the primary areas of Psychology: Research Methods, Physiological/Cognitive, Social/Personality, Culture/Gender, and Clinical/Counseling. Students complete the major by choosing additional courses to meet individual needs with the help of their Professional Advisor. Students should consult with their Faculty Mentor about career planning and professional development.

The program offers special opportunities for qualified students to strengthen their professional preparation. Psychology faculty frequently work with students on collaborative research projects. Support for advanced student research is enhanced by technology in several research labs. Although all courses are taught by faculty members, undergraduate teaching assistantships allow students to master course content and receive valuable training in the teaching of psychology. Internships can be acquired in a variety of university and community settings.

Psychology helps to deepen understanding of individual and social behavior and provides a strong general background for many careers. Psychology graduates are employed in a variety of positions with their bachelor’s degree, including in social and community service, business, research, and education-related fields from after-school programs to college admissions. Because of the wide range of possibilities, students should select courses and pursue applied experiences relevant to the occupational area of greatest interest. Preparation for specialized professional work — such as testing, counseling, university teaching, consulting, and many research activities — usually requires a master’s or doctoral degree. Psychology majors have pursued graduate school in many fields, including psychology sub-disciplines such as experimental, developmental, neuroscience, industrial/organizational, social, sport, exercise, and performance psychology, clinical, counseling, and school psychology, as well as the related fields of social work, education, medicine, law, and business.

There are many different complementary minors. They vary based on individual interests and future career or educational goals, so students are encouraged to discuss options with an advisor.

Psychology Learning Outcomes

Goal 1: Knowledge Base in Psychology 
1.1 Describe key concepts, principles, and overarching themes in psychology 
1.2 Develop a working knowledge of psychology’s content domains 
1.3 Describe applications of psychology

Goal 2: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking
2.1 Use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena 
2.2 Demonstrate psychology information literacy 
2.3 Engage in innovative and integrative thinking and problem solving 
2.4 Interpret, design, and conduct basic psychological research 
2.5 Incorporate sociocultural factors in scientific inquiry 

Goal 3: Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World
3.1 Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice 
3.2 Build and enhance interpersonal relationships 
3.3 Adopt values that build community at local, national, and global levels

Goal 4: Communication
4.1 Demonstrate effective writing for different purposes 
4.2 Exhibit effective presentation skills for different purposes
4.3 Interact effectively with others 

Goal 5: Professional Development
5.1 Apply psychological content and skills to career goals 
5.2 Exhibit self-efficacy and self-regulation 
5.3 Refine project-management skills 
5.4 Enhance teamwork capacity 
5.5 Develop meaningful professional direction for life after graduation

Major

Supporting Courses13-14
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Lifespan Development
Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Processes
and Principles of Biology Lab: Cellular and Molecular Processes
Introduction to Human Biology
Choose one of the following courses:
Social Science Statistics
Business Statistics (for Business major and minors only)
Introductory Statistics
Upper-Level Courses28
Research Methods in Psychology
Core Courses
Physiological/Cognitive (choose one of the following):
Physiological Psychology
Psychology of Cognitive Processes
Social/Personality (choose one of the following):
Social Psychology
Theories of Personality
Culture/Gender (choose one of the following):
Cultural Psychology
Psychology of Women and Gender
Clinical/Counseling (choose one of the following):
Psychopathology
Counseling and Psychotherapy
Elective Courses (choose 12 credits - any Psychology Upper-Level course in the areas above not already taken or any of the following):
Drugs and Behavior
Social Cognitive Affective Neuroscience
Sport and Performance Psychology
Infancy and Early Childhood Development
Middle Childhood and Adolescent Development
Adult Development and Aging
Dying, Death, and Loss
Human Sexuality
Conservation Psychology
Environmental Psychology
Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Psychological Testing
Psychology of Emotion
Multicultural Counseling and Mental Health
Spirituality and Development
Health Psychology
Selected Topics
Capstone in Psychology
Travel Course
One (or more) of the following is encouraged, but does not count toward major requirements:
Honors in the Major
Teaching Assistantship
Project/Research Assistantship
Internship
Independent Study
Total Credits41-42

Minor

Supporting Courses9-10
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Lifespan Development
Choose one:
Social Science Statistics
Business Statistics
Introductory Statistics
Upper-Level Courses12-13
Choose any four upper-level (300 or 400 level) psychology prefix courses
Total Credits21-23

Curriculum Guide

The following is only an example of a four-year Psychology degree program and is subject to change without notice. Students should consult an advisor to ensure that they have the most accurate and up-to-date information available about a particular four-year degree option.

An example: Four year plan for Psychology Major
120 credits necessary to graduate. 
Plan is a representation and categories of classes can be switched.  Check with your advisor.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallCredits
PSYCH 102 Introduction to Psychology 3
First Year Seminar 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
HUM BIOL 102 Introduction to Human Biology 3
PSYCH 203 Introduction to Lifespan Development 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Sophomore
Fall
PSYCH 205 Social Science Statistics 4
PSYCH 3XX/4XX Psychology Upper Level Core Course 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits16
Spring
PSYCH 300 Research Methods in Psychology 4
PSYCH 3XX/4XX Psychology Upper Level Core Course 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits16
Junior
Fall
PSYCH 3XX/4XX Psychology Upper Level Core Course 3
PSYCH 3XX/4XX Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Spring
PSYCH/HUM DEV 3XX/4XX Psychology Upper Level Core Course 3
PSYCH 3XX/4XX Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Senior
Fall
PSYCH 3XX/4XX Psychology Upper Level Elective 3
PSYCH 495
Teaching Assistantship
or Project/Research Assistantship
or Internship
3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Spring
PSYCH 3XX/4XX Psychology Elective 3
PSYCH 494 Capstone in Psychology 3
PSYCH 495
Teaching Assistantship
or Project/Research Assistantship
or Internship
3
Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
 Total Credits122

Faculty 

Stacie Christian; Associate Lecturer; M.S., University of Wisconsin - Green Bay

Illene N Cupit; Professor; Ph.D., Temple University

Ryan C Martin; Professor; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi, chair

Kristin M Vespia; Professor; Ph.D., University of Iowa

Dean D VonDras; Professor; Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis

Georjeanna J Wilson-Doenges; Professor; Ph.D., University of California - Irvine

Jason Cowell; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Jenell L Holstead; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Indiana

Sawa Senzaki; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Alberta

Christine A Smith; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh