Biology

http://www.uwgb.edu/biology/

Disciplinary Major or Minor
(Bachelor of Science)

Professors – Michael L. Draney, Robert W. Howe
Associate Professors – Mathew E. Dornbush, Craig J. Hanke, James C. Marker, Daniel Meinhardt, Brian Merkel, Uwe Pott, Donna L. Ritch, Amy T. Wolf (chair)
Assistant Professors – Patrick Forsythe, Lisa Grubisha

Biology is one of UW-Green Bay's most popular and strongest academic programs. The curriculum explores living systems from subcellular organelles to ecosystems. Biology majors can customize their academic plans to emphasize cell and molecular biology, animal biology, or ecology and conservation science. These tracks prepare students for a wide variety of interdisciplinary careers in resource management, fisheries and wildlife biology, health sciences, genetics, microbiology, science communications (technical writing, journalism, and nature interpretation), and many other fields.  About 40 percent of Biology graduates pursue advanced degrees in graduate or professional schools in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, biological sciences, wildlife biology, or ecology and conservation biology. Students at UW-Green Bay also can combine a Biology degree with a program in primary or secondary school education.

Graduates of UW-Green Bay's Biology program are employed today in government agencies (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Department of Agriculture, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, local government agencies); hospitals and clinics, including veterinary hospitals and zoos; private corporations (pharmaceuticals, food processing, agriculture, etc.); environmental consulting firms; conservation organizations; and educational institutions ranging from elementary schools to universities.

Biology majors combine their studies with an interdisciplinary minor. Human Biology is commonly chosen as a minor by Biology majors with interests in pre-medicine, health sciences or exercise science. Students interested in ecology, biodiversity conservation, and management of biological resources such as wildlife, forests, and fisheries, typically combine a minor in Environmental Science. Other popular interdisciplinary subjects for Biology majors include Business Administration and Environmental Policy and Planning.

Students who prefer a  Biology minor (rather than a major) select an interdisciplinary major. Most students with a Biology minor choose majors in Environmental Science or Human Biology. Students who desire to become science teachers often combine the Biology major with the professional program in Education. Information about teacher certification requirements can be found at the UW-Green Bay Education Office.

UW-Green Bay's Biology program provides outstanding opportunities for students to gain practical experience. Many undergraduates work with faculty on field or laboratory research projects. Internships are widely available with private industry, public agencies, and non-profit organizations. These hands-on experiences are critical for developing a competitive resume for the job market or admission to graduate and professional schools.

The Biology program has well-equipped laboratories for coursework and faculty-guided research. In cellular and molecular biology laboratories, students become familiar with techniques of tissue culture, in situ hybridization, affinity chromatography, agarose and polyacrylamide gel, electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and the use of monoclonal antibodies. In physiology laboratories, students learn techniques to study physiological functions. Teaching and research facilities available to ecology and conservation biology students include the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, the 290-acre Cofrin Memorial Arboretum surrounding the UW-Green Bay campus, four off-campus natural areas managed by the University, the Richter Natural History Museum, small animal laboratory, the Gary A. Fewless Herbarium, a greenhouse, and state-of-the-art computer labs. Advanced undergraduates are able to participate in research projects on Great Lakes ecosystems, northern forests, agroecosystems, rivers, lakes, wetlands, and even tropical forests and mangroves.

Students in the Biology major develop basic skills such as statistical design and analysis, laboratory proficiency, and familiarity with major taxonomic groupings of plants, animals, and microorganisms. Many high paying occupations today require a college-educated individual who can write and speak well, solve problems using a scientific approach, learn new information quickly, and work well with others on a team. UW-Green Bay's Biology students acquire and apply these skills with excellence.

This disciplinary major also requires:

Completion of an interdisciplinary major or minor

Completion of one of the following areas of emphasis:

This disciplinary minor also requires:

Completion of an interdisciplinary major

Courses

BIOLOGY 201. Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Processes. 3 Credits.

Study of biological principles, focusing on cellular structure and function, metabolism, genetics, evolution and development. This introductory course is intended for science majors.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 202. Principles of Biology Lab: Cellular and Molecular Processes. 1 Credit.

This lab course offers an introduction to the biology of organisms at the molecular and cellular level. Labs will focus on the chemical, genetic, and microscopic properties shared by cells. This is a beginning biology course for students who wish to major in Biology, Human Biology or Environmental Science.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 203. Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, and Evolution. 3 Credits.

Survey of the evolution and diversity of life, with focus on general biological principles, anatomy and physiology, and consideration of interactions from the cellular to organismal level.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 204. Principles of Biology Lab: Organisms, Ecology, and Evolution. 1 Credit.

Hands-on laboratory reinforcing material covered in BIOLOGY 203. Laboratory activities explore the structure of seed plants, comparative morphology of animal phyla, dichotomous taxonomic keys, phylogeny, and experimental approaches to plant and animal physiology. This writing emphasis course covers the process and techniques of scientific writing.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 298. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.

BIOLOGY 302. Principles of Microbiology. 4 Credits.

Microorganisms and their activities; their form, structure, reproduction, physiology, metabolism, and identification; their distribution in nature and their relationship to each other and other living things.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 303. Genetics. 3 Credits.

Mechanisms of heredity and variation, their cytological and molecular basis and their implications in biological technology.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 304. Genetics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Basic techniques of genetic research; laboratory investigation and analysis of animal, plant, and human patterns of inheritance.
Fall Only.

BIOLOGY 307. Cell Biology. 3 Credits.

A study of the fundamental biological processes that occur within a cell and its normal environment. Topics include cellular molecules and metabolic processes; membranes and organelles; synthesis and regulation of macromolecules; protein sorting and transport, cytoskeleton; signal transduction, cellular interactions, cell cycle and growth of normal and neoplastic cells.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 308. Cell Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course examining the microscopic, biochemical and molecular approaches used to investigate cellular structure and function.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 309. Evolutionary Biology. 3 Credits.

Patterns and processes of biological evolution and their significance for modern biology. Topics include the history of life, population genetics, speciation, and evolution in populations today.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 310. Plant Taxonomy. 3 Credits.

Identification and classification of vascular plants of North America, emphasizing flora of Wisconsin and including topics in evolution of vascular plants.
Spring.

BIOLOGY 311. Plant Physiology. 4 Credits.

General physiology of vascular plants within the context of a plant life cycle: seed dormancy and germination, metabolism, transport systems, mineral nutrition, patterns of plant growth and development, growth regulators, reproduction and senescence.
Fall Only.

BIOLOGY 312. Mycology. 3 Credits.

Morphology, taxonomy and studies of fungi in medical mycology, allergies, antibiotic production, brewing, baking and other industries; poisonous edible and plant pathogenic fungi; techniques in collection, isolation, pure culture and identification.
Spring.

BIOLOGY 317. Structure of Seed Plants. 3 Credits.

Anatomy of seed plants, with special emphasis upon tissue differentiation and structure.
Fall Even.

BIOLOGY 320. Field Botany. 3 Credits.

Identification and natural history of plants indigenous to northeastern Wisconsin. .
Fall Only.

BIOLOGY 322. Environmental Microbiology. 4 Credits.

This course will focus on the diversity and role of microorganisms in diverse and complex environments, including the use and management of these organisms for the benefit of ecosystems and society.
Spring.

BIOLOGY 340. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. 4 Credits.

A lecture and laboratory course examining the anatomy of organs and organ systems of the vertebrates with emphasis on adaptations. Specimens primarily studied in the lab are the shark and cat.
Fall Only.

BIOLOGY 341. Ichthyology. 4 Credits.

An examination of the biology of fishes including classification, phylogeny, functional morphology and population characteristics. Aspects of the ecology of the fishes will be studied in relation to behavior, distribution, diversity and production in freshwater environments. P: None.
Spring Even.

BIOLOGY 342. Ornithology. 3 Credits.

Overview of avian biology, emphasizing adaptation and ecology. Identification of North American bird species and other avian families. Region's most interesting birding areas.
Spring Even.

BIOLOGY 343. Mammalogy. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive study of mammals, including systematics, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory studies include work with specimens from the Richter Natural History Museum.
Spring Odd.

BIOLOGY 345. Animal Behavior. 3 Credits.

Biology of animal behavior patterns; behavioral interactions of animals with their environment.
Spring Even.

BIOLOGY 346. Comparative Physiology. 3 Credits.

Ways in which dissimilar organisms perform similar functions. Behavioral, physiological, and biochemical solutions to problems imposed on invertebrate and vertebrate animals by their environment.
Spring.

BIOLOGY 353. Invertebrate Biology. 4 Credits.

Survey of invertebrate animals. A phylum-by-phylum survey examining defining characters, structure, function, life cycles, and ecology of invertebrate animals. Lab focuses on identification of invertebrates living in Wisconsin.
Fall Odd.

BIOLOGY 355. Entomology. 3 Credits.

Structure, function, diversity, and ecology of insects, as well as their impact on human society. Lab develops ability to identify Wisconsin insects, both in the field and by examining microscopic anatomy.
Fall Even.

BIOLOGY 402. Advanced Microbiology. 4 Credits.

Study of viruses, bacteria, and viruses in relationship to their environment.
Spring Even.

BIOLOGY 407. Molecular Biology. 3 Credits.

Molecular approaches to biological problems, emphasizing study of informational macro molecules. Topics include replication, control, expression, organization, and manipulation of genes; RNA processing; protein processing; transposons; oncogenies, growth factors; genetic control of development and the immune system.
Spring Odd.

BIOLOGY 408. Molecular Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Molecular biology of nucleic acids and the techniques that form the basis of biotechnology. Topics include electrophoresis, restriction mapping, hybridization, plasmid analysis, and DNA cloning (recombinant DNA library construction, screening, and mapping).
Spring Odd.

BIOLOGY 410. Developmental Biology. 3 Credits.

This course covers both the classical experiments that contributed to our understanding of developmental biology and the recent explosion of information about development made possible by a combination of genetic, cellular, and molecular approaches. Examples from vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant systems will be used to illustrate underlying principles and concepts. Topics include axis formation, induction, morphogenesis, embryonic pattern formation, cell differentiation, and organogenesis.
Spring.

BIOLOGY 411. Developmental Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory will introduce descriptive and experimental embryological techniques using a variety of model organisms.
Spring.

BIOLOGY 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

Honors in the Major is designed to recognize student excellence within interdisciplinary and disciplinary academic programs.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 490. Biology Seminar. 1 Credit.

This course provides a capstone experience for upper-level students majoring in biology. Class activities introduce students to academic and professional infrasturctures, career oppportunities, and major conceptual issues in the biological sciences. During a significant part of the course, students will read and discuss current articles from the primary sci
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 495. Research in Biology. 1-5 Credits.

Work closely with a faculty member to plan, perform, evaluate, and report on laboratory research in biology or related area.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early in the semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
Fall and Spring.

BIOLOGY 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.