First Nations Studies

https://www.uwgb.edu/fns/

(Bachelor of Arts)

First Nations Studies reflects the holistic worldview of the indigenous people of Turtle Island (North America). First Nations Studies is committed to the study of First Nations culture, philosophy, history, language, and the social, economic, and political status of indigenous people and their communities. The program is designed to preserve and promote the identity and sovereign status of indigenous people through the study and practice of decolonization. The program places particular emphasis on the nations in our region, the Western Great Lakes.

First Nations Studies incorporates the teaching and learning approaches of tribal people, offering students a new way to learn within the academy. The program places emphasis on the oral tradition of First Nations people as preserved and shared by tribal Elders. Students take part in oral traditional learning experiences within the university classroom and, also, in tribal communities learning from tribal people. First Nations Studies teaching and learning is centered on the four areas of learning in the tribal world – history, culture, sovereignty, laws and policies, and indigenous philosophy.

The program is of interest to both American Indian and non-Indian students who wish to learn more about the traditional cultures and knowledge of indigenous people as well as the changes experienced by First Nations as a result of Euro-American contact.

The program offers a major and a minor. The minor strengthens numerous degrees including those in Business, History, Education, Social Work, Psychology, and the natural and social sciences. The degrees prepare students to live and work in an increasingly diverse community and also equip students with skills to work collaboratively and effectively with tribal governments and businesses.

Major

Supporting Courses12
Required Core Courses
Mentoring First Nations Youth 1
Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World
Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice
Oral Emphasis:
Native American Landscapes:Imagined and Lived Spaces
First Nations and The Sacred
Upper-Level Courses27
First Nations Studies Capstone Seminar
First Nations Policy:
First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments
First Nations and Education Policy
Oral Emphasis (complete one of the following 12 credit options):
Option 1 Oneida Language Project
Oneida Language I
Oneida Language II
Oneida Language III
Oneida Language IV
Option 2
Oneida Language I
First Nations Studies Oral Tradition Concentration (Repeatable 3-12 credits)
First Nations Studies Oral Tradition Concentration
Elective Courses (choose 9 credits): 2
Art of the First Nations
Oneida Language II
Oneida Language III
Oneida Language IV
American Ethnic Literature
Women and Gender in First Nations Communities
Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions
Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory
First Nations Intellectual Traditions
First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments
First Nations and Education Policy
First Nations Studies Oral Tradition Concentration
Internship
Independent Study
Travel Course
Interdisciplinary Study of Great Works (Indigenous Intellectuals topic only)
Total Credits39

Minor 

Supporting Courses9
Mentoring First Nations Youth 1
Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World
Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice
Upper Level Courses15
First Nations Studies Capstone Seminar
Policy Requirement:
First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments
First Nations and Education Policy
Elective Courses (choose 9 credits): 2
Art of the First Nations
Oneida Language I
Oneida Language II
Oneida Language III
Oneida Language IV
American Ethnic Literature
Women and Gender in First Nations Communities
Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions
Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory
First Nations Intellectual Traditions
First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments
First Nations and Education Policy
First Nations Studies Oral Tradition Concentration
Internship
Independent Study 3
Travel Course
Total Credits24

Curriculum Guide 

The following is a curriculum guide for a four-year First Nations Studies degree program and is subject to change without notice. Students should consult a First Nations Studies program advisor to ensure that they have the most accurate and up-to-date information available about a particular four-year degree option.

An example: Four year plan for First Nations Studies
120 credits necessary to graduate.
Plan is a representation and categories of classes can be switched. Check with your advisor.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallCredits
FNS 211 Mentoring First Nations Youth (or in Freshman year Spring) 3
FNS 225
Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World
or Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice
3
First Year Seminar 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits18
Spring
FNS 211 Mentoring First Nations Youth 3
FNS 225
Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World
or Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice
3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits18
Sophomore
Fall
FNS 224 First Nations and The Sacred 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Spring
FNS 301 Oneida Language I 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
 Credits15
Junior
Fall
FNS 393 First Nations and Education Policy 3
FNS Upper Level Elective 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
Elective 3
 Credits18
Spring
FNS 392 First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments (or FNS Upper Level Elective) 3
General Ed 3
General Ed 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Senior
Fall
FNS 391 First Nations Studies Capstone Seminar 3
FNS Upper Level Elective 3
FNS Upper Level Elective 3
FNS Upper Level Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credits15
Spring
FNS 399 First Nations Studies Oral Tradition Concentration 12
Elective 3
 Credits15
 Total Credits129

Faculty

John P Leary; Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison

Lisa M Poupart; Associate Professor; Ph.D., Arizona State University, chair

Forrest W Brooks; Lecturer; M.S., University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee