General Education Program

Courses that are listed in two or more general education designations will only count in one requirement area. (e.g., ANTHRO 100 is listed as being approved as Global Culture (GC) and Social Sciences (SOC), however it will only count once, as GC or SOC. If questions contact gboss@uwgb.edu

Purpose

The UWGB General Education Program supports the University’s Select Mission by providing an interdisciplinary, problem-focused educational experience that prepares students to think critically and address complex issues in a multicultural and evolving world.

To that end, the UWGB General Education Program will help to develop liberally educated students and facilitate their living in an ever changing world by:

1. Introducing students to interdisciplinary education;

2. Providing knowledge that includes disciplinary breadth;

3. Working with students to develop an understanding of critical social problems;

4. Supporting the development of important academic skills including communication, critical thinking, problem solving and quantitative and information literacy.

The general education program gives students an opportunity to strengthen academic skills, broaden intellectual horizons, develop and explore new academic interests, reflect on personal values, and build a foundation of knowledge for future course work and lifelong learning.

Learning Outcomes

All students who graduate from UW-Green Bay should achieve the following content and skill-based learning outcomes listed here.

Students will:

  • have an understanding of the importance of interdisciplinary thinking and why it can be a more effective way to understand and address problems and issues. Students will develop the ability to think in an interdisciplinary way with the ability to incorporate two or more disciplinary perspectives when addressing a problem particular within the context of their major/minor program.
  • have the ability to exercise problem solving skills such as problem identification and analysis, solution formulation and implementation, and assessment.
  • determine the nature and extent of the information needed; access needed information effectively and efficiently; evaluate information and its sources critically; use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose; and understand the many economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and access and use information ethically and legally.
  • have the ability to communicate effectively through listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • understand the role quantitative thinking plays in solving communicating information about real world problems and relationships such as interpreting and communicating quantitative information from graphs, tables, schematics, etc.
  • have a fundamental understanding of the causes and effects of stereotyping and racism and an appreciation of cultural diversity in the United States.
  • have a fundamental understanding of contemporary global issues and problems related to multiculturalism and ethnocentrism, through the study of beliefs, values, and ways of life in a country other than the United States.
  • be able to critically analyze the concept of sustainability and its three pillars (economic security, social equity, and ecological responsibility) and the way this concept is applied and used (adopted from UW-Oshkosh).
  • have a fundamental understanding of one or more of the fine arts including an understanding of the nature and functions of art and ways of evaluating art.
  • become familiar with the humanities' unique ways of understanding major events and movements in Western and world civilizations by critically examining a range of literary, philosophical, and other cultural texts produced by those movements, thereby helping to clarify individual and social values within cultures and the implications of decisions made on the basis of those values. Students’ understanding will be demonstrated by their ability to analyze and produce complex forms of expression.
  • have a fundamental understanding of natural/physical and biological sciences including major concepts, principles and theories as well as an understanding of the natural/biological sciences’ unique ways of knowing.
  • have a fundamental understanding of  the unique ways of knowing within the social sciences as well as major concepts, impacts, and values of at least two of the designated social sciences.

General Education Requirements1

All students must complete the general education requirements. Depending upon the courses chosen, as well as the need to reach competency in mathematics and writing, students may take between 37-47 general education credits and additional math or writing credits if needed to meet competency or major requirements. Courses taken to fulfill general education requirements may also be used simultaneously to fulfill requirements in the major, minor or certificate programs.

Students who enter UW-Green Bay with 15 or more transfer credits are not required to take a First Year Seminar.  However, in order to meet the 37-47 credit general education requirement, they must substitute the First Year Seminar with another course in general education that is a minimum of 3 credits.

First Year Seminar3
Fine Arts3
Social Sciences6
Humanities6
Biological Sciences3
Natural Sciences3-5
Sustainability Perspective3-4
Ethnic Studies Perspective3
Global Culture3
Quantitative Literacy3-7
Capstone (taken in last semester as part of degree completion)1-4
Total Credits37-47

Graduation Requirements

Capstone Experience (1-4 credits)2

This could be either a classroom seminar experience or another integrative/culminating experience such as an internship/field experience/honors project that again addresses the campus’ interdisciplinary perspective and also has a problem focus. By its very nature, the experience will also have an important communication element. They will all address:

  • Communication
  • Interdisciplinarity

Mathematical and English Competency Requirement: 0-9 credits

All students must demonstrate competency in mathematics and written English. The University uses the Wisconsin Mathematics Placement Test (WMPT) and the English portion of the ACT or the verbal portion of the SAT to assess these competencies. Students may need to take additional courses to satisfy this general education requirement.

Writing Emphasis Requirement: 4 courses

All students must complete four Writing Emphasis courses. At least two of these courses must be at the upper level. Courses taken to fulfill the Writing Emphasis may also be used, simultaneously, to fulfill any other requirements.

UW System Ethnic Studies Requirement: 3 credits

Ethnic Studies is a UW System requirement for all students. Course acceptable for use in UWGB General Education Ethnic Studies Requirement.

1

Contact the Office of Academic Advising for information or assistance on all matters pertaining to general education requirements, including advising. See www.uwgb.edu/lasdean/gened/ for general education information and petitions.

2

 Students who enter the institution meeting the general education requirements are not exempt from completing the Capstone course requirement. This course is required to be completed at the end of your academic major program.

Biological Sciences - Complete one course

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain central principles and theories of biological sciences.
  • Describe the inquiry process through which the sciences approach the development of understanding of the physical world.
Biological Sciences3
Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Processes
Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, and Evolution
Earth System History
Introduction to Human Biology
Fertility, Reproduction, and Family Planning
Human Disease and Society
Biotechnology and Ethics
Food and Nutritional Health
Childhood Obesity: Challenges and Solutions

Capstone - complete one course

  • Capstone courses are taken in the last semester as part of the degree completion requirements at UW Green Bay. The capstone course is not waived for students entering with an earned block of credit, articulation agreement or for earning a prior degree.
  • Honors in the Major courses approved as Capstone courses have additional requirements to enroll into the course, once the course is completed, additional review is done to award Distinction in the Major Honors when a degree is conferred.

Learning Outcomes

  • This could be either a classroom seminar experience or another integrative/culminating experience such as an internship/field experience/honors project that again addresses the campus’ interdisciplinary perspective and also has a problem focus. By its very nature, the experience will also have an important communication element. They will all address:
    • Interdisciplinarity
    • Problem-focused
    • Communication
Capstone1-4
Advanced Microbiology
Biology Seminar
Strategic Management
Strategic Decision Analysis
Biochemistry Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
Social Media Strategies
Honors in the Major
Senior Seminar in Democracy and Justice Studies
Student Teaching
Hydrogeology
Capstone in Environmental Science
Co-op/Internship in Engineering Technology
Capstone Project
Capstone
Seminar in History
Human Physiology Lab - Exercise and Metabolism
Art and Science
Biotechnology and Ethics
Immunology Lab
Capstone
Honors in the Major
Humanities Practicum
Capstone: Synthesis and Assessment of Learning
Honors in the Major
Capstone Project
Synthesis for Nursing Practice
Senior Seminar/Capstone in Political Science
Senior Capstone in Psychology
Seminar in Ethics and Public Action
Social Work Methods III
Theatre Capstone Project

Ethnic Studies Perspective - complete 3 credits

Learning Outcome

Within the context of the United States:

  • Identify ethnic, racial, and cultural contrasts and similarities.
  • Describe ethnic/racial relations from multiple perspectives.
  • Articulate causes and effects of stereotyping and racism.
Ethnic Studies Perspective3
Cultural Images in Materials for Children and Adolescents
American Ethnic Literature
African American Literature
American Indians In Film
Mentoring First Nations Youth
Native American Landscapes:Imagined and Lived Spaces
First Nations and The Sacred
Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World
Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice
Oneida Language I
Oneida Language II
Oneida Language III
Oneida Language IV
Oneida Language V
Oneida Language VI
Women and Gender in First Nations Communities
Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions
Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory
First Nations and Education Policy
Introduction to African-American History
United States Immigration History
Topics in African American History
Introduction to Hmong Culture
Hmong Community Research
Culture, Development and Health
Ethnic Diversity and Human Values
Interdisciplinary Themes in Humanistic Studies
Jazz History
Special Topics in Nursing (Topic #9 only)
Ethnic Influences on Nutrition
Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice
Multicultural Counseling and Mental Health
Understanding Diversity, Challenging Oppression: A Service Learning Course for Helping Professionals
Cross Cultural Diversity and the Helping Professions
Ethnic and Racial Identities
Asian American Communities in the United States
Latino Communities in the United States

Fine Arts - complete 3 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate technical skills and knowledge necessary to create or perform artistic functions, or understand the historical and cultural sources of an art form.
  • Develop historical, stylistic and cultural and aesthetic knowledge necessary to create art or performance in diverse styles within the genre of the course or demonstrate knowledge of terminology and techniques used in an art form to be conversant about such issues. 
  • Synthesize skills and contextual knowledge in performance/creation of artistic works and knowledge of societal influences on art, or demonstrate knowledge of art as an agent of cultural expression and societal change and to use appropriate methods to evaluate quality of an art form. 
Fine Arts3
History of the Visual Arts: Ancient to Medieval
History of the Visual Arts II: Renaissance to Modern
Design Methods
Two-Dimensional Design
Concepts and Issues of Modern Art
Introduction to Ceramics
Introduction to Jewelry/Metals
Art and Ideas
Modern American Culture
World Art
Women, Art and Image
History of Photography
Understanding the Arts
Instrumental Lessons 1
Instrumental Lessons 2
Instrumental Lessons 3
Instrumental Lessons 4
Instrumental Lessons 5
Instrumental Lessons 6
Instrumental Lessons 7
Instrumental Lessons 8
Survey of Western Music
Popular Music Since 1955
Women in the Performing Arts
World Music
Jazz History
Musical Theatre History
Jazz Combo
Jazz Ensemble
Woodwind Ensemble
Brass Ensemble
Contemporary Percussion Ensemble
New Music Ensemble
Chamber Singers
Vocal Jazz Ensemble
Opera Workshop
Hand Drumming Ensemble
Bands and Orchestra
Concert Choir
Chorale
Jazz Combo
Jazz Ensemble
Woodwind Ensemble
Brass Ensemble
Contemporary Percussion Ensemble
New Music Ensemble
Chamber Singers
Vocal Jazz Ensemble
Opera Workshop
Hand Drumming Ensemble
Concert Band
Concert Choir
Chorale
Introduction to Theatre Arts
Jazz Dance I 2
Acting I
Ballet I 2
Period Dance Styles 2
American Musical Theatre Dance 2
Modern Dance I 2
Tap Dance I 2
First Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice
UWGB Meets NYC: New York Theatre Trip
Jazz Dance II 2
Improvisation for the Theatre
Tap Dance II 2
Theatre History I:Greek to Elizabethan
Theatre History II: 17th Century to Realism
Theatre History III: 20th Century and Contemporary
Production Practicum: Crews 2
Production Practicum: Performance 2
Production Practicum: Scene Shop 2
Production Practicum: Costume Shop 2
Dance History

First Year Seminar - complete 3 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • This class provides an “on ramp” to the University and its interdisciplinary mission. It is a content-based class that incorporates communication skills (written and oral) as part of the learning pedagogy. While the content of these courses will vary, they must all address at an introductory level:
    • Interdisciplinarity
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
First Year Seminar 13
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
Integrative Leadership Seminar I
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar
First Year Seminar: The Sixties
1

Occasionally other courses in the catalog are scheduled and offered with additional content to meet the learning outcomes of the first year seminar - these specific class sections are eligible to meet this category

Global Culture - complete 3 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of individual and cultural differences outside the United States.
  • Explore issues that cross geographic, political, economic and/or socio-cultural boundaries outside the United States.
  • Engage in informed judgments about global issues and problems as a socially responsible citizen.
Global Culture3
Varieties of World Culture
Family, Kin, and Community
Myth, Ritual, Symbol and Religion
World Art
International Marketing
World Literatures I
World Literatures II
World Literatures
Intermediate French Language II
Intermediate French Conversation and Composition
Advanced French Conversation and Composition
Representative French Authors
World Regions and Concepts: A Geographic Analysis
Intermediate German Language II
Intermediate German Conversation and Composition
Advanced German Conversation and Composition
Representative German Authors
History of Modern East Asia
History of Modern Africa
Political History of Modern Latin America
Human Disease and Society
Science and Religion: Spirit of Inquiry
Cross Cultural Human Development
Living the Humanities
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
Non-Western Religions
German Culture
German Cinema
Globalization and Cultural Conflict
Perspectives on Human Values: The Contemporary World
Perspectives on Human Values in Other Cultures
World Music
Special Topics in Nursing
Topic: Global Health Ethics and Human Rights
Topic: Global Aspects of Healthcare
Topic: Nursing Diagnosis Across the Globe
World Food and Population Issues
Introduction to Asian Philosophy
Happiness and the Good Life
Global Politics and Society
Comparative Politics
Politics of Developing Areas
Psychology and Culture
Environment and Society
Intermediate Spanish Language II
Composition and Conversation I
Composition and Conversation II
Representative Spanish and Latin American Authors
City Life and Globalization
Cities in Cinema
XXX 299 Travel Course
XXX 499 Travel Course

Humanities - complete 6 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the humanities unique ways of understanding major events and movements in Western and world civilizations.
  • Critically examine a range of literary, philosophical, and other cultural texts produced by those movements.
  • Articulate individual and social values within cultures and the implications of decisions made on the basis of those values.
  • Analyze and produce complex forms of expression.
Humanities 16
Introduction to Film
Introduction to Literature
Introduction to Creative Writing
Introduction to English Literature I
Introduction to English Literature II
Introduction to American Literature I
Introduction to American Literature II
World Literatures I
World Literatures II
Literary Themes
American Indians In Film
First Nations and The Sacred
Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions
Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory
Perspectives on Human Values: First Nations
First Nations Studies Seminar
First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments
First Nations and Education Policy
American History to 1865
History of the United States from 1865 to the Present
Introduction to African-American History
Living the Humanities
Foundations of Western Culture I
Foundations of Western Culture II
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
Introduction to the Humanities
Science Fiction & Fantasy
Science Fiction Film
Interdisciplinary Themes in Humanistic Studies
Globalization and Cultural Conflict
Perspectives on Human Values: The Contemporary World
Introduction to Philosophy
Contemporary Ethical Issues
Logic and Reasoning
Justice and Citizenship in the Modern World
Philosophy, Religion, and Science
Ancient Philosophy
Early Modern Philosophy
Introduction to Asian Philosophy
Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion
Environmental Ethics
Happiness and the Good Life
Plato and Aristotle
Women in Literature
1

 Complete two courses (6 credits) in at least two different course prefixes

Natural Sciences - complete one course

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain central principles and theories of physical sciences.
  • Describe the inquiry process through which the sciences approach the development of understanding of the physical world. 
Natural Sciences3-5
Why There is Antifreeze In Your Toothpaste
Principles of Chemistry I
Introduction to Environmental Sciences
Astronomy
Natural Hazards
Physical Geology
Ocean of Air: Weather and Climate
Information, Computers and Society
Fundamentals of Physics I
Concepts of Physics
Principles of Physics I

Quantitative Literacy - complete one course

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate competence in performing quantitative operations.
  • Communicate and validate quantitative information based on various contexts.
  • Apply analytical concepts and operations to aid in problem-solving, decision-making, and other real-world problems.
  • Interpret models such as formulas, graphs, tables, or schematics, and draw inferences from them.
Quantitative Literacy3-7
Introductory Accounting
Business Statistics
Principles of Chemistry I
Social Science Statistics
Micro Economic Analysis
Human Geography and Concepts
Statistics for Healthcare
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
Introductory Statistics
Logic and Reasoning
Fundamentals of Physics I
Principles of Physics I
Political Behavior
Senior Seminar/Capstone in Political Science
Stagecraft
Computer Applications for Theatre
Stage Lighting
Ear Training and Sight Singing II
   and Music Theory III
   and Music Theory IV

Social Sciences - complete 6 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain how social scientists practice critical thinking.
  • Demonstrate the ability to address problems using tools and methods exemplary of the social sciences.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate content in two different social sciences.
Social Sciences 16
Varieties of World Culture
Family, Kin, and Community
Myth, Ritual, Symbol and Religion
Business and Its Environment
Law and the Individual
Foundations for Social Research
Introduction to Democracy and Justice Studies
Freedom and Social Control
Introduction to Women's & Gender Studies
Macro Economic Analysis
Micro Economic Analysis
History of Economic Thought
Cultural Images in Materials for Children and Adolescents
World Regions and Concepts: A Geographic Analysis
Human Geography and Concepts
Introduction to Human Development
Global Politics and Society
American Government and Politics
Introduction to Public Policy
Environmental Politics and Policy
Politics of Developing Areas
Global Environmental Politics and Policy
Senior Seminar/Capstone in Political Science
Introduction to Psychology
Environment and Society
Introduction to Public Administration
You and Your Future: Living and Working in an Aging Society
Foundations of Social Welfare Policy
Family Principles and Patterns
Introduction to Sociology
Ethnic and Racial Identities
Introduction to Urban Studies
City Life and Globalization
Urban Social Problems
Cities in Cinema
Latino Communities in the United States
1

 Complete two courses (6 credits) in at least two different course prefixes

Sustainability Perspective - complete one course  

Learning Outcomes

  • Think critically regarding the array and implications of alternative sustainability definitions.
  • Discuss sustainability within the context of ethical decision-making on earth.
  • Describe why actions to achieve sustainability are complex and contentious.
  • Express how failure to achieve sustainability has implications for human survival and planetary life quality over time.
  • Engage in informed judgments about sustainability and problems as socially responsible citizens.
Sustainability Perspective3-4
Literary Themes
Energy and Society
Radioactivity: Past, Present, and Future
Environmental Sustainability
Solid Waste Management
Resource Management Strategy
Atmospheric Pollution and Abatement
Conservation Biology
Lean Processes
American Indians In Film
Native American Landscapes:Imagined and Lived Spaces
First Nations and The Sacred
Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World
Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice
Oneida Language I
Oneida Language II
Oneida Language III
Oneida Language IV
Oneida Language V
Oneida Language VI
Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions
Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory
Perspectives on Human Values: First Nations
First Nations Studies Seminar
First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments
First Nations and Education Policy
American Environmental History
Fertility, Reproduction, and Family Planning
Human Disease and Society
Biotechnology and Ethics
World Food and Population Issues
Environmental Ethics
Global Environmental Politics and Policy
Conservation Psychology
Environmental Psychology
Environment and Society
Sustainable Land Use
Transitioning to Sustainable Communities