History

http://www.uwgb.edu/history/

Disciplinary Major or Minor
(Bachelor of Arts)

Professors – Gregory S. Aldrete, Harvey J. Kaye
Associate Professors – Caroline S. Boswell, Clifton G. Ganyard (chair), J. Vincent Lowery, Heidi M. Sherman, David J. Voelker
Assistant Professors – Eric J. Morgan, Kimberley Reilly, Jon Shelton

History is an essential guide not only to the past, but to the present and the future. We cannot understand ourselves or our world without understanding the past. History also leads us to a greater awareness of the richness and complexity of our heritage.

A thorough training in history contributes to the foundation of a complete education and can directly prepare one for professional careers in many fields such as law, business, diplomacy, government service, journalism, teaching, and public relations, as well as graduate study. History’s rigorous intellectual discipline and its emphasis on research and analysis nourish intellectual growth and critical thinking.

The History program fully supports and complements UW-Green Bay’s mission, especially interdisciplinary and practical problem-solving. History provides information and structure to many other programs, especially in the humanities and social sciences, while receiving significant impulses from these and other disciplines. History contributes importantly to problem-solving by offering assistance in the recognition, definition, and investigation of problems, exploration of alternative solutions and guidance in their implementation.

History faculty have expertise in political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual history and an excellent record in teaching and scholarship. The University supports the History program with a good library, interlibrary loan facilities, and an exceptional collection of original documents in the Area Research Center.

Students majoring in History must select an interdisciplinary minor, which is an important part of UW-Green Bay’s academic program. For advice on appropriate interdisciplinary minors to accompany the History major, consult with faculty advisers.

Students seeking information on teacher certification should contact the Education Office.

This disciplinary major also requires:

Completion of an interdisciplinary major or minor

Students majoring in History and pursuing DPI certification within the Education program should check with the History adviser about any special History department requirements for prospective teachers.

Supporting Courses15
American History
American History to 1865
History of the United States from 1865 to the Present
Western and World History
Choose three of the following courses:
Foundations of Western Culture I
Foundations of Western Culture II
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
Upper-Level Courses24
Seminar in History
Category I, American History
Choose one of the following courses:
Historical Perspectives on American Democracy
Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory
Problems in American Thought
United States Immigration History
American Colonial History
History of Wisconsin
The Early American Republic
Economic and Business History of the U.S.
Topics in African American History
History of Sexuality in the U.S.
U.S. Women's History
America in the Twentieth Century
Category II, European History
Choose one of the following courses:
The Middle Ages
Early Modern Europe
Europe in the 19th Century
Europe in the 20th Century
Ancient Greece
Ancient Rome
Topics in Ancient History
Topics in Medieval History
Topics in Early Modern European History
Topics in Modern European History
Category III, Non-Western History
Choose one of the following courses:
Area Studies in Democracy and Justice
The Rise of Islamic Civilization to 1800
History of Modern East Asia
History of Modern Africa
Political History of Modern Latin America
Choose 12 credits from the following courses:
Area Studies in Democracy and Justice
Historical Perspectives on American Democracy
Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory
Credits may also be completed from available upper-level (300-400) History courses
Total Credits39

This disciplinary minor also requires:

Supporting Courses6
American History to 1865
History of the United States from 1865 to the Present
Choose one of the following courses: 1
Foundations of Western Culture I
Foundations of Western Culture II
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
Upper-Level Courses12
Choose 12 credits of upper-level History courses. 2
Total Credits18
1

Students may also opt to complete HISTORY 205 or HISTORY 206 in this category. They must take one as required and the other course can be completed in lieu of this course list.

2

Students are required to take one course from Category I and one course from Category II as listed under the major.  The remaining 6 credits may be selected from any 300- or 400- level History course, or DJS 333, DJS 361 or FNS 374.

Courses

HISTORY 101. Foundations of Western Culture I. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of Western Civilization. This course covers ancient civilization through the Renaissance.

HISTORY 102. Foundations of Western Culture II. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of Western Civilization. This covers the Renaissance up to the present.

HISTORY 103. World Civilizations I. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of various world civilizations. This course covers the origins of civilization to the Age of Exploration.

HISTORY 104. World Civilizations II. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art and culture of various world civilizations. This course covers the Age of Exploration up to the present.

HISTORY 205. American History to 1865. 3 Credits.

This course explores early American and United States history through 1865, with attention to politics, society, economy, culture, and gender. Following an overview of Turtle Island (a Native designation for North America) before European contact, likely topics to be considered include the European colonization process; the creation and expansion of the United States; the evolution of formal and informal democratic institutions; Native resistance, accommodation, and persistence; the rise and fall of the institution of African slavery in the Atlantic world; early industrialization; and the causes and outcomes of the Civil War.

HISTORY 206. History of the United States from 1865 to the Present. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of the United States since 1865, with attention to politics, society, economy, and culture. Likely topics to be considered include: the African-American freedom struggle during Reconstruction and the Jim Crow era; the conquest of the trans-Mississippi west; industrialization and labor conflict; immigration; the expansion of American military and economic power around the world, including participation in the First World War, the Second World War, and the global Cold War; the growth of state power; urbanization and suburbanization; feminism, women's rights, civil rights, and other social movements; and the rise of conservatism since the 1970s.

HISTORY 207. Introduction to African-American History. 3 Credits.

Survey of black people's experience in America, beginning with African culture through the development of Afro-American culture and institutions; includes political, social, economic and cultural history.

HISTORY 220. American Environmental History. 3 Credits.

This course offers an introduction to environmental history - the study of the historical relationship between humans and the natural world - with a focus on North America from before European contact up to contemporary times. Likely topics to be considered include: First Nations' relationships with nature and land use patterns prior to European contact; the massive environmental changes that came with the arrival of European colonizers; changing ideas about the proper relationships between humans and nature; and major developments in resource use and management, including the rise of the modern environmental movement in the late 20th century and contemporary environmental problems and challenges.

HISTORY 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HISTORY 301. The Middle Ages. 3 Credits.

Examines Western European history from the late Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Focuses on primary sources and the writings of medieval historians.
P: HUM STUD 101 or 201.

HISTORY 302. Problems in American Thought. 3 Credits.

Selected themes and topics in the history of American thought and culture from the 17th century to the present. May be repeated for credit when different content is offered.
P: jr st.

HISTORY 309. United States Immigration History. 3 Credits.

This course surveys American Immigration History with a special focus on ethnic and race relations. It emphasizes social issues relating to immigration, immigration laws, and multiculturalism.
P: HISTORY 205 and 206.

HISTORY 310. American Colonial History. 3 Credits.

History of North America from the sixteenth century through the late eighteenth century, with an emphasis on interactions among American Indians, Europeans, and Africans, and attention to society, politics, economy, and culture.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 311. History of Wisconsin. 3 Credits.

Wisconsin history from European exploration to the present; development of Wisconsin as part of the international Great Lakes region and the United States; political, economic and cultural history of the region, territory and state.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 312. The Early American Republic. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the political, economic, social, and religious development of the early U.S., from the American revolution to the war with Mexico.
P: Jr st; REC: HISTORY 205.

HISTORY 322. Economic and Business History of the U.S.. 3 Credits.

Development of a corporate economy and the rise of government intervention; industrial, financial, agricultural and labor reorganizations; wage and price policies and their relationship to these general themes; modernization and urbanization and the relationship between the domestic and world economy.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 330. Early Modern Europe. 3 Credits.

This course examines key religious and political narratives as well as major social and cultural phenomena in Europe c.1500-1750. Topics include religious reform, popular culture, pan-European conflict, sexuality and the family, and the rise of the absolutist state.

HISTORY 332. Europe in the 19th Century. 3 Credits.

Europe in the 19th-century surveys of European history during the 19th century. We will consider the poiltical, economic, social, and cultural developments that occurred in Europe during this time and discuss such topics as revolution, Napoleon Bonaparte, industrialization, liveralism, socialism, nationalism, Romanticism, political and social reform, 1848, Realism, national unification, imperialism, urbanization, modernism, and the road to World War I.
P: None; REC: jr. st.

HISTORY 333. Europe in the 20th Century. 3 Credits.

Europe in the 20th-century surveys European history from 1900 until 1999. We will consider the political, economic, social, and cultural developments that occurred in Europe during this time and discuss such topics as World War I, the Russian Revolution, modernism, facism, communism, world War II, the Holocaust, the Cold War, decolonization, the welfare state, 1968, 1989, and the European Union.
REC: jr st.

HISTORY 337. The Rise of Islamic Civilization to 1800. 3 Credits.

Examines the origins of Islam and Islamic civilization and its dispersion throughout Eurasia from 600 to 1800 AD.
P: Hum Stud/History 101 or Hum Stud/History 103, So standing.

HISTORY 340. Topics in African American History. 3 Credits.

Each semester of the course will explore a significant topic in African American history such as the civil rights movements, Black nationalism, the African American family, alienation, and affirmation.
P: HISTORY 207.

HISTORY 353. The U.S. and the World. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the United States' interactions with the larger world, including its experiments with imperialism, interventionism, and multilateralism, from 1898 to the present. Through our study of both United States foreign policy and the engagement of Americans with global and transnational issues such as the spread of democracy, free trade, peace, human rights, and environmentalism, we will critical gain insights into the democratic ideals of the United States and their implications for the larger global community.
P: HISTORY 206 or POL SCI 100 or POL SCI 101.

HISTORY 354. History of Modern East Asia. 3 Credits.

Modern East Asian history since the late nineteenth century, including China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. The course examines political, social, and cultural changes in the region and emphasizes the East Asian response to encounters with the West.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 356. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of modern Africa from 1850 to the present, concentrating on the major political issues faced by the various peoples of Africa from European colonialism onward. We will discuss the development of European colonization, the gradual integration of Africa into the global community, the struggle for liberation, the Cold War in Africa, and modern challenges of post-colonial Africa including civil war, genocide, HIV/AIDS, poverty, and the consequences of colonization.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 358. Political History of Modern Latin America. 3 Credits.

This course adopts a comparative historical approach to the study of modern Latin American politics and society in the twentieth century. The main themes concentrate on the origins of repressive dictatorships, indigenous resistance, revolutionary movements, United States intervention, and the challenge of democracy.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 360. Ancient Greece. 3 Credits.

This course traces the development of Ancient Greek civilization from its origins in the Ancient Near East until its conquests by Rome. Includes social, political, intellectual, economic, and cultural history.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 361. Ancient Rome. 3 Credits.

This course traces the development of Roman civilization from its Etruscan origins through Late Antiquity. Includes social, political, intellectual, economic, and cultural history.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 370. History of Sexuality in the U.S.. 3 Credits.

Historical introduction to sexual behaviors and attitudes in the U.S. from the period of colonization to the present. Includes analyses of the impact of economic, racial, gender, political, and technological change on sexual norms and behaviors.
P: DJS/WOST 241 or HISTORY 205 or 206.

HISTORY 380. U.S. Women's History. 3 Credits.

In this course our goal is a richer understanding of women's experiences in the past, ranging from pregnancy and single motherhood to women's struggles to win the right to vote. Through lectures, discussions and films we will explore a variety of women's lives, consider the ways studying women changes our historical perspectives and focus on how interpretations of the past influence our understanding of current social issues.
P: none; REC: jr st and one cse in U.S. history, U.S. lit or Women's Studies.

HISTORY 402. America in the Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

Examines the history of the United States during the Twentieth Century, emphasizing social, political, and economic themes and issues.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 420. Topics in Ancient History. 3 Credits.

Variable content. Course will explore a topic, issue, problem or controversy in ancient history such as the ancient economy, Augustus, or daily life in the Roman world. Emphasis on primary sources.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 421. Topics in Medieval History. 3 Credits.

Examines themes of the Medieval world, such as the Viking Diaspora, Medieval Russia, the Silk Road, and the Byzantine Empire.
P: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 422. Topics in Early Modern European History. 3 Credits.

The course will explore current topics and themes with European history between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. Possible topics include the witch persecutions, crime and punishment, British history and the history of society and gender.
P: HUM STUD 101 or 102; jr st.

HISTORY 423. Topics in Modern European History. 3 Credits.

This course will examine selected topics in European history since 1789. Sample topics might include the French Revolution, the Bourgeoisie, Existentialism, the World Wars, Nazi Germany, Youth, or Popular Culture.
P: jr st. REC: HUM STUD 102.

HISTORY 450. War and Civilization. 3 Credits.

Examination of key aspects and debates concerning the nature and role of warfare in society over a broad range of cultures and time periods.
P: jr st. REC: HUM STUD 101 and 102.

HISTORY 470. Studies in Comparative History. 3 Credits.

Selected themes and topics in comparative history crossing geographic and temporal boundaries. Possible topics include empires, nomadic societies, the Silk Road, slavery, the Atlantic World, democracy, modern Germany and Japan, and revolutions.
P: jr st.

HISTORY 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

HISTORY 480. Seminar in History. 3 Credits.

Theoretical and practical topics and problems such as research techniques, source materials, comparative studies, analysis and interpretation, and the writing of historical inquiries.
P:Jr st.

HISTORY 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

HISTORY 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

HISTORY 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.