German

http://www.uwgb.edu/german/

Disciplinary Major or Minor
(Bachelor of Arts)

 Professors – David Coury, Jennifer Ham

The German program provides students with the opportunity to develop communication skills in both written and spoken German along with an understanding of and appreciation for German literature and culture. Students developing linguistic and cultural proficiencies are challenged by a curriculum which includes a variety of courses in beginning, intermediate and advanced language, literature, cinema, culture, business and translation studies, as well as travel courses, independent study courses, and internship experiences.

Although many students choose to study German primarily for personal growth and intellectual enrichment, the program is designed to prepare students to enter a variety of careers in, for example, teaching, business, industry and government, and to provide a basis for further study at the graduate level. German language and culture studies are of great professional value in such fields as international business, communications, translating and interpreting, personnel work, public relations, management, education, music, art, philosophy, law, history, anthropology, theology, social work, politics and the travel industry. Furthermore, proficiency in a modern language and understanding of other cultures are essential for peace and prosperity in a mutually interdependent world.

All students in the German program are strongly encouraged to spend as much time as possible in German-speaking cultures; to study a semester or a year at UW-Green Bay’s German exchange university, Kassel Universität or at another university in Hessen; and/or to participate in the summer travel course in Germany. Students have the opportunity to interact with German exchange students, attend film series and weekly German conversation tables, and to participate in a variety of German Club events and trips. The UW-Green Bay Language Resource Center has interactive audio-visual equipment, computers, and international television reception to support students’ language acquisition and cultural awareness.

Students majoring in German will also choose an interdisciplinary minor. Most German students interested in the humanities usually choose the interdisciplinary program in Humanistic Studies; students interested in teaching may choose an Education minor; those interested in business often choose Business Administration or International Business; and those interested in communication fields or creative fields usually choose a minor in Design Arts or Arts Management. Depending on their personal preferences and career goals, students may find other interdisciplinary programs appropriate, such as Human Development or Democracy and Justice Studies.

Students who are beginning their study of German should enroll in Introduction to GERMAN 101. Students with previous German study should select a course appropriate to their level — GERMAN 102, GERMAN 201, GERMAN 202 or GERMAN 225 — by counting a year of high school work as equivalent to a semester of college work, or they should consult the German adviser.

Students seeking teacher certification must be admitted to the Education Program and should contact the Education Office for information and further requirements.

Students may study abroad or at other campuses in the United States through UW-Green Bay’s participation in international exchange programs and National Student Exchange. Travel courses are another option for obtaining academic credits and completing requirements. For more information, contact the Office of International Education at (920) 465-2190 or see http://www.uwgb.edu/international/.

Retroactive Credit

Degree seeking students who have taken a second language in high school or who have acquired knowledge of a second language elsewhere may earn up to 14 additional credits for their previous language study by completing a foreign language course beyond the 101 level. With a grade of “B” or better, credit will be given in that language for all of the courses in that language preceding the one in which the student has enrolled, to a maximum of 14 credits; with a grade of “BC” or “C,” half-credit will be given for the courses preceding the one in which the student has enrolled, to a maximum of seven credits.

For example, with four years of high school German, students who complete GERMAN 225, with a grade of “B” will receive 14 retroactive credits for GERMAN 101, GERMAN 102, GERMAN 201, and GERMAN 202 in addition to the three credits for GERMAN 225; students who complete the course with a “C” will receive seven retroactive credits for GERMAN 101 (2 of the total 4 credits), GERMAN 102 (2 of the total 4 credits), GERMAN 201 (1.5 of the total 3 credits), and GERMAN 202 (1.5 of the total 3 credits).

Requests for retroactive credit in a student’s native language are not generally accepted.

To determine eligibility for retroactive credit, students must consult with the appropriate language program chair or course instructor who will advise them regarding which foreign language course they should take. If a student meets the criteria above, the course instructor must complete the Retroactive Credit Form and submit it to the Registrar’s Office. The appropriate courses and corresponding credits will then be recorded on the student’s transcript.

Retroactive credit will not be awarded based on a student’s performance on any sort of test.  This includes, but is not limited to, AP, CLEP, or Challenge exams.  Retroactive foreign language credits may only be earned by satisfactorily passing a course at UW-Green Bay or through an approved CCHS program as described above.

Retroactive credits earned at any UW System institution or from St. Norbert College courses will be honored and granted to transfer students.  Retroactive foreign language credits awarded by other institutions will not be granted to students who transfer to UW-Green Bay.  Students may request an exception to this policy by submitting a written appeal to the language coordinator of the department they wish to receive credit from.

If you’re repeating a course, contact the German program chair for further information on retroactive credits.

This disciplinary major also requires:

Completion of an interdisciplinary major or minor

Completion of one of the following areas of emphasis:

This disciplinary minor also requires:

Completion of an interdisciplinary major

Completion of one of the following area of emphasis:

Courses

GERMAN 101. Introduction to the German Language I. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in German.

GERMAN 102. Introduction to the German Language II. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in German.
P: none; REC: 1 yr h.s. or 1 sem college German.

GERMAN 201. Intermediate German Language I. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read and speak German.
P: none; REC: 2 yrs h.s. or 2 sem college German.

GERMAN 202. Intermediate German Language II. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read and speak German.
P: none; REC: 3 yrs h.s. or 3 sem college German.

GERMAN 225. Intermediate German Conversation and Composition. 3 Credits.

Development of greater fluency through classroom practice in conversation and composition.
P: none; REC: 4 yrs h.s. or 4 sem college German.

GERMAN 285. Study Abroad: Germany. 3-15 Credits.

P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

GERMAN 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

GERMAN 325. Advanced German Conversation and Composition. 3 Credits.

Continues development of fluency through intensive practice and study of the spoken and written language. Stresses accurate use of grammatical structures and sensitivity to differences in style, tone and levels of language from colloquial to formal.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 329. Representative German Authors. 3 Credits.

Important novels, plays, poems, and essays representative of major eras and movements of German society foster appreciation of the language and understanding of the literature and culture. Includes different styles of writing and differing treatment of recurring themes. Offered in the language. May repeat for credit if different authors are studied.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 333. Literary Themes. 3 Credits.

Explores a single theme such as fantasy, war, revolution, love, alienation, through the literature of one or many nations. May be repeated for credit when a different theme is studied.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 335. Literary Eras. 3 Credits.

Studies the works of a number of writers in relation to their time; includes poetry, prose and drama. May be repeated for credit when a different era is studied.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 345. Advanced German Grammar. 3 Credits.

This course will assist students in improving their overall language proficiency by focusing on more challenging aspects of German syntax and semantics.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 350. Major German Drama. 3 Credits.

Study of German drama either by period or by theme. May be repeated for credit when content is different.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 351. Major German Prose Fiction. 3 Credits.

Study of German short story and/or novels either by period or by theme.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 352. Major German Poetry. 3 Credits.

Study of German poetry either by period or by theme.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 355. Deutsche Kultur und Landeskunde. 3 Credits.

Expands students' linguistic and cultural proficiency in German through discussion of German history, politics and the arts.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 356. German Culture. 3 Credits.

The culture of the German-speaking world from the earliest periods to the present with a focus on how contemporary Germany has been shaped by issues of history, religion, art, music, philosophy, and commerce.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 357. German Cinema. 3 Credits.

Historical and critical introduction to the work of prominent German filmmakers and to cinematic representations of German culture.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 420. Business German. 3 Credits.

Examines business culture and practices in the German speaking world. Practical exercises, including specialized vocabulary for telephoning, writing business correspondence and a German CV, are combined with an analysis of German corporate structures, industry, labor, management, banking, marketing and advertising.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 425. German Translation Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of translating both into and from modern German. Through readings in translation theory and comparative linguistics as well as through group work, students will become aware of the structures and nuances of both languages.
P: GERMAN 225; REC: GERMAN 345.

GERMAN 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

GERMAN 485. Study Abroad: Germany. 3-15 Credits.

A semester of study at the University of Kassel in Germany. Students register before departing; upon return, they must submit descriptions of courses taken, evaluations from professors, a formal certificate, and a letter grade.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

GERMAN 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.

GERMAN 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

GERMAN 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.