General Education Program

Purpose

The UWGB General Education Program supports the University’s Select Mission by providing an interdisciplinary, problem-focused educational experience that prepares students to think critically and address complex issues in a multicultural and evolving world.

To that end, the UWGB General Education Program will help to develop liberally educated students and facilitate their living in an ever changing world by:

1. Introducing students to interdisciplinary education;

2. Providing knowledge that includes disciplinary breadth;

3. Working with students to develop an understanding of critical social problems;

4. Supporting the development of important academic skills including communication, critical thinking, problem solving and quantitative and information literacy.

The general education program gives students an opportunity to strengthen academic skills, broaden intellectual horizons, develop and explore new academic interests, reflect on personal values, and build a foundation of knowledge for future course work and lifelong learning.

Learning Outcomes

All students who graduate from UW-Green Bay should achieve the following content and skill-based learning outcomes listed here.

Students will:

  • have an understanding of the importance of interdisciplinary thinking and why it can be a more effective way to understand and address problems and issues. Students will develop the ability to think in an interdisciplinary way with the ability to incorporate two or more disciplinary perspectives when addressing a problem particular within the context of their major/minor program.
  • have the ability to exercise problem solving skills such as problem identification and analysis, solution formulation and implementation, and assessment.
  • determine the nature and extent of the information needed; access needed information effectively and efficiently; evaluate information and its sources critically; uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose; and understands the many economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and access and uses information ethically and legally.
  • have the ability to communicate effectively through listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • understand the role quantitative thinking plays in solving communicating information about real world problems and relationships such as interpreting and communicating quantitative information from graphs, tables, schematics, etc.
  • have a fundamental understanding of the causes and effects of stereotyping and racism and an appreciation of cultural diversity in the United States.
  • have a fundamental understanding of contemporary global issues and problems related to multiculturalism and ethnocentrism, through the study of beliefs, values, and ways of life in a country other than the United States.
  • be able to critically analyze the concept of sustainability and its three pillars (economic security, social equity, and ecological responsibility) and the way this concept is applied and used (adopted from UW-Oshkosh).
  • have a fundamental understanding of one or more of the fine arts including an understanding of the nature and functions of art and ways of evaluating art.
  • become familiar with the humanities' unique ways of understanding major events and movements in Western and world civilizations by critically examining a range of literary, philosophical, and other cultural texts produced by those movements, thereby helping to clarify individual and social values within cultures and the implications of decisions made on the basis of those values. Students’ understanding will be demonstrated by their ability to analyze and produce complex forms of expression.
  • have a fundamental understanding of natural/physical and biological sciences including major concepts, principles and theories as well as an understanding of the natural/biological sciences’ unique ways of knowing.

General Education Requirements1

All students must complete the general education requirements. Depending upon the courses chosen, as well as the need to reach competency in mathematics and writing, students may take between 39 and 48 credits if math or writing courses are needed in addition to the course list below. Courses taken to fulfill general education requirements may also be used simultaneously to fulfill requirements in the major, minor or certificate programs.

Students who enter UW-Green Bay with 15 or more transfer credits will be following a different set of General Education Requirements. Please refer to these requirements here.

First Year Seminar3
Fine Arts3
Social Sciences6
Humanities6
Biological Sciences3
Natural Sciences3-5
Sustainability Perspective3-4
Ethnic Studies Perspective3
Global Culture3
Quantitative Literacy3
Capstone (taken in last semester as part of degree completion)3
Total Credits39-42

Graduation Requirements

Capstone Experience (1-3 credits)2

This could be either a classroom seminar experience or another integrative/culminating experience such as an internship/field experience/honors project that again addresses the campus’ interdisciplinary perspective and also has a problem focus. By its very nature, the experience will also have an important communication element. They will all address:

  • Communication
  • Interdisciplinarity

Mathematical and English Competency Requirement: 0-9 credits

All students must demonstrate competency in mathematics and written English. The University uses the Wisconsin Mathematics Placement Test (WMPT) and the English portion of the ACT or the verbal portion of the SAT to assess these competencies. Students may need to take additional courses to satisfy this general education requirement.

Writing Emphasis Requirement: 4 courses

All students must complete four Writing Emphasis courses. At least two of these courses must be at the upper level. Courses taken to fulfill the Writing Emphasis may also be used, simultaneously, to fulfill any other requirements.

UW System Ethnic Studies Requirement: 3 credits

Ethnic Studies is a UW System requirement for all students. Course acceptable for use in UWGB General Education Ethnic Studies Requirement.

1

Contact the Office of Academic Advising for information or assistance on all matters pertaining to general education requirements, including advising. See www.uwgb.edu/lasdean/gened/ for general education information and petitions.

2

 Students who enter the institution meeting the general education requirements are not exempt from completing the Capstone course requirement. This course is required to be completed at the end of your academic major program.

Biological Sciences - complete one course

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain central principles and theories of biological sciences.
  • Describe the inquiry process through which the sciences approach the development of understanding of the physical world.
    Biological Sciences3
    BIOLOGY 202Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Processes4
    BIOLOGY 203Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, and Evolution4
    GEOSCI 203Geologic Evolution of the Earth3
    HUM BIOL 102Introduction to Human Biology3
    HUM BIOL 206Fertility, Reproduction, and Family Planning3
    HUM BIOL 217Human Disease and Society3
    HUM BIOL 405Biotechnology and Ethics3
    NUT SCI 242Food and Nutritional Health3
    NUT SCI 260Childhood Obesity: Challenges and Solutions3

Capstone - complete one course

Capstone courses are taken in the last semester as part of the degree completion requirements at UW Green Bay. The capstone course is not waived for students entering with an earned block of credit, articulation agreement or for earning a prior degree.

Learning Outcomes

  • This could be either a classroom seminar experience or another integrative/culminating experience such as an internship/field experience/honors project that again addresses the campus’ interdisciplinary perspective and also has a problem focus. By its very nature, the experience will also have an important communication element. They will all address:
    • Interdisciplinarity
    • Problem-focused
    • Communication
Capstone3-4
COMM 477Social Media Strategies3
ENV SCI 467Capstone in Environmental Science4
IST 400Capstone: Synthesis and Assessment of Learning3
MUSIC 480Capstone Project3
PSYCH 494Senior Capstone in Psychology3
PU EN AF 430Seminar in Ethics and Public Action3

Ethnic Studies Perspective - complete  3 credits

Learning Outcomes

Within the context of the United States:

  • Identify ethnic, racial, and cultural contrasts and similarities.
  • Describe ethnic/racial relations from multiple perspectives.
  • Articulate causes and effects of stereotyping and racism.
Ethnic Studies Perspective3
EDUC 206Cultural Images in Materials for Children and Adolescents3
ENGLISH/FNS 336American Ethnic Literature3
ENGLISH 344African American Literature3
FNS 210American Indians In Film3
FNS 216Native American Landscapes:Imagined and Lived Spaces3
FNS 224First Nations and The Sacred3
FNS 225Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World3
FNS 226Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice3
FNS 301Oneida Language I3
FNS 302Oneida Language II3
FNS 303Oneida Language III3
FNS 304Oneida Language IV3
FNS 305Oneida Language V3
FNS 306Oneida Language VI3
FNS/WOST 360Women and Gender in First Nations Communities3
FNS 372Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions3
FNS 374Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory3
FNS 393First Nations and Education Policy3
HISTORY 207Introduction to African-American History3
HISTORY 309United States Immigration History3
HUM DEV 346Culture, Development and Health3
HUM STUD 213Ethnic Diversity and Human Values3
HUM STUD 351Interdisciplinary Themes in Humanistic Studies3
MUSIC 363Jazz History3
NURSING 492Special Topics in Nursing (Topic: Cross Cultural Health)2-4
NUT SCI 302Ethnic Influences on Nutrition3
PSYCH 305Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice3
PSYCH 440Multicultural Counseling and Mental Health3
SOC WORK 330Understanding Diversity, Challenging Oppression: A Service Learning Course for Helping Professionals3
SOC WORK 380Cross Cultural Diversity and the Helping Professions3
SOCIOL 203Ethnic and Racial Identities3
UR RE ST 323Asian American Communities in the United States3
UR RE ST 324Latino Communities in the United States3

Fine Arts - complete 3 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate technical skills and knowledge necessary to create or perform artistic functions, or understand the historical and cultural sources of an art form.
  • Develop historical, stylistic and cultural and aesthetic knowledge necessary to create art or performance in diverse styles within the genre of the course or demonstrate knowledge of terminology and techniques used in an art form to be conversant about such issues. 
  • Synthesize skills and contextual knowledge in performance/creation of artistic works and knowledge of societal influences on art, or demonstrate knowledge of art as an agent of cultural expression and societal change and to use appropriate methods to evaluate quality of an art form. 
Fine Arts3
ART 102History of the Visual Arts: Ancient to Medieval3
ART 103History of the Visual Arts II: Renaissance to Modern3
ART 106Design Methods3
ART 107Two-Dimensional Design3
ART 202Concepts and Issues of Modern Art3
ART 230Introduction to Ceramics3
ART 260Introduction to Jewelry/Metals3
ART 320Art and Ideas3
ART 376Modern American Culture3
ART 378World Art3
ART/WOST 379Women, Art and Image3
ART 380History of Photography3
ARTS MGT 256Understanding the Arts3
MUSIC 121Survey of Western Music3
MUSIC 224Popular Music Since 19553
MUSIC 272Women in the Performing Arts3
MUSIC 362World Music3
MUSIC 363Jazz History3
MUSIC/THEATRE 364Musical Theatre History3
MUS APP XXX: Individual Applied Lessons 1
MUS ENS 142Jazz Combo1
MUS ENS 143Jazz Ensemble1
MUS ENS 144Woodwind Ensemble1
MUS ENS 145Brass Ensemble1
MUS ENS 146Contemporary Percussion Ensemble1
MUS ENS 150New Music Ensemble1
MUS ENS 163Chamber Singers1
MUS ENS 165Vocal Jazz Ensemble1
MUS ENS 166Opera Studio1
MUS ENS 188Hand Drumming Ensemble1
MUS ENS 241Concert Band1
MUS ENS 261Concert Choir1
MUS ENS 262Chorale1
MUS ENS 342Jazz Combo1
MUS ENS 343Jazz Ensemble1
MUS ENS 344Woodwind Ensemble1
MUS ENS 345Brass Ensemble1
MUS ENS 346Contemporary Percussion Ensemble1
MUS ENS 350New Music Ensemble1
MUS ENS 363Chamber Singers1
MUS ENS 365Vocal Jazz Ensemble1
MUS ENS 366Opera Studio1
MUS ENS 388Hand Drumming Ensemble1
MUS ENS 441Concert Band1
MUS ENS 461Concert Choir1
MUS ENS 462Chorale1
THEATRE 110Introduction to Theatre Arts3
THEATRE 128Jazz Dance I 21
THEATRE 131Acting I3
THEATRE 137Ballet I 21
THEATRE 141Period Dance Styles 21
THEATRE 142American Musical Theatre Dance 21
THEATRE 145Modern Dance I 21
THEATRE 161Tap Dance I 21
THEATRE 219UWGB Meets NYC: New York Theatre Trip1
THEATRE 228Jazz Dance II 22
THEATRE 261Tap Dance II 21
THEATRE 309Theatre History I:Greek to Elizabethan3
THEATRE 310Theatre History II: 17th Century to Realism3
THEATRE 311Theatre History III: 20th Century and Contemporary3
THEATRE 335Production Practicum: Crews 21
THEATRE 336Production Practicum: Performance 21
THEATRE 338Production Practicum: Scene Shop 21
THEATRE 339Production Practicum: Costume Shop 21
THEATRE 340Dance History3
THEATRE 364Musical Theatre History3
1

Ensembles (University Chorus, Concert Choir, Collegium Musicum, Chorale, Symphonic Band, Jazz Combo, Wind Ensembles, New Music, Jazz, Vocal, Vocal Jazz, Woodwind, Brass, Guitar, Hand Drumming, and Contemporary Percussion)

2

Repeatable courses. For purposes of general education, each course may be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

First Year Seminar - complete 3 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • This class provides an “on ramp” to the University and its interdisciplinary mission. It is a content-based class that incorporates communication skills (written and oral) as part of the learning pedagogy. While the content of these courses will vary, they must all address at an introductory level:
    • Interdisciplinarity
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
First Year Seminar 13
ART 198First Year Seminar3
COMM 198First Year Seminar3
COMM SCI 198First Year Seminar3
DJS 198First Year Seminar3
EDUC 198First Year Seminar3
ENV SCI 198First Year Seminar3
FNS 198First Year Seminar3
GEOSCI 198First Year Seminar3
HUM BIOL 198First Year Seminar3
HUM DEV 198First Year Seminar3
HUM STUD 198First Year Seminar3
INFO SCI 198First Year Seminar3
MUSIC 198First Year Seminar3
NUT SCI 198First Year Seminar3
PHYSICS 198First Year Seminar3
POL SCI 198First Year Seminar3
PSYCH 198First Year Seminar3
PU EN AF 198First Year Seminar3
THEATRE 198First Year Seminar3
UR RE ST 198First Year Seminar3
1

Occasionally other courses in the catalog are scheduled and offered with additional content to meet the learning outcomes of the first year seminar - these specific class sections are eligible to meet this category

Global Culture - complete 3 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of individual and cultural differences outside the United States.
  • Explore issues that cross geographic, political, economic and/or socio-cultural boundaries outside the United States.
  • Engage in informed judgments about global issues and problems as a socially responsible citizen.
Global Cuture3
ANTHRO 100Varieties of World Culture3
ANTHRO 304Family, Kin, and Community3
ANTHRO 320Myth, Ritual, Symbol and Religion3
ART 378World Art3
BUS ADM 421International Marketing3
ENGLISH 218World Literatures I3
ENGLISH 219World Literatures II3
ENGLISH 338World Literatures3
FRENCH 202Intermediate French Language II3
FRENCH 225Intermediate French Conversation and Composition3
FRENCH 325Advanced French Conversation and Composition3
FRENCH 329Representative French Authors3
GEOG 102/UR RE ST 102World Regions and Concepts: A Geographic Analysis3
GERMAN 202Intermediate German Language II3
GERMAN 225Intermediate German Conversation and Composition3
GERMAN 325Advanced German Conversation and Composition3
GERMAN 329Representative German Authors3
HUM BIOL 217Human Disease and Society3
HUM BIOL 331Science and Religion: Spirit of Inquiry3
HUM DEV 342Cross Cultural Human Development3
HUM STUD 326Non-Western Religions3
HUM STUD/GERMAN 356German Culture3
HUM STUD/GERMAN 357German Cinema3
HUM STUD 360Globalization and Cultural Conflict3
HUM STUD 383Perspectives on Human Values: The Contemporary World3
HUM STUD 384Perspectives on Human Values in Other Cultures3
MUSIC 362World Music3
NURSING 492Special Topics in Nursing2-4
Topic: Global Health Ethics and Human Rights
Topic: Global Aspects of Healthcare
Topic: Nursing Diagnosis Across the Globe
NUT SCI 250World Food and Population Issues3
PHILOS 216Introduction to Asian Philosophy3
PHILOS 351Happiness and the Good Life3
POL SCI 100Global Politics and Society3
POL SCI 351Comparative Politics3
POL SCI 353Politics of Developing Areas3
PSYCH 350Psychology and Culture3
PU EN AF 102Environment and Society3
SPANISH 202Intermediate Spanish Language II3
SPANISH 225Composition and Conversation I3
SPANISH 226Composition and Conversation II3
SPANISH 328Introduction to Cultural Studies in Spanish3
SPANISH 329Representative Spanish and Latin American Authors3
UR RE ST 201City Life and Globalization3
UR RE ST 320Cities in Cinema3
XXX 299 Travel Course
XXX 499 Travel Course

One of the following will also fulfill the Global Culture Requirement:

  • Completion of a second year (fourth semester) of a foreign language at the college level or any upper-level foreign language course. Courses with variable content (course numbers 498, 497, and 478) may be approved for the Global Culture Requirement by use of a special petition.

  • Completion of any approved UW-Green Bay trip outside the United States (XXX-499), or study abroad programs, or student exchange programs outside the United States. Students should contact the Office of International Education for information on opportunities in international education.

  • Substantial living experience outside the United States. The Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or a designate may grant a waiver of the Global Culture Requirement to students based on documented prior experience living in a foreign country.

  • Students who are not residents of the United States will satisfy the requirement by residence and course work at UW-Green Bay.

Humanities - complete 6 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the humanities unique ways of understanding major events and movements in Western and world civilizations.
  • Critically examine a range of literary, philosophical, and other cultural texts produced by those movements.
  • Articulate individual and social values within cultures and the implications of decisions made on the basis of those values.
  • Analyze and produce complex forms of expression.
Humanities 16
ENGLISH 101Introduction to Film3
ENGLISH 104Introduction to Literature3
ENGLISH 212Introduction to Creative Writing3
ENGLISH 214Introduction to English Literature I3
ENGLISH 215Introduction to English Literature II3
ENGLISH 216Introduction to American Literature I3
ENGLISH 217Introduction to American Literature II3
ENGLISH 218World Literatures I3
ENGLISH 219World Literatures II3
ENGLISH 333Literary Themes3
ENGLISH 364Literary Topics3
FNS 210American Indians In Film3
FNS 224First Nations and The Sacred3
FNS 372Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions3
FNS 374Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory3
FNS/HUM STUD 385Perspectives on Human Values: First Nations3
FNS 391First Nations Studies Seminar3
FNS 392First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments3
FNS 393First Nations and Education Policy3
HISTORY 205American History to 18653
HISTORY 206History of the United States from 1865 to the Present3
HISTORY 207Introduction to African-American History3
HISTORY/HUM STUD 101Foundations of Western Culture I3
HISTORY/HUM STUD 102Foundations of Western Culture II3
HISTORY/HUM STUD 103World Civilizations I3
HISTORY/HUM STUD 104World Civilizations II3
HUM STUD 201Introduction to the Humanities I3
HUM STUD 202Introduction to the Humanities II3
HUM STUD 351Interdisciplinary Themes in Humanistic Studies3
HUM STUD 360Globalization and Cultural Conflict3
HUM STUD 383Perspectives on Human Values: The Contemporary World3
PHILOS 101Introduction to Philosophy3
PHILOS 102Contemporary Ethical Issues3
PHILOS 103Logic and Reasoning3
PHILOS 212Philosophy, Religion, and Science3
PHILOS 213Ancient Philosophy3
PHILOS 214Early Modern Philosophy3
PHILOS 216Introduction to Asian Philosophy3
PHILOS 217Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion3
PHILOS 220Environmental Ethics3
PHILOS 351Happiness and the Good Life3
PHILOS 401Plato and Aristotle3
WOST 205Women in Literature3
or ENGLISH 206 Women in Literature
1

 Complete two courses (6 credits) in at least two different course prefixes

Natural Sciences - complete one course

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain central principles and theories of physical sciences.
  • Describe the inquiry process through which the sciences approach the development of understanding of the physical world. 
Natural Sciences3-5
CHEM 211Principles of Chemistry I4
ENV SCI 102Introduction to Environmental Sciences3
ENV SCI/PHYSICS 141Astronomy3
GEOSCI 102Natural Hazards3
GEOSCI 202Physical Geology4
GEOSCI/GEOG 222Ocean of Air: Weather and Climate3
INFO SCI 201Information, Computers and Society3
PHYSICS 103Fundamentals of Physics I5
PHYSICS 180Concepts of Physics3
PHYSICS 201Principles of Physics I5

Social Sciences - complete 6 credits

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain how social scientists practice critical thinking.
  • Demonstrate the ability to address problems using tools and methods exemplary of the social sciences.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate content in two different social sciences.
Social Sciences 16
ANTHRO 100Varieties of World Culture3
ANTHRO 304Family, Kin, and Community3
ANTHRO 320Myth, Ritual, Symbol and Religion3
BUS ADM 202Business and Its Environment3
BUS ADM 206Law and the Individual3
COMM SCI 301Foundations for Social Research3
DJS 101Introduction to Democracy and Justice Studies3
DJS 204Freedom and Social Control3
DJS/WOST 241Introduction to Women's & Gender Studies3
ECON 202Macro Economic Analysis3
ECON 203Micro Economic Analysis3
ECON 307History of Economic Thought3
EDUC 206Cultural Images in Materials for Children and Adolescents3
GEOG 102/UR RE ST 102World Regions and Concepts: A Geographic Analysis3
GEOG 210Human Geography and Concepts3
HUM DEV 102Introduction to Human Development3
POL SCI 100Global Politics and Society3
POL SCI 101American Government and Politics3
POL SCI 202/PU EN AF 202Introduction to Public Policy3
POL SCI 301/PU EN AF 301Environmental Politics and Policy3
POL SCI 353Politics of Developing Areas3
POL SCI 380Global Environmental Politics and Policy3
or PU EN AF 380 Global Environmental Politics and Policy
PSYCH 102Introduction to Psychology3
PU EN AF 102Environment and Society3
PU EN AF 215Introduction to Public Administration3
SOC WORK 250You and Your Future: Living and Working in an Aging Society3
SOC WORK 275Foundations of Social Welfare Policy3
SOCIOL 202Introduction to Sociology3
SOCIOL 203Ethnic and Racial Identities3
UR RE ST 100Introduction to Urban Studies3
UR RE ST 201City Life and Globalization3
UR RE ST 205Urban Social Problems3
UR RE ST 320Cities in Cinema3
UR RE ST 324Latino Communities in the United States3
1

 Complete two courses (6 credits) in at least two different course prefixes

Sustainability Perspective - complete one course  

Learning Outcomes

  • Think critically regarding the array and implications of alternative sustainability definitions.
  • Discuss sustainability within the context of ethical decision-making on earth.
  • Describe why actions to achieve sustainability are complex and contentious.
  • Express how failure to achieve sustainability has implications for human survival and planetary life quality over time.
  • Engage in informed judgments about sustainability and problems as socially responsible citizens.
Sustainability Perspective3-4
ENGLISH 333Literary Themes3
ENGLISH 364Literary Topics3
ENV SCI 260Energy and Society3
ENV SCI 301Radioactivity: Past, Present, and Future3
ENV SCI 303Environmental Sustainability3
ENV SCI 460Resource Management Strategy3
ENV SCI 469Conservation Biology4
FNS 210American Indians In Film3
FNS 216Native American Landscapes:Imagined and Lived Spaces3
FNS 224First Nations and The Sacred3
FNS 225Introduction to First Nations Studies: The Tribal World3
FNS 226Introduction to First Nations Studies: Social Justice3
FNS 299Travel Course1-4
FNS 301Oneida Language I3
FNS 302Oneida Language II3
FNS 303Oneida Language III3
FNS 304Oneida Language IV3
FNS 305Oneida Language V3
FNS 306Oneida Language VI3
FNS 372Indigenous Nations Oral and Storytelling Traditions3
FNS 374Wisconsin First Nations Ethnohistory3
FNS/HUM STUD 385Perspectives on Human Values: First Nations3
FNS 391First Nations Studies Seminar3
FNS 392First Nations Justice and Tribal Governments3
FNS 393First Nations and Education Policy3
FNS 499Travel Course1-6
HISTORY 220American Environmental History3
HUM BIOL 206Fertility, Reproduction, and Family Planning3
HUM BIOL 217Human Disease and Society3
HUM BIOL 405Biotechnology and Ethics3
NUT SCI 250World Food and Population Issues3
PHILOS 220Environmental Ethics3
POL SCI 380/PU EN AF 380Global Environmental Politics and Policy3
PSYCH 390Environmental Psychology3
PU EN AF 102Environment and Society3
PU EN AF 323Sustainable Land Use3
PU EN AF 324Transitioning to Sustainable Communities3

Quantitative Literacy - complete one course

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate competence in performing quantitative operations.
  • Communicate and validate quantitative information based on various contexts.
  • Apply analytical concepts and operations to aid in problem-solving, decision-making, and other real-world problems.
  • Interpret models such as formulas, graphs, tables, or schematics, and draw inferences from them.
Quantitative Literacy3
ACCTG 300Introductory Accounting4
BUS ADM 216Business Statistics4
CHEM 211Principles of Chemistry I4
COMM SCI 205Social Science Statistics4
ECON 203Micro Economic Analysis3
GEOG 210Human Geography and Concepts3
MATH 202Calculus and Analytic Geometry I4
MATH 203Calculus and Analytic Geometry II4
MATH 260Introductory Statistics4
PHILOS 103Logic and Reasoning3
PHYSICS 103Fundamentals of Physics I5
PHYSICS 201Principles of Physics I5
POL SCI 318Political Behavior3
THEATRE 221Stagecraft4
THEATRE 223Computer Applications for Theatre3
THEATRE 323Stage Lighting3
Ear Training and Sight Singing II
   and Music Theory III
   and Music Theory IV

Anthropology Courses

ANTHRO 100. Varieties of World Culture. 3 Credits.

The variety of ways of life that exist in the world and the concepts of culture, cultural relativity, and ethnocentrism. Representative case studies of world cultures are considered.

ANTHRO 304. Family, Kin, and Community. 3 Credits.

A cross-cultural comparison of the form and function of such social institutions as marriage and the family; age, sex and kin groups; task groups; caste and class.

ANTHRO 320. Myth, Ritual, Symbol and Religion. 3 Credits.

Mythology, ritual, and symbolism in the belief systems of a variety of cultures around the world; a survey of anthropological theory relating to belief systems.

Art Courses

ART 101. Tools, Safety, and Materials. 1 Credit.

Acquaints students with a wide range of materials and safe working practices and methods.

ART 102. History of the Visual Arts: Ancient to Medieval. 3 Credits.

Survey of the visual arts: prehistoric to the late Gothic period.

ART 103. History of the Visual Arts II: Renaissance to Modern. 3 Credits.

Survey of the visual arts: early Renaissance to the modern period.

ART 105. Introductory Drawing. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of drawing; emphasis on two-dimensional artwork employing various drawing techniques in black and white media. Students are required to purchase a list of supplies for the class.

ART 106. Design Methods. 3 Credits.

Investigates spatial design as a decision-making and problem-solving process bounded by criteria which include human sensory systems, basic structural systems and materials.
P. None.

ART 107. Two-Dimensional Design. 3 Credits.

Design studio art work and fundamental concepts of art structure and composition, color and design, applying the elements and principles of design. Students are required to purchase a list of supplies for the class.

ART 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

ART 202. Concepts and Issues of Modern Art. 3 Credits.

Key concepts of modern art, the visual art which emerged and the corresponding issues they raise; explores the wider cultural matrix in which modern artistic ideas develop.

ART 210. Introduction to Painting. 3 Credits.

Introduction to acrylic painting techniques, principles of composition, and color mixing. Emphasis on observational painting with an introduction to abstraction.
P: ART 105 or 107; REC: ART 101 and 106.

ART 220. Introduction to Sculpture. 3 Credits.

Survey of various sculpture media, processes, and stylistic approaches; aesthetics and history of sculpture.
P: ART 101 and 106; REC: ART 105 and 107.

ART 230. Introduction to Ceramics. 3 Credits.

Survey of various ceramic forming and firing processes, stylistic approaches; traditional and contemporary aesthetics, and history of ceramics.
P: none: REC: ART 105 and 106 and 107.

ART 243. Introduction to Photography. 3 Credits.

The creative process in photography is studied to develop visual perception and photographic design ability through active participation, photographic exercises, and discussions analyzing student work. Camera is required for course. Option 1: Digital SLR camera with viewfinder, interchangeable lenses, ability to manually adjust focus, aperture, shutter speed and white balance. Option 2: 35mm) film camera with the ability to function in all manual mode.
P: none; REC: ART 105, 106 and 107.

ART 250. Introduction to Fibers/Textiles. 3 Credits.

An introductory overview of teh field of textiles and fiber arts. Students will learn basic processes as well as some of the intellectual, philosophical and historical considerations specific to the study of art cloth, fiber sculpture, textile construction, and embellishment.
P: none; REC: ART 105, 106 and 107.

ART 260. Introduction to Jewelry/Metals. 3 Credits.

Designing and creating jewelry projects using varied metal techniques, processes and metal media; forming, shaping and designing of jewelry.
P: none; REC: ART 105, 106 and 107.

ART 270. Introduction to Printmaking. 3 Credits.

Concept development as it integrates with the exploration of various printmaking media such as relief, monoprint, collagraph, and intaglio.
P: ART 105; REC: ART 106 and 107.

ART 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

ART 302. Intermediate Drawing. 3 Credits.

Investigation of drawing processes and structures in two-dimensional media; includes drawing the human figure; drawing techniques in black, white, and color media.
P: ART 105, 106 and 107.

ART 304. Figure Drawing. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the figure/body as concept, expression, structure, and subject matter in drawing media.
P: ART 105, 106, 107, 302; REC: ART 210.

ART 309. Intermediate Painting: Oil Painting. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the oil painting medium with emphasis on pictorial construction as it relates to images and concepts of the figure/body, landscape, and still life.
P: ART 101, 105, 106, 107 and 210 REC: ART 302 & 304.

ART 310. Intermediate Painting: Media Exploration. 3 Credits.

Experimentation with a variety of painting media (encaustic, egg tempera, watercolor, handmade acrylic paint, acrylic mediums & additives) as a way to connect process, material, and concept. Reciprocal influence of studio areas is encouraged.
P: ART 101, 105, 106, 107, and 210 REC: ART 302 & 375.

ART 311. Intermediate Painting: Contemporary Approaches. 3 Credits.

Students will study the conceptual framework, compositional structures, and techniques/materials used in contemporary painting as a springboard for developing their own paintings.
P: ART 101, 105, 106, 107 and 210.

ART 320. Art and Ideas. 3 Credits.

Art is created to serve many purposes and may be viewed in many ways. This course will investigate diverse examples of visual culture, their contexts, and strategies for viewing and understanding art.

ART 321. Intermediate Sculpture. 3 Credits.

Intermediate work in sculpture including fabrication, casting, carving, and/or modeling; development of individual expression.
P: ART 101, 105, 106, 107 and 220.

ART 331. Intermediate Ceramics. 3 Credits.

Intermediate work in ceramic media: mold work, wheel work or hand building; aesthetics, history and technology of ceramics.
P: ART 105, 106, 107 and 230.

ART 343. Photography II. 3 Credits.

Black-and-white photography, printing practices, and analysis of student work. Camera required.
P: ART 105, 106, 107, and 243.

ART 344. Photography III. 3 Credits.

Applications of photography, including photographic documentation. Black-and-white, color, and digital photography. Camera required.
P: ART 343.

ART 355. Intermediate Fibers/Textiles. 3 Credits.

Expanded exploration of the cloth matrix and fiber media. Textile construction using felting, papermaking and other off-loom techniques. Processing and manipulation of fibers into three-dimensional sculptural forms.
P: ART 105, 106, 107 and 250.

ART 364. Intermediate Jewelry/Metals. 3 Credits.

Intermediate jewelry and art metals techniques: casting, fabricating and assembling mixed-media objects.
P: ART 260 REC: ART 106.

ART 373. Intermediate Printmaking. 3 Credits.

Expanded idea development as it relates to hand and digital/photo-based print processes, such as relief, intaglio, monoprint, lithography, or combined print applications. Student responsibilities include readings, discussions, one presentation, and print creation.
P: ART 105, 106, 107 and 270.

ART 375. Screen Printing. 3 Credits.

Studio work in the art of screen printing, including print concept development, basic materials and equipment and processes including: blockout stencil and photo-emulsion.
P: ART 105, 106 and 107; and ART 270 or 243 or Comm 243.

ART 376. Modern American Culture. 3 Credits.

Fad, fashion and popular art: the media, music, advertising and entertainment as they express the intimate unguarded concerns of modern America.
P: Jr st. or Art, AVD or Theatre major.

ART 378. World Art. 3 Credits.

Survey of selected non-western art and architecture with an emphasis on cultural, social, religious, political and economic context.
P: jr st.

ART 379. Women, Art and Image. 3 Credits.

Examines the impact women have made on art historically as of artists, muses, models, dealers, benefactors and critics with emphasis on images of women in visual culture, deconstructing notions of identify, others and beauty in contemporary society and in the past.
P: jr st; REC: ART 202 or WOST 241.

ART 380. History of Photography. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the major historical, technical, conceptual and theoretical movements within the history of fine art photography. Students will learn photography's role in reflecting and shaping the cultural, social, political, economic, and scientific contexts from 5th century B.C.E. to the present.
P: Junior standing.

ART 395. Exhibition Development and Design. 3 Credits.

Standards, practices and methods of the museum and art gallery profession: planning, promotion, and publicity; development of educational materials and programs; exhibition design and installation; proper handling and treatment of works of art.
P: jr st.

ART 396. Gallery/Museum Practices, Principles and Policy. 3 Credits.

Practical experience in the methods of the museum and art gallery profession; exploration of theoretical, ethical, and operational concerns within the field.
P: ART 395.

ART 402. Advanced Drawing. 3 Credits.

Development of personalized imagery with continuing conceptual, formal, and technical exploration; encourages recriprocal influence of studio areas and learning experiences.
P: ART 302 and 304 or permission of instructor.

ART 410. Advanced Painting. 3 Credits.

Development of personalized imagery with continuing conceptual, formal, and technical exploration; encourages reciprocal influence of studio areas and learning experiences.
P: ART 309 or 310, AND 311, OR permission of instructor.

ART 421. Advanced Sculpture. 3 Credits.

Exploration and refinement of sculptural investigations towards a meaningful and personal body of work.
P: ART 321.

ART 431. Advanced Ceramics. 3 Credits.

Extension and development of ceramic techniques and aesthetics into a significant and personal body of work.
P: ART 331.

ART 443. Advanced Problems in Photography. 3 Credits.

Participants identify an area of interest and the problems implied and are directed to appropriate resources. Seminars support production of a major photographic portfolio. Camera required.
P: ART 344.

ART 453. Advanced Fibers/Textiles. 3 Credits.

Exploration of one area of textiles or fiber art such as papermaking, weaving, surface design or applied techniques in directed study with emphasis on development of a personal artistic voice in the media.
P: ART 355.

ART 463. Advanced Jewelry/Metals. 3 Credits.

Advanced techniques in jewelry; creative research and investigation of metals and jewelry media.
P: ART 364.

ART 470. Advanced Printmaking. 3 Credits.

Advanced techniques and individual expression in one area of printmaking: intaglio, relief, lithography or screen printing. .
P: Art 371, 373, 375 or 377.

ART 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

ART 483. SELECTED TOPICS. 3 Credits.

P: May be repeatable for credit. None.

ART 490. Contemporary Art. 3 Credits.

Investigation of art works and concepts from 1960 to the present.
P: ART 102, 103 and 202; and ART 376 or 378 or 379 or WOST 379.

ART 495. Advanced Gallery/Museum Practices. 3 Credits.

Continued study of specialty areas in the Art Management field with an emphasis on exhibition development, collection management and research.
P: ART 395 and 396.

ART 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Internship with an outside museum or gallery. Activities are determined by the curator of art and a professional in the sponsoring institution.
P: jr st.

ART 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

ART 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Biology Courses

BIOLOGY 202. Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Processes. 4 Credits.

Study of biological principles, focusing on cellular structure and function, metabolism, genetics, evolution and development. This introductory course is intended for science majors.
P: ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr AND ACT Science Score of 24 or greater, OR grade of C or better in HUM BIOL 102, OR grade of C or better in BIOLOGY 203.

BIOLOGY 203. Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, and Evolution. 4 Credits.

Biological principles, structure and function of organisms, with consideration of interactions at cellular level and examination of the relationships of organisms to the environment. Includes laboratories.

BIOLOGY 298. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

BIOLOGY 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

BIOLOGY 302. Principles of Microbiology. 4 Credits.

Microorganisms and their activities; their form, structure, reproduction, physiology, metabolism, and identification; their distribution in nature and their relationship to each other and other living things.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

BIOLOGY 303. Genetics. 3 Credits.

Mechanisms of heredity and variation, their cytological and molecular basis and their implications in biological technology.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; CHEM 108 or 212 with at least a C grade; MATH 260 with at least a C grade;.

BIOLOGY 304. Genetics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Basic techniques of genetic research; laboratory investigation and analysis of animal, plant, and human patterns of inheritance.
P: BIOLOGY 303 with at least a C grade AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

BIOLOGY 307. Cell Biology. 3 Credits.

A lecture course examining the molecular organization of major cellular organelles and their functions in plant and animal cells.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; and CHEM 108 or 212 with at least a C grade; MATH 260 with at least a C grade.

BIOLOGY 308. Cell Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course examining a variety of laboratory techniques used by cell biologists to elucidate cell structure and function.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; AND Chem 108 or 212 with at least a C grade; AND Math 260 with at least a C grade; AND BIOLOGY 307 with at least a C grade or conc enr; AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

BIOLOGY 309. Evolutionary Biology. 3 Credits.

Patterns and processes of biological evolution and their significance for modern biology. Topics include the history of life, population genetics, speciation, and evolution in populations today.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and either BIOLOGY 203 or Human Biology 204 with at least a C grade.

BIOLOGY 310. Plant Taxonomy. 3 Credits.

Identification and classification of vascular plants of North America, emphasizing flora of Wisconsin and including topics in evolution of vascular plants.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at leat a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 003.

BIOLOGY 311. Plant Physiology. 4 Credits.

General physiology of vascular plants within the context of a plant life cycle: seed dormancy and germination, metabolism, transport systems, mineral nutrition, patterns of plant growth and development, growth regulators, reproduction and senescence.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 003; and CHEM 212.

BIOLOGY 312. Mycology. 3 Credits.

Morphology, taxonomy and studies of fungi in medical mycology, allergies, antibiotic production, brewing, baking and other industries; poisonous edible and plant pathogenic fungi; techniques in collection, isolation, pure culture and identification.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade or transfer cse Biology 003.

BIOLOGY 317. Structure of Seed Plants. 3 Credits.

Anatomy of seed plants, with special emphasis upon tissue differentiation and structure.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 003.

BIOLOGY 320. Field Botany. 3 Credits.

Identification and natural history of plants indigenous to northeastern Wisconsin. .
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 003.

BIOLOGY 340. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. 4 Credits.

A lecture and laboratory course examining the anatomy of organs and organ systems of the vertebrates with emphasis on adaptations. Specimens primarily studied in the lab are the shark and cat.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade; OR transfer cse Biology 002; AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

BIOLOGY 341. Ichthyology. 4 Credits.

An examination of the biology of fishes including classification, phylogeny, functional morphology and population characteristics. Aspects of the ecology of the fishes will be studied in relation to behavior, distribution, diversity and production in freshwater environments. P: None.
P: Env Sci 405.

BIOLOGY 342. Ornithology. 3 Credits.

Overview of avian biology, emphasizing adaptation and ecology. Identification of North American bird species and other avian families. Region's most interesting birding areas.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 002.

BIOLOGY 343. Mammalogy. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive study of mammals, including systematics, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory studies include work with specimens from the Richter Natural History Museum.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 002.

BIOLOGY 345. Animal Behavior. 3 Credits.

Biology of animal behavior patterns; behavioral interactions of animals with their environment.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade.

BIOLOGY 346. Comparative Physiology. 3 Credits.

Ways in which dissimilar organisms perform similar functions. Behavioral, physiological, and biochemical solutions to problems imposed on invertebrate and vertebrate animals by their environment.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade and CHEM 212; OR transfer cse Biology 002 and CHEM 212.

BIOLOGY 353. Invertebrate Biology. 4 Credits.

Survey of invertebrate animals. A phylum-by-phylum survey examining defining characters, structure, function, life cycles, and ecology of invertebrate animals. Lab focuses on identification of invertebrates living in Wisconsin.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer course Biology 002.

BIOLOGY 355. Entomology. 3 Credits.

Structure, function, diversity, and ecology of insects, as well as their impact on human society. Lab develops ability to identify Wisconsin insects, both in the field and by examining microscopic anatomy.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 002; REC: BIOLOGY 353.

BIOLOGY 402. Advanced Microbiology. 4 Credits.

Study of viruses, bacteria, and viruses in relationship to their environment.
P: BIOLOGY 302 with at least a C grade; MATH 260 with at least a C grade; AND ENV SCI 207 ro conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

BIOLOGY 407. Molecular Biology. 3 Credits.

Molecular approaches to biological problems, emphasizing study of informational macro molecules. Topics include replication, control, expression, organization, and manipulation of genes; RNA processing; protein processing; transposons; oncogenies, growth factors; genetic control of development and the immune system.
P: BIOLOGY 303 with at least a C grade or CHEM 330 with at least a C grade; REC: CHEM 300 or 303.

BIOLOGY 408. Molecular Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Molecular biology of nucleic acids and the techniques that form the basis of biotechnology. Topics include electrophoresis, restriction mapping, hybridization, plasmid analysis, and DNA cloning (recombinant DNA library construction, screening, and mapping).
P: BIOLOGY 407 or conc enr or CHEM 407 or conc enr; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr of HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr. REC: CHEM 301 or 305.

BIOLOGY 410. Developmental Biology. 3 Credits.

This course examines animal development from fertilization to the establishment of the adult body. Emphasis is placed on the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control differentiation, morphogenesis, and growth.
P: BIOLOGY 303 or 307 or HUM BIOL 310 with at least a C grade.

BIOLOGY 411. Developmental Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory will introduce descriptive and experimental embryological techniques using a variety of model organisms.
P: BIOLOGY 410 with at least a C grade or concurrent enrollment; AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

BIOLOGY 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

BIOLOGY 490. Biology Seminar. 1 Credit.

This course provides a capstone experience for upper-level students majoring in biology. Class activities introduce students to academic and professional infrasturctures, career oppportunities, and major conceptual issues in the biological sciences. During a significant part of the course, students will read and discuss current articles from the primary sci
P: Biology major with jr st.

BIOLOGY 495. Research in Biology. 1-5 Credits.

Work closely with a faculty member to plan, perform, evaluate, and report on laboratory research in biology or related area.
P: HUM BIOL 207 or ENV SCI 207 and approval by faculty mentor.

BIOLOGY 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

BIOLOGY 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

BIOLOGY 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

BIOLOGY 510. Plant Taxonomy. 3 Credits.

Identification and classification of vascular plants of North America, emphasizing flora of Wisconsin and including topics in evolution of vascular plants.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at leat a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 003.

BIOLOGY 511. Plant Physiology. 4 Credits.

General physiology of vascular plants within the context of a plant life cycle: seed dormancy and germination, metabolism, transport systems, mineral nutrition, patterns of plant growth and development, growth regulators, reproduction and senescence.
P: gr st.

BIOLOGY 512. Mycology. 3 Credits.

Morphology, taxonomy and studies of fungi in medical mycology, allergies, antibiotic production, brewing, baking and other industries; poisonous edible and plant pathogenic fungi; techniques in collection, isolation, pure culture and identification.
P: gr student.

BIOLOGY 520. Field Botany. 3 Credits.

Identification and natural history of plants indigenous to northeastern Wisconsin. .
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 003.

BIOLOGY 542. Ornithology. 3 Credits.

Overview of avian biology, emphasizing adaptation and ecology. Identification of North American bird species and other avian families. Region's most interesting birding areas.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade, or transfer cse Biology 002.

BIOLOGY 543. Mammalogy. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive study of mammals, including systematics, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory studies include work with specimens from the Richter Natural History Museum.
P: gr st.

BIOLOGY 553. Invertebrate Biology. 4 Credits.

Survey of invertebrate animals. A phylum-by-phylum survey examining defining characters, structure, function, life cycles, and ecology of invertebrate animals. Lab focuses on identification of invertebrates living in Wisconsin.
P: gr st.

BIOLOGY 555. Entomology. 3 Credits.

Structure, function, diversity, and ecology of insects, as well as their impact on human society. Lab develops ability to identify Wisconsin insects, both in the field and by examining microscopic anatomy.
P: gr st.

BIOLOGY 602. Advanced Microbiology. 4 Credits.

Detailed study of microorganisms from viruses to fungi in their environment. Study of both free-living and pathogenic organisms and their degrading abilities.
P: gr st.

BIOLOGY 607. Molecular Biology. 3 Credits.

Molecular approaches to biological problems, emphasizing study of informational macro molecules. Topics include replication, control, expression, organization, and manipulation of genes; RNA processing; protein processing; transposons; oncogenies, growth factors; genetic control of development and the immune system.
P: gr st.

BIOLOGY 608. Molecular Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Molecular biology of nucleic acids and the techniques that form the basis of biotechnology. Topics include electrophoresis, restriction mapping, hybridization, plasmid analysis, and DNA cloning (recombinant DNA library construction, screening, and mapping).
P: gr st.

BIOLOGY 699. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Business Administration Courses

BUS ADM 202. Business and Its Environment. 3 Credits.

The major components of the business enterprise and its resources, competitive and regulatory environment; pricing, profit, finance planning, controls, ethics, environmental impact, social responsibility and other important concepts; environmental issues that challenge the business leader.

BUS ADM 206. Law and the Individual. 3 Credits.

The American legal system; its principles, processes, language, ethics and laws from the viewpoint of the individual, including family, personal injury, property, consumer, privacy, probate and administrative laws.

BUS ADM 215. Introduction to Business Statistics. 3 Credits.

This course starts from the beginning principles and ideas of probability and statistics and progresses to cover many business statistics applications. Topics include: usefulness of business statistics, describing sets of measurements, probability, random variables and probability distributions, discrete probability distributions, the normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence interval and sample size estimation, hypotheses testing , and developing inferences from samples. Credit will not be granted for both BUS ADM 215 and (COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260).
P: MATH 101 or Math Placement of MATH 101/260 or greater. Credit will not be granted for both BUS ADM 215 and (COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260).

BUS ADM 216. Business Statistics. 4 Credits.

The course examines descriptive statistics, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, independent and paired t-tests, analysis of variance, regression, chi-square, and variance comparisons. The course will also insure students are literate in computer-based statistical packages (e.g., SPSS, SAS, or Minitab).
P: MATH 101 or Math Placement of MATH 101/260 or greater.

BUS ADM 217. Advanced Business Statistics. 3 Credits.

A treatment of advanced topics in statistics applied to a wide variety of business problems. Topics include analysis of variance, linear regression, correlation, multiple linear regression elements of time series analysis, forecasting based on time series models, quality control techniques, survey sampling, analysis of enumerative data, non-parametric statistical methods and decision analysis. Practical business examples are used to illustrate and apply the advanced statistical techniques. Computer applications are included.
P: MATH 260 or COMM SCI 205 or BUS ADM 215.

BUS ADM 282. Personal Financial Planning. 3 Credits.

Exploration and functional analysis of consumers' financial needs and problems in our modern and complex society; learning to formulate financial goals, implement and monitor them through specific plans, financial functions such as budgeting, investing, financing, protecting and distributing wealth; philosophies and values of consumers; legal aspects of consumer rights.

BUS ADM 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

BUS ADM 307. Web Applications and Virtual Information Dissemination. 3 Credits.

Students in this course will acquire an introductory understanding about the technological foundations of the World Wide Web (WWW). They will also learn a well-rounded set of technical skills in major Web applications. Other objectives include establishing a proper strategic perspective on the Web site design.
P: BUS ADM 350. REC: Major in Interd Stu.

BUS ADM 309. Electronic Commerce. 3 Credits.

Familiarizes individuals with current and emerging electronic commerce technologies using the Internet. The purpose of the course is to educate a new generation of managers, planners, analysts and programmers to the realities of and potential for electronic commerce.
P: ECON 308 or Bus Adm 308, 322 or 382. REC: Major in Interd Stu.

BUS ADM 322. Introductory Marketing. 3 Credits.

The marketing system and the managerial techniques used to market goods, services and organizations. Relationships between marketing activities and economic, political and social institutions; understanding consumer behavior; product, price, promotion and distribution decisions.
P: Sophomore status.

BUS ADM 327. Selling and Sales Management. 3 Credits.

Principles and techniques of successful selling that lead to a mutually profitable relationship between salesperson and customer. The nature and scope of sales management: selecting and training sales personnel, importance of customer satisfaction, relationship of company philosophy to the sales force, fundamentals of communication processes.
P: BUS ADM 322 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 343. Corporation Finance. 3 Credits.

Organization of basic financial management functions and principles for business; management of fixed and working capital; short-term and long-term financial planning through investment and financing decisions; domestic and international money and capital markets; ethical issues relating to business financial management.
P: ACCTG 300 and sophomore status.

BUS ADM 344. Real Estate Principles. 3 Credits.

Nature of real estate ownership, importance of land contracts, title transfer, and mortgage instruments; real estate valuation, finance and investment; impacts of taxation, insuring, marketing, and laws affecting real estate (not intended to prepare students for real estate licensing examination).
P: BUS ADM 343 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 345. Risk Management and Insurance. 3 Credits.

Nature of risks, principal techniques of risk management and the bases for making decisions with respect to the management of personal and business risks.
P: BUS ADM 343 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 347. Financial Markets and Institutions. 3 Credits.

Role of financial markets and institutions in forming and managing financial resources; examination and analysis of financial intermediation; organization and functions of the U.S. and international financial systems; structure and investment management strategies of specific financial institutions (such as banks, thrift, insurance and investment companies).
P: BUS ADM 343 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 350. Business Computer Applications. 3 Credits.

Business Computer Applications is designed to give students hands-on experience with popular software applications. The course also covers current introductory topics in computing such as computer software & hardware, internet, network security, databases, and ethics in IS among others.
P: Sophomore status.

BUS ADM 362. Introduction to Human Resource Management. 3 Credits.

Personnel management: human resource planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, fringe benefits, salary and wages, labor relations, and performance evaluation.
P: BUS ADM 382 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 382. Introductory Management. 3 Credits.

The realities of management in contemporary situations, emphasizing the functional approach; understanding the management environment; knowledge required by managers to function effectively and adjust to rapid changes.
P: Sophomore status.

BUS ADM 389. Organizational Behavior. 3 Credits.

A micro organizational behavior course examining motivation, leadership, job satisfaction, learning, group dynamics, and stress in the organizational setting.
P: Sophomore status.

BUS ADM 391. Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Innovation. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to provide a global introduction to the process of turning an idea into a successful startup enterprise. There will be a special emphasis on business plan development and its use as a management tool.

BUS ADM 392. Qualitative Methods in Entrepreneurship. 3 Credits.

The course provides an operational overview with the details of developing and running a business. Emphasis will be placed on strategic management practices; market research, analysis and planning; sales and distribution strategies; human resources; and leadership and team building.

BUS ADM 393. Quantitative Methods in Entrepreneurship. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes the importance of good record keeping systems, reports, and the records necessary for a small business. Financial analysis techniques are explored through hands-on Income Statements and Cash Flow Projections for small businesses. Financial and other technical support resources are identified throughout the course.
P: MATH 101. REC: major in Interd Stu.

BUS ADM 394. Becoming an Entrepreneur. 3 Credits.

Using primarily a case study and project approach, students will experience what it takes to own a business and gain an understanding of the many roles a small business owner has. Students experience starting a business themselves, utilizing all they have learned.
P: BUS ADM 391, 392 and 393 or BUS ADM 391, 322, 382 and ACCTG 300, 302 and 343.

BUS ADM 421. International Marketing. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to help students explore the global market via the disciplines of economics, cultural studies, geography, history, languages, jurisprudence, demographics, politics, and many others. The opportunities and the threats that emanate from the global marketplace are highlighted, and the need for an international marketing approach on the part of individuals and institutions is emphasized.
P: BUS ADM 322 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 423. Advertising. 3 Credits.

Developing and executing advertising campaigns; how these campaigns fit into the total marketing mix; social, legal, and economic considerations and constraints involved in the advertising campaign planning process.
P: BUS ADM 322 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 424. Marketing Research. 3 Credits.

Techniques of obtaining and analyzing information about marketing problems; obtaining and interpreting data from primary and secondary sources for marketing decisions.
P: MATH 260 or BUS ADM 216 or COMM SCI 205; and BUS ADM 322 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 426. Marketing Management. 3 Credits.

Advanced level course in marketing. Strategic interrelationships, development of analytical techniques and abilities and decision making in marketing.
P: BUS ADM 322 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 427. Practicum in Marketing Research. 3 Credits.

Provides students with an opportunity to apply their knowledge of marketing research in hands-on fashion. Students will be doing comprehensive marketing research projects on behalf of area businesses.
P: BUS ADM 424.

BUS ADM 428. Consumer Behavior. 3 Credits.

Theories of buyer behavior, including ultimate and industrial customers, and their implications for marketing management.
P: BUS ADM 322 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 442. Principles of Investment. 3 Credits.

Fundamental concepts, theories, and techniques relating to investing; securities markets, investment vehicles and environments, economic, industry and security analyses, portfolio construction and management; active and passive investment strategies; global investment perspectives and their impacts on investors; blend of facts and theories relating to traditional and modern portfolio approaches; ethics in investment decisions; applied computer-assisted investment decisions.
P: BUS ADM 343 and BUS ADM 216 or COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 445. International Financial Management. 3 Credits.

Conceptual framework and applications of financial management decisions of multinational firms in a global setting; survey of the international financial environment; determinants of international portfolio and direct investment capital flows; assessment and management of impacts of foreign exchange and hedging strategies; impacts of international factors on capital budgeting and financial structure decisions; multinational money and capital markets; taxation of international business.
P: BUS ADM 343 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5; REC: BUS ADM 442.

BUS ADM 446. Advanced Corporation Finance. 3 Credits.

Short-term and long-term financial decisions under risk and uncertainty; financial analysis planning and control; in-depth coverage of theories and applications of capital structure, cost of capital, dividend policies; working capital management; long-term financing decisions; valuation of mergers and acquisitions; international capital budgeting.
P: BUS ADM 343 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5; REC: BUS ADM 442.

BUS ADM 447. Derivatives. 3 Credits.

Coverage of derivative products such as: forwards, futures, options, and swap contracts on commodities, interest rates and equities, as well as the markets in which they trade. Fundamental pricing relationships, trading strategies, and risk management, use of the Binomial Options pricing model and the Black-Scholes model to price derivatives. Exploration of different options strategies, put-call parity, and role of derivatives in portfolio management, option Greeks such as: delta, gamma, vega, theta, and rho.
P: BUS ADM 343 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 450. Bank Administration. 3 Credits.

Commercial banking theories and practices from a financial management perspective; operations, administration, overall asset-liability management of commercial banks, including bank services, credit and loan pricing and analysis, investment portfolio problems, profitability, cost control, and capital budgeting and analysis; implications of deregulation or re-regulation on the financial industry.
REC: BUS ADM 442 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 452. Advanced Microcomputer Business Applications. 3 Credits.

Use of computer technology in management decision-making using Microsoft Excel. Review and application of managerial decision-making models.
P: BUS ADM 216 or MATH 260 or COMM SCI 205; and BUS ADM 350 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 460. Training and Development. 3 Credits.

This seminar focuses on the primary functions of Human Resource Development--training and development, career development, and organizational development. Activities and processes to assist an organization in becoming a learning organization are addressed.
P: BUS ADM 362 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 462. Seminar in Human Resource Management. 3 Credits.

Analysis of human resource problems and issues and their translation into corporate policies; urban, cultural and legal realities in human resource matters; decisions affecting the development and management of human resource policies.
P: BUS ADM 362 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 467. Compensation and Benefits Planning. 3 Credits.

Theories of compensation and work motivation and their impact on various reward systems and the rationale for decisions affecting the selection of benefits.
P: BUS ADM 362 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 472. Leadership Development. 3 Credits.

The course examines contemporary ideas of leadership and issues leaders will face in guiding the organization of the future. The topic is addressed from the perspective of skills and abilities that can be acquired and applied by the student. Theoretical concepts are tied into practice through a course project in the University or the community. The course is structured in a seminar format with an emphasis on discussion.
P: BUS ADM 382 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

BUS ADM 482. Strategic Management. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on the formulation, selection and implementation of business strategies through assessment of organizational performance; competitive, market and industry analysis; development of strategic positions and identification of strategic opportunities. Students practice strategic thinking for a cross section of business types from small, closely held to coprorate, publicly-held, multiple business enterprises. The concepts and ideas of the course are explored through the analysis of case studies.
P: BUS ADM 382 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 483T. Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the knowledge, skills, and practical tools needed to understand, create, and grow a small business and an entrepreneurial environment in the business world.

BUS ADM 489. Organizational Culture & Change. 3 Credits.

A macro organizational behavior course examining organizational environments, structure, power and politics, conflict, innovation, technology, and culture in the organizational setting.
P: BUS ADM 382 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 490. Strategic Decision Analysis. 3 Credits.

Course draws on the conceptual, analytical and interpersonal concepts and skills developed throughout the course of study in Business and Accounting. Students participate in a cross-functional, community of practice environment designed to enhance holistic issue resolution.
P: 85-earned credits; ACCTG 302, ECON 202, BUS ADM 322, BUS ADM 343, BUS ADM 350 and BUS ADM 382 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

BUS ADM 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st; and major/minor in Bus Adm or major/minor in Acctg.

BUS ADM 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

BUS ADM 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

BUS ADM 589. Organizational Behavior. 3 Credits.

A micro organizational behavior course examining motivation, leadership, job satisfaction, learning, group dynamics, and stress in the organizational setting.
P: gr st.

BUS ADM 646. Advanced Corporation Finance. 3 Credits.

Short-term and long-term financial decisions under risk and uncertainty; financial analysis planning and control; in-depth coverage of theories and applications of capital structure, cost of capital, dividend policies; working capital management; long-term financing decisions; valuation of mergers and acquisitions; international capital budgeting.
P: gr st.

Chemistry Courses

CHEM 108. General Chemistry. 4 Credits.

Survey of basic concepts of matter: its measurement, properties and states; atomic structure and chemical bonding; solutions; acid-base theories, introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry.
P: MATH 101 or Math Placement of MATH 104 or greater, and CHEM 109 or conc enrl.

CHEM 109. General Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory Course that accompanies Chem 108.
P: CHEM 108 or concurrent enrollment.

CHEM 211. Principles of Chemistry I. 4 Credits.

Chemistry and measurement; atoms, molecules, and ions; chemical formulas, equations, and reactions; gaseous state; thermochemistry; quantum theory of the atom; electron configurations and periodicity; ionic and covalent bonding; molecular geometry and chemical bonding; and states of matter; liquids and solids.
P: MATH 104 or eq or concurrent enrollment & CHEM 213 or concurrent enrollment. Can't repeat until open enrollment begins.

CHEM 212. Principles of Chemistry II. 4 Credits.

Solutions; kinetics; chemical equilibrium; acids and bases; acid-base equilibrium, solubility and complex ion formation; thermodynamics and equilibrium; electrochemistry; and nuclear chemistry.
P: MATH 104 with at least a C grade or Math Placement of MATH 202 or greater; and CHEM 211 and 213 with at least a C grade; and conc enr in CHEM 214.

CHEM 213. Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory Course that accompanies Chem 211.
P: CHEM 211 or concurrent enrollment.

CHEM 214. Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory Course that accompanies Chem 212
P: CHEM 212 or concurrent enrollment.

CHEM 283F. Exploring Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Students who successfully complete this course will understand basic chemical principles as they relate to the world around them. This class explores the relationships between chemistry and energy, food, medicine, water, the environment and others. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, this course does involve the use of chemical formulas and basic math as algebra and scientific notation. This course is taught online and is intended for non-science majors.

CHEM 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

CHEM 300. Bio-Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Those aspects of the field pertinent to students entering the biologically related disciplines: Basic organic chemistry, natural products and molecules important to biological systems. Full credit not given for both CHEM 300 and CHEM 302 or CHEM 303.
P: CHEM 212 & 214 with at least a C grade or CHEM 108 & 109 with at least a C grade.

CHEM 301. Bio-Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Optional laboratory course to accompany CHEM 300. Credit not granted for both CHEM 301 and 304.
P: CHEM 300 or conc enr; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 302. Organic Chemistry I. 3 Credits.

The chemistry of carbon compounds: structure, reactions, synthesis, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, nomenclature and physical properties of both aliphatic and aromatic compounds; covers all common functional groups and natural products. Full credit will not be awarded for both CHEM 300 and 302 or 303.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade.

CHEM 303. Organic Chemistry II. 3 Credits.

The chemistry of carbon compounds: structure, reactions, synthesis, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, nomenclature and physical properties of both aliphatic and aromatic compounds; covers all common functional groups and natural products. Full credit will not be awarded for both CHEM 303 and 300.
P: CHEM 302 with at least a C grade.

CHEM 304. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. 1 Credit.

Basic and intermediate synthesis, basic and intermediate instrumental techniques in organic chemistry. Credit will not be granted for both CHEM 304 and 301.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade; and CHEM 302 with at least a C grade or conc enr.; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 305. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. 1 Credit.

Basic and intermediate synthesis, basic and intermediate instrumental techniques in organic chemistry.
P: CHEM 303 or conc enr; and CHEM 304 with at least a C grade; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 311. Analytical Chemistry. 4 Credits.

Theory and practice of chemical analysis. Statistics; gravemetric analysis; acid-base chemistry; precipitation, complexometric and redox tetrations; electrochemistry; spectrophotometry; atomic absorption; emission methods; separation methods (gas/liquid chromatography).
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 320. Thermodynamics and Kinetics. 3 Credits.

Temperature, heat and work, thermodynamic properties of gases, solids and solutions; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria; thermodynamics of electrochemical cells; statistical thermodynamics; calculation of thermodynamic properties; chemical kinetics.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade and PHYSICS 202 with at least a C grade and MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

CHEM 321. Structure of Matter. 3 Credits.

Integrated approach to the concepts of physical chemistry and modern physics: introduction to quantum theory, symmetry, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, X-rays, properties of gases, liquids and solids.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade and PHYSICS 202 with at least a C grade and MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

CHEM 322. Thermodynamics and Kinetics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 320.
P: CHEM 320 or conc enr or PHYSICS 320 or conc enr.; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 323. Structure of Matter Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 321.
P: CHEM 321 or conc enr or PHYSICS 321 or conc enr.; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 330. Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Nature and function of the important constituents of living matter, their biosynthesis and degradation; energy transformation, protein synthesis and metabolic control.
P: CHEM 303 with at least a C grade (or concurrent enrollment) and BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; or CHEM 300 with at least a C grade and 301 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade.

CHEM 331. Biochemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 330.
P: CHEM 330 or conc enr.; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 355. Chemistry in the World. 3 Credits.

Focuses on chemistry of modern issues: air pollution, atmospheric ozone, global warming, energy utilization, water as a natural resource, acid rain, and nuclear energy.
P: MATH 101.

CHEM 402. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Physical organic approach to chemistry; reaction mechanisms, molecular orbital theory, conservation of orbital symmetry, aromaticity, stereochemistry, linear free energy relationships, isotopes effects, pericyclic reactions, photochemistry, natural products and advanced topics in molecular spectroscopy.
P: CHEM 303 with at least a C grade; REC: CHEM 321.

CHEM 403. Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 402; advanced molecular spectroscopy, organic qualitative analysis, physical organic chemistry experiments.
P: CHEM 402 or conc enr.; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 407. Molecular Biology. 3 Credits.

Molecular approaches to biological problems, emphasizing study of informational macro molecules. Topics include replication, control, expression, organization, and manipulation of genes; RNA processing; protein processing; transposons; oncogenies, growth factors; genetic control of development and the immune system.
P: BIOLOGY 303 with at least a C grade or CHEM 330 with at least a C grade; REC: CHEM 300 or 303.

CHEM 408. Molecular Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Molecular biology of nucleic acids and the techniques that form the basis of biotechnology. Topics include electrophoresis, restriction mapping, hybridization, plasmid analysis, and DNA cloning (recombinant DNA library construction, screening, and mapping).
P: BIOLOGY 407 or conc enr or CHEM 407 or conc enr; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr of HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr. REC: CHEM 301 or 305.

CHEM 410. Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Survey of the elements including coordination and organometallic compounds. Modern bonding theories, group theory and periodic properties extended and applied to chemical systems and reactions. General acid-base theory and non-aqueous solvent systems.
P: CHEM 212 and CHEM 302 with at least a C grade; REC: CHEM 303.

CHEM 411. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 410.
P: CHEM 410 or conc enr.; CHEM 304 with at least a C grade; ENV SCI 207 or conc enr of HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.; REC: CHEM 305.

CHEM 413. Instrumental Analysis. 4 Credits.

Theory and practice of analysis by instrumental methods, including methods based on absorption and emission of radiation, electroanalytic methods, chromatographic methods and surface analysis methods.
P: CHEM 311 with at least a C grade; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr. REC: CHEM 303.

CHEM 417. Nuclear Physics and Radiochemistry. 3 Credits.

Properties and reactions of atomic nuclei; application of the properties of radioactive nuclei to the solution of chemical, physical, biological and environmental problems.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade and PHYSICS 202 with at least a C grade: REC: CHEM 321.

CHEM 420. Polymer Chemistry. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the synthesis, characterizations, and properties of industrial polymers.
P: CHEM 300 or 303 or 321 or PHYSICS 321.

CHEM 434. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting the composition of air and water. Chemical reactions in polluted, and unpolluted environments; dispersal processes and methods of control for various pollutants.
P: CHEM 311 with at least a C grade and 300 with at least a C grade; or CHEM 311 with at least a C grade and 302 with at least a C grade and 303 with at least a C grade.

CHEM 435. Environmental Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Basic measurement techniques used by environmental scientists to evaluate air and water quality; field methods, continuous monitoring techniques, and in-laboratory analysis techniques. Experiments demonstrate reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, thermodynamics instrumentation, and wet chemical methods.
P: CHEM 434 with at least a C grade or conc enr, or ENV SCI 434 or conc enr, or CHEM 311; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr of HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

CHEM 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

CHEM 495. Research in Chemistry. 1-5 Credits.

P: CHEM 413.

CHEM 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

CHEM 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

CHEM 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

CHEM 520. Thermodynamics and Kinetics. 3 Credits.

Temperature, heat and work, thermodynamic properties of gases, solids and solutions; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria; thermodynamics of electrochemical cells; statistical thermodynamics; calculation of thermodynamic properties; chemical kinetics.
P: gr st.

CHEM 522. Therymodynamics and Kinetics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 520.
P: gr st; and CHEM 520 or conc enr or PHYSICS 520 or conc enr.

CHEM 530. Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Nature and function of the important constituents of living matter, their biosynthesis and degradation; energy transformation, protein synthesis and metabolic control.
P: gr st.

CHEM 531. Biochemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 530.
P: gr st.

CHEM 602. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Physical organic approach to chemistry; reaction mechanisms, molecular orbital theory, conservation of orbital symmetry, aromaticity, stereochemistry, linear free energy relationships, isotopes effects, pericyclic reactions, photochemistry, natural products and advanced topics in molecular spectroscopy.
P: gr st.

CHEM 603. Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 602; advanced molecular spectroscopy, organic qualitative analysis, physical organic chemistry experiments.
P: CHEM 602 or conc enr.

CHEM 607. Molecular Biology. 3 Credits.

Molecular approaches to biological problems, emphasizing study of informational macro molecules. Topics include replication, control, expression, organization, and manipulation of genes; RNA processing; protein processing; transposons; oncogenies, growth factors; genetic control of development and the immune system.
P: gr st.

CHEM 608. Molecular Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Molecular biology of nucleic acids and the techniques that form the basis of biotechnology. Topics include electrophoresis, restriction mapping, hybridization, plasmid analysis, and DNA cloning (recombinant DNA library construction, screening, and mapping).
P: gr st.

CHEM 613. Instrumental Analysis. 4 Credits.

Theory and practice of analysis by instrumental methods, including methods based on absorption and emission of radiation, electroanalytic methods, chromatographic methods and radiochemical methods.
P: gr st.

CHEM 617. Nuclear Physics and Radiochemistry. 3 Credits.

Properties and reactions of atomic nuclei; application of the properties of radioactive nuclei to the solution of chemical, physical, biological and environmental problems.
P: gr st.

CHEM 634. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting the composition of air and water. Chemical reactions in polluted, and unpolluted environments; dispersal processes and methods of control for various pollutants.
P: gr st.

CHEM 635. Environmental Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Basic measurement techniques used by environmental scientists to evaluate air and water quality; field methods, continuous monitoring techniques, and in-laboratory analysis techniques. Experiments demonstrate reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, thermodynamics instrumentation, and wet chemical methods.
P: gr st.

Communication Courses

COMM 102. Introduction to Communication. 3 Credits.

Communication is the means by which individuals learn about themselves and the world around them. This course is an introduction to Communication, which emphasizes the understanding of messages in various settings, including interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass communication. Such topics as the interplay between American society and mass media are discussed.

COMM 133. Fundamentals of Public Address. 3 Credits.

Examination of the principles of oral message preparation and presentation. Students will prepare and present actual public communications.

COMM 166. Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication. 3 Credits.

Principles of personal interaction as a basis of communication: role of communication in interpersonal relationships; role of identity and self-concept in communication behavior; significance of information reception and evaluation in the effectiveness of communication.

COMM 185. Business and Media Writing. 3 Credits.

Business and Media Writing teaches students basic business and media writing skills; resumes, business proposals, memos, reports, press releases, fact sheets, and electronic communications.

COMM 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

COMM 205. Elements of Media. 3 Credits.

Exploring contemporary commercial media; analyzing the business and creative forces behind motion pictures, television, radio and new media; examining regulatory and ethical issues; identifying visual components of persuasive media and the communication strategies involved.

COMM 237. Small Group Communication. 3 Credits.

The role communication plays in small group processes; focuses on development of the special communication skills needed in the small group setting.

COMM 290. Communication Problems and Research Methods. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the necessary critical thinking and research skills to excel in the upper level communication curriculum. The course focuses on creating an understanding of the scientific method and learning how to properly investigate communication problems. Issues covered include how to conduct background research, interview sources, create surveys, conduct focus groups and interpret research results.
P: none; REC: one prior comm cse.

COMM 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

COMM 302. News Reporting and Writing. 3 Credits.

Researching, interviewing and writing various news stories for print and electronic media, with an emphasis on accuracy, fairness, objectivity, and ethics.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 303. Feature Writing. 3 Credits.

Researching, reporting, writing, interviewing, and editing several types of feature stories for both newspapers and magazines. There is also an emphasis on marketing newspaper and magazine features.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 306. Radio Broadcasting. 3 Credits.

Commercial and non-commercial radio as a communications medium and as a business enterprise: radio audiences, audience ratings, programming and program formats, news, advertising, promotion and sales.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 307. Television Production Techniques. 3 Credits.

Exploration of various uses of television as an informative, persuasive, and entertainment medium. Combines analysis of current uses of the medium in a professional context with practical experience in planning and producing a finished product for television.
P: at least 15 credits of supporting core courses in Communication.

COMM 308. Information Technologies. 3 Credits.

A survey of information technologies, their operations and limitations, and how the major electronic technologies are changing and affecting both the workplace and the household.
P: at least 15 credits of supporting core courses in Communication or declared program in Information Sciences.

COMM 309. Mass Media Advertising. 3 Credits.

TV/media/Internet advertising as a unique form of communication. Through the use of both individual and team/group projects, the demands and rigors of the strategic creative process are revealed. Legal, ethical and Internet considerations are also discussed.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 322. Modern Linguistics. 3 Credits.

Structure and system in language, with attention to modern English and including principles of structural, computational and generative-transformational linguistics.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 160.

COMM 333. Persuasion and Argumentation. 3 Credits.

Awareness, appreciation, understanding, and skill in contemporary forms and methods of oral persuasion and argumentation.
P: at least 15 credits of supporting core courses in Communication.

COMM 335. Organizational Communication. 3 Credits.

Communication in the modern organization: communication variables in the context of organizational theory; development of a systems perspective regarding functions, structures and levels of communication in the organization; use of evaluation tools and training strategies.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 336. Theories of the Interview. 3 Credits.

Basic theory behind conducting effective interviews. Specific types of interviews are discussed, such as selection, counseling, exit, discipline, appraisal, mass media and research interviews, from both the interviewer's and the interviewee's perspective.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 340. Mediation and Conflict Resolution. 3 Credits.

The student and practice of alternative dispute resolution strategies. Mediation is emphasized as the primary third-party conflict intervention strategy. Students are certified as basic mediators.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 353. Practicum in Print Journalism I. 3 Credits.

Supervised hands-on experience as a staff member of the Fourth Estate, the campus newspaper. Provides opportunities for in-depth study of one facet of newspaper operation: newswriting, feature writing, photojournalism, layout, management or editing. Involves one-on-one work with professor and editor.
P: ENG COMP 100 or 164 or ACT English score of 25 or higher; REC: Comm 203 or 243 or ART 243.

COMM 366. Media Planning and Selling. 3 Credits.

This course examines the processes used in connecting advertisers' messages with their target audiences. Through lecture, readings, and two case studies, students prepare and present a comprehensive media plan and a media sales package. Traditional media channels (e.g., newspapers, TV) and new media (e.g. the Internet) are included.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 375. Communication Skills: Language of Metaphor. 3 Credits.

Examines metaphors and the metaphoric process and seeks to develop skills in creating and understanding metaphors, especially those that have become an unconscious part of our language and culture.
P: none; REC: Gen Ed req in Arts & Humanities.

COMM 380. Communication Law. 3 Credits.

Freedom of the press and broadcast media, problems of gag orders, contempt, privacy, censorship, libel and slander. Overview of copyright law, the Federal Communications Act and other laws affecting communication.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 381. Principles of Public Relations/Corporate Communications. 3 Credits.

An overview of topics, issues, concepts, and practices of public relations/corporate communications; individual and group case work.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 382. Public Relations Writing. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with professional preparation for the writing required for a public relations career. Students will learn strategies for creating, delivering, and evaluating the many different types of P.R. writing, including social media, news releases, media kits, PSAs, magazine queries, newsletters, pitches and backgrounders.
P: (Comm 282 or 381) AND (Comm 203 or 253). REC: Comm 280, 303, 403.

COMM 403. Advanced Reporting. 3 Credits.

Development of advanced-level reporting, interviewing, writing, and editing of investigative stories, in-depth articles, and copy for the new world of online journalism.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 430. Information, Media and Society. 3 Credits.

The role of information in society, including interpersonal, mass, and institutional sources, in producing a range of effects on individuals, groups, and society as a whole; critical examination of the changing information environment in legal, economic, political, and social contexts.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication or declared student in Information Sciences.

COMM 440. Service Learning in Conflict Resolution. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to meet the upper-level requirement of the Communication emphasis in Conflict Resolution or the Culminating Application Experience requirement of the Peacebuilding and Conflict Resolution Certificate Program. The course integrates the students' prior learning in alternative dispute resolution to applied settings. Students will participate in applied experiences in selected public or private organizations in the community or in campus-related programs to make use of their conflict resolution training.
P: COMM 340.

COMM 445. Human Communication Theory. 3 Credits.

Integration of a variety of theories to promote sensitivity to and understanding of the complexity of human communications; examines the construction of various communication theories, contexts and processes in communication.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 453. Practicum in Print Journalism II. 3 Credits.

Supervised hands-on experience on the staff of the Fourth Estate, the campus newspaper. Provides opportunities for developing advanced skills in some facet of newspaper operation: reporting, feature writing, photojournalism, layout, editing, or management. Involves one-on-one work with professor and editor.
P: Comm 203, 303 or 253; REC: prior experience on 4th Estate.

COMM 477. Social Media Strategies. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of social media strategies. It will focus on the interconnections between a) historical ideas about strategy, b) networking principles, and c) contemporary research on social media. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating and creating social strategies for various objectives.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

COMM 480. Cases in Communications and Media Management. 3 Credits.

This course examines the strategies and practices of communications and media management in organizations. Students integrate their knowledge of oral, written, and visual communication to solve real-world cases.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication.

COMM 495. Teaching Assistantship. 3 Credits.

Students will learn the successful components related to successful instruction, including theoretical perspectives, empirical research, and pedagogical techniques relating to teaching that they can apply to a broad array of future teaching and learning experiences.
P: Jr. st.

COMM 496. Research Assistantship. 1-6 Credits.

Students will assist faculty in conducting research. Responsibilities may include literature reviews, library/Internet investigations, questionnaire development, recruitment and interview of research participants, data collection, management of research studies, data entry and analysis.
P: Jr. st. REC: Comm 200.

COMM 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

COMM 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

COMM 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Community Sciences Courses

COMM SCI 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

COMM SCI 205. Social Science Statistics. 4 Credits.

Application of statistics to problems of the social sciences and of statistical techniques in problem definitions; hypothesis construction; and data collection, processing and evaluation.

COMM SCI 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

COMM SCI 301. Foundations for Social Research. 3 Credits.

An integrated examination of the nature of science, theory and statistics. Emphasizes identifying and interpreting relationships between social phenomena by applying the conceptual tools provided in the course to specific problems.
P: COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260 or BUS ADM 216.

COMM SCI 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Computer Science Courses

COMP SCI 201. Introduction to Computing & Internet Technologies. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the history of computing, overview of computers, how they work, and relevant applications, especially to web site creation. Introduction to procedural programming and an emphasis on ASP.NET using Microsoft Web Development tools part of the Microsoft Visual Studio.NET programming environment, the basics of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

COMP SCI 221. Database Design & Management. 3 Credits.

This introductory course focuses on how databases and database systems work and how they are used in various data-driven applications. The course covers relational databases, SQL, different ways of designing databases, and management of databases. The course provides hands-on experience with exercises using SQL Server and Microsoft Access and includes group discussions. The course also introduces some advanced topics, including database security, data privacy, data analytics, and big data. Working knowledge of Microsoft Office suite and Windows is required for this course.

COMP SCI 231. Introduction to IT Operations. 3 Credits.

This course covers the basic knowledge and skills needed to plan, design, control and monitor Information Technology services and infrastructure. Topics include the fundamentals of asset management, service provisioning, and functional operations. this course serves as an introduction to careers in the IT field.

COMP SCI 232. Introduction to Mobile Platforms and Apps. 3 Credits.

An introduction and survey to the world of mobile computing. Each student will design, develop and produce their own app. Topics covered will include areas such as models of mobile information, GPS services, social networking, casual gaming, networked games, business apps, and information gathering -- all from the perspective of mobile platforms.

COMP SCI 240. Discrete Mathematics. 4 Credits.

Study of topics in mathematics that do not depend upon the limit process, including: number systems, set theory, logic, counting techniques, matrix manipulation, recursion, mathematical induction, graph theory, recurrence relations, and finite state machines. Techniques, computations, and data representations to facilitate problem-solving by hand and by computer.

COMP SCI 256. Introduction to Software Design. 4 Credits.

Students will learn a language common to software design and be introduced to software design techniques. This includes the problem statement, solution design, program testing, implementation, debugging, and final documentation.
P: COMP SCI 201 with at least a C grade and MATH 104 or Math Placement of MATH 202 or greater.

COMP SCI 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

COMP SCI 316. Advanced Software Design. 4 Credits.

A continuation of COMP SCI 256, this course deals with larger projects, more complex problems, and group work. It introduces linear data structures and their implementations. It also develops the object oriented design paradigm to include inheritance and polymorphism.
P: COMP SCI 256 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 331. Internet Programming. 3 Credits.

The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with current Internet technologies to create dynamic database-driven web sites. The emphasis is on server-side programming and on practical Web development techniques and skills.
P: COMP SCI 201 and 316 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 351. Data Structures. 4 Credits.

Concepts involved in storage, retrieval and processing data. Emphasis is on the design of software with complex data retrieval needs and on non-linear structures such as generalized lists, trees, and graphs.
P: COMP SCI 240 with a C grade or better or concurrent enrollment AND COMP SCI 316 with a C grade or better.

COMP SCI 352. Computer Graphics and Animation. 3 Credits.

Basic techniques of computer graphics, such as point and line plotting, clipping and windowing using the OpenGL platform. Use of graphics hardware; construction of graphics packages. Basic animation techniques.
P: COMP SCI 240 and 371 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 353. Computer Architecture and Organization. 3 Credits.

Data representation, assembly language, procedure call protocols, memory, cache, and bus organizations, comparison of processor architectures, I/O systems, logic circuits, Boolean algebra.
P: COMP SCI 240 and 316 with a C grade or better.

COMP SCI 358. Data Communication and Computer Networks. 3 Credits.

Transmission media, analog and digital signals, modulation, compression, error detection methods, security and encryption protocols, Ethernet standards, TCP/IP protocols, routing algorithms, Internet and steraming applications.
P: COMP SCI 316 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 360. Systems Analysis and Project Management. 3 Credits.

This course explores both traditional and new emerging approaches to systems development, analysis, design, and project management, and also discusses professional and ethical responsibilities.
P: COMP SCI 221 and 331 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 371. Advanced Object-Oriented Design. 4 Credits.

Advanced object oriented design techniques in C++ and C#, including: collection classes, class design and class relationships, inheritance, and polymorphism. Additional coverage of C/C++ topics such as pointers and pointer arithmetic, C strings, dynamic memory management, memory leaks, exception handling and operator overloading. Coverage of C# specific constructs such as properties, events, delegates and the use of the .NET framework.
P: COMP SCI 316 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 372. Software Engineering. 3 Credits.

Design and programming techniques for large and complex data-driven projects, using C++. Design based on Design Patterns. Use of Software Engineering metrics and formal methodologies. Fundamentals of component-based software development and software deployment techniques.
P: COMP SCI 221 and 316 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 450. Theory of Algorithms. 3 Credits.

Design, analysis and comparison of algorithms; divide and conquer techniques, greedy method, dynamic programming and smart searching. Applications to optimization with constraints and decision problems. Theory of computability including examples of NP-complete problems such as the "traveling salesman" problem.
P: COMP SCI 240 and 316 and MATH 202, all with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 451. Advanced Database. 3 Credits.

Relational and client/server database technology, scaling to large data sets, stored procedures and triggers, security, integrity rules, database normalization, entity-relationship modeling, concurrency issues, non-SQL databases and Object-oriented databases.
P: COMP SCI 221, 240, and 316.

COMP SCI 452. Operating Systems Using Linux. 3 Credits.

Methods and philosophies behind management of computing resources, including: memory management, process management, scheduling, process signaling, process synchronization, mutual exclusion; interprocess communication, introduction to the Linux Operating System and environment, shell scripting, C programming, process management, and message passing.
P: COMP SCI 240 and 316 with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 464. Artificial Intelligence. 3 Credits.

Study of the fundamental types of artificial intelligence, their principal applications, and implementation of simulations on a conventional computer. These include inference systems, expert systems, artificial neural networks, swarm intelligence, genetic programming, evolutionary computing and reinformcement learning.
P: COMP SCI 240 and 316 and MATH 202, all with at least a C grade.

COMP SCI 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

COMP SCI 490. Capstone Essay in Computer Science. 1-3 Credits.

A project course in which a student does reading in computer science journals and produces a major research paper.
P: 18 earned upper level cr in Comp Sci.

COMP SCI 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

COMP SCI 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

COMP SCI 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

COMP SCI 651. Database Management Systems. 3 Credits.

Relational database technology, structured query language, experience on both mainframe and PC databases, security, integrity rules, design issues, normal forms, and entity-relation modeling.
P: gr st.

Democracy and Justice Studies Courses

DJS 101. Introduction to Democracy and Justice Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to a variety of theories about democracy and justice and offer examples of those who have attempted to put decmocracy and justice into practice.

DJS 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

DJS 204. Freedom and Social Control. 3 Credits.

Explores definitions, concepts and theories used to explain and understand central features of social power. Themes include the struggle for social justice, the history of punishment in Western society, and the legal and extralegal management and disciplining of individuals and groups.

DJS 241. Introduction to Women's & Gender Studies. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary introduction to the study of gender, the influence of gender on social institutions and structures, and an examination of women's lives across the globe historically and today.

DJS 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

DJS 303. Criminal Justice Process. 3 Credits.

A study of the components, relations, and processes of U.S. criminal justice. The criminal justice system is theoretically linked to larger social arrangements, including class and race-ethnic stratification. Ethical problems, such as group disparities in arrest and sentencing, are given special attention.
P: POL SCI 101 and SOCIOL 202.

DJS 307. History of Economic Thought. 3 Credits.

Historical development of contemporary economic thought from the mercantilist period to the present emphasizing contributions of major schools of economic thought.
P: jr st.

DJS 320. Constitutional Law. 3 Credits.

The course emphasizes the history of constitutional law in the United States through an analysis of leading Supreme Court cases that deal with government authority as well as citizen rights and civil liberties. Special attention is given to the political and historical context of major cases and the implications for public policy.
P: POL SCI 101.

DJS 325. Law and Society. 3 Credits.

Explores how the courts can either promote or inhibit progressive social, political, and economic changes in contemporary American society. There is a great deal of emphasis placed on how to use theory to better understand the relationship between law and society.
P: HISTORY 206 or POL SCI 100 or 101 or SOCIOL 202.

DJS 333. Area Studies in Democracy and Justice. 3 Credits.

Development and social justice in a selected nation or region. Course may be repeated for credit with different area.
P: HISTORY 104 OR HUM STUD 104 OR Anthro 100 OR POL SCI 100 OR DJS 251; and ENG COMP 105.

DJS 348. Gender and the Law. 3 Credits.

The changing legal status of women in relationship to other social forces; major historical landmarks in the development of women's legal rights and current status of such areas as property rights, family law and employment opportunity; legal tools in the struggle for equality.
P: sophomore standing.

DJS 349. American Political Thought. 3 Credits.

The history and development of American political thought, with attention to the thinkers and themes influential to controversies, ideologies, and institutions in American politics.
P: POL SCI 101.

DJS 351. Political, Economy of Development. 3 Credits.

The course examines the interaction between global governing bodies and diverse communities of citizens in response to globalization. The course raises awareness about how globalization affects the responsibilities of democratic citizenship and the material and ethical aspects of human rights and social justice.
P: DJS 251 or POL SCI 100.

DJS 353. The U.S. and the World. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the United States' interactions with the larger world, including its experiments with imperialism, interventionism, and multilateralism, from 1898 to the present. Through our study of both United States foreign policy and the engagement of Americans with global and transnational issues such as the spread of democracy, free trade, peace, human rights, and environmentalism, we will critical gain insights into the democratic ideals of the United States and their implications for the larger global community.
P: HISTORY 206 or POL SCI 100 or POL SCI 101.

DJS 361. Historical Perspectives on American Democracy. 3 Credits.

Examination of historical thinking in scholarly work and public life and study of the making of modern American freedom, equality and democracy, past and present.
P: ENG COMP 105 or 228; REC: ANTHRO 100 or SOCIOL 202; and History 100 or HUM STUD 202.

DJS 362. Power and Change in America. 3 Credits.

Study of the dynamic relations between political economy and social structure and the formation and impact of social movements, politics and ideologies in modern America.
P: POL SCI 101 or SOCIOL 202.

DJS 363. Topics in Democracy and Justice. 3 Credits.

Explores a single theme pertaining to democracy and justice from an interdisciplinary perspective. Variable content.
P: DJS 101.

DJS 371. Gender and Economic Justice. 3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to the field of contemporary feminist approaches to economics. Questions range from conceptualization of the economy, work, well-being, and the gendered implications of policy at both micro and macro levels. The course includes an examination of contemporary economic inequalities between men and women (also differentiated by race and class), with a focus on the United States.
P: DJS/Wost 241.

DJS 375. Gender and Global Justice. 3 Credits.

Debates surrounding global justice challenge us to question our obligations toward people around the world. This includes: the moral status of individuals, states and peoples; theories of human rights; the ethics of the use of force; and global inequality, poverty and distributive justice. This course will use concepts in global justice to explore the way gender norms influence women's and men's ability to access legal rights and political freedoms, to challenge legal norms and to improve social welfare.
P: cse in women's studies.

DJS 437. Feminist Theory. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to feminist theories from a variety of disciplinary perspectives; we will examine the development of feminist theories, their practice and contrasting viewpoints.
P: DJS 241.

DJS 461. Social and Political Criticism. 3 Credits.

Operating as a seminar, we examine the role of the American social critic and the practice of social criticism on the political left, right and center. Then, operating as a writing workshop, we compose pieces of political, social and cultural criticism for possible publication.
P: DJS 360 or 361 or SOCIOL 302 or 307.

DJS 470. Senior Seminar in Democracy and Justice Studies. 3 Credits.

Rigorous analysis of an important social change issue or of the work of an important social change theorist.
P: DJS 361; and ENG COMP 105 or 228.

DJS 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

DJS 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

DJS 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

DJS 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Economics Courses

ECON 152. Economic Concepts. 3 Credits.

Introduction to micro- and macro-economic concepts and principles. Understand application to contemporary economic problems and issues in areas of markets, business organizations, prices, money and banking, fiscal policy.

ECON 202. Macro Economic Analysis. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the behavior of our economy in the aggregate, focusing upon the process by which the economy achieves a certain level of output and employment.

ECON 203. Micro Economic Analysis. 3 Credits.

The decision-making processes of individuals and business firms associated with the determination of what products will be produced, how they will be produced, and what prices specific goods and services will command.

ECON 206. Macro Economics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany ECON 202.
P: conc enr in ECON 202.

ECON 207. Micro Economics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany ECON 203.
P: ECON 203 or conc enr.

ECON 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

ECON 302. Intermediate Macro Economic Theory. 3 Credits.

Theories of national income distribution as a basis for an examination of policy proposals to deal with inflation, unemployment, economic fluctuations and economic growth at national and international levels.
P: ECON 202.

ECON 303. Intermediate Micro Economic Theory. 3 Credits.

Theories used in explaining the behavior of consumers and producers in choices relating to the production, exchange and distribution of output.
P: ECON 203.

ECON 304. Contemporary Labor Markets. 3 Credits.

The determination of wages and employment at the level of the firm, the industry, and the total economy.
P: ECON 202 and 203.

ECON 305. Natural Resources Economic Policy. 3 Credits.

Acquaints the student with policies leading to arrangements for the development, management, and use of natural resources. Emphasizes the longer time horizon required for the conservation of resources and a general concern for the quality of ecosystems.
P: ECON 203.

ECON 307. History of Economic Thought. 3 Credits.

Historical development of contemporary economic thought from the mercantilist period to the present emphasizing contributions of major schools of economic thought.
P: jr st.

ECON 308. Business Cycles. 3 Credits.

Description and recent history of business cycles: leading explanations of levels of employment, output and prices; savings and investment, forecasting; governmental policy.
P: ECON 202 and 203.

ECON 309. Urban and Regional Economics. 3 Credits.

Basic concepts in the economics of regions and urban areas, such as industrial location theory, centra place theory, land rent theory, economic base theory, and input-output analysis; applications to problems of economic development, urbanization and place prosperity.
P: ECON 203 and jr st; REC: ECON 202.

ECON 310. Introduction to Quantitative Analysis and Econometrics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the use of mathematical concepts and techniques in the analysis of economic phenomena and the use of statistical methods to estimate equations describing economic events.
P: ECON 203; and MATH 201 or 202; and BUS ADM 215, 216 or COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260.

ECON 330. Money and Banking. 3 Credits.

Analysis of money as an economic institution and of the organizational structure of the commercial and central banking system in the U.S.; monetary theory and policy in the national and international setting.
P: ECON 202.

ECON 340. Economics of Land Use. 3 Credits.

Economic relationships between humans and land. Principles governing land use and conservation and the institutional arrangements of this basic resource. Application of principles in policy-making in land valuation, taxation and zoning in the context of regional economic development.

ECON 342. Community Economic Development. 3 Credits.

Various forces involved in community economic development, including the human and non human resource potentials, motivation, values and attitudes. Examines social and economic structures such as transportation, communication, and community services from the point of view of community development.
P: jr st; and ECON 202 or 203.

ECON 352. Applied Economic Concepts. 3 Credits.

Explores economic principles and consumer economics including money, banking, public finance, and research methods and techniques for economic analysis. For students who have completed macro and micro economic analysis.
P: ECON 202 and 203; or ECON 152.

ECON 371. Gender and Economic Justice. 3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to the field of contemporary feminist approaches to economics. Questions range from conceptualization of the economy, work, well-being, and the gendered implications of policy at both micro and macro levels. The course includes an examination of contemporary economic inequalities between men and women (also differentiated by race and class), with a focus on the United States.
P: DJS/Wost 241.

ECON 402. Environmental and Resource Economics. 3 Credits.

Applications of tools such as cost-benefit analysis and other economic concepts in current public decision making, with special emphasis upon common property resources management.
P: ECON 303 or 305.

ECON 403. International Economics. 3 Credits.

Theory and concepts of international trade and finance; contemporary conditions and problems in international economic relations.
P: ECON 202 and 203 and jr st.

ECON 406. Economics of Globalization. 3 Credits.

Contemporary functioning of different economic systems and institutions in an era or globalization, and their impact on the global economy.
P: ECON 202 and jr st.

ECON 409. Public Finance and Fiscal Policy. 3 Credits.

Effects of government spending and taxation on resource allocation, incomes, prices and employment. Includes consideration of the uses and effects of fiscal policy.
P: ECON 203.

ECON 412. Economics of Sustainability. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the economic conditions for, requisites of, and policy to encourage social, ecological and economic sustainability.
P: ECON 202 or 203; REC: ECON 303 or 402.

ECON 453. Cost Benefit Analysis. 3 Credits.

Application of tools and concepts in current economic decision making, with special emphasis upon Natural Resource management, environmental problems, market failure, and public policy approaches.

ECON 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

ECON 485. Managerial Economics. 3 Credits.

Applications of the basic theoretical tools of micro- and macro-economic analysis to the problems of business management, including such topics as demand, production, costs, pricing and forecasting as well as current economic issues such as environmental policies and regulations.
P: ECON 202 and 203 and Bus Adm major or minor or Acctg major or minor and an overall minimum GPA of 2.5.

ECON 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

ECON 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

ECON 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

ECON 602. Environmental and Resource Economics. 3 Credits.

Applications of tools such as cost-benefit analysis and other economic concepts in current public decision making, with special emphasis upon common property resources management.
P: gr st.

ECON 612. Economics of Sustainability. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the economic conditions for, requisites of, and policy to encourage social, ecological and economic sustainability.
P: gr st.

ECON 653. Cost Benefit Analysis. 3 Credits.

English Composition Courses

ENG COMP 93. Fundamentals of Writing. 3 Credits.

The focus of this course is intended to aid students in generating written discourse which can eventually be shaped or revised into expository prose. The course is a skills course; its intent is to provide students with the fundamental skills needed for the production of expository prose. The focus of the course is on sentence production, correction, and style; paragraph production and organization; spelling skills; reading skills and the production or practice of limited research skills, i.e., paraphrase, summary, and documentation. Grammatical concerns are also stressed, i.e., verb tense, pronoun reference, subject-verb agreement, and punctuation. Offered on a pass/no credit, non-degree credit basis only.

ENG COMP 100. College Writing. 3 Credits.

An introductory course in college writing, emphasizing writing as a process. Focuses on generating and organizing ideas, conducting library research, developing paragraphs, improving sentence structure; reviews conventions of punctuation, grammar, spelling, and usage as needed.
P: Eng Comp 093 or ACT English score of 17 or higher or SAT Verbal score of 450 or higher.

ENG COMP 105. Expository Writing. 3 Credits.

College-level writing skills and principles of logical reasoning, effective organization and development of ideas. Emphasis on research skills and on academic reading and writing.
P: ENG COMP 100 or 164 or ACT English score of 25 or higher or SAT Verbal score of 590 or higher.

ENG COMP 164. English as a Second Language: Composition. 3 Credits.

An introductory course in academic writing for English language learners. Focuses on topic development, library research, paragraph and essay organization, the writing process, and language style.
P: International student status or permission of instructor.

ENG COMP 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

ENG COMP 305. Composition Practicum: Tutoring. 1 Credit.

Effective tutoring in composition requires both a working knowledge of composition theory and guided practice analyzing student essays. This course will invite students to explore those theories and to reflect on their application prior to working as tutors in the Writing Center.
P: prior written cons of inst.

ENG COMP 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

ENG COMP 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

ENG COMP 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

English Courses

ENGLISH 101. Introduction to Film. 3 Credits.

Examines film as literature, as a visual and aural art, as technology, and as a medium which both reflects and influences social trends, values, and attitudes. Involves viewing a range of films and examining their place in film history.

ENGLISH 104. Introduction to Literature. 3 Credits.

The distinctive characteristics of poetry, plays, short stories and the novel, intended to help students understand, appreciate and enjoy literature ranging from the classic to the contemporary.

ENGLISH 206. Women in Literature. 3 Credits.

Surveys both women as writers and women as characters in literature; emphasizes the wisdom, experiences and insights of women writers and women in literature; concerned with literature from two or more cultures and comparison of the social and human values reflected in the literature of those cultures.

ENGLISH 212. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

A first course focused on the analysis, understanding, appreciation, and techniques of writing poetry and fiction, as well as other genres at the discretion of the instructor.

ENGLISH 214. Introduction to English Literature I. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the end of the 18th century, including such writers as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Pope, and Swift.

ENGLISH 215. Introduction to English Literature II. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of English literature from the 19th century to the present, including such writers as Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Tennyson, Shaw, Conrad, Eliot and Thomas.

ENGLISH 216. Introduction to American Literature I. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of American literature from early exploration narratives to Melville, including such writers as Mather, Bradstreet, Paine, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson and Thoreau.

ENGLISH 217. Introduction to American Literature II. 3 Credits.

From Whitman to the present, including such writers as Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, Eliot, Porter, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Cummings, Updike, Walker and Carver.

ENGLISH 218. World Literatures I. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of world literatures from antiquity to roughly 1600. Texts studied will include Nonwestern as well as Western texts.

ENGLISH 219. World Literatures II. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of world literatures other than those of England and the U.S. from rougly 1600 to the present. Texts studied will include Nonwestern as well as Western works.

ENGLISH 224. Practicum in Literary Publishing. 3 Credits.

Hands-on experience in the production of the Sheepshead Review, a literary magazine, from selecting submissions to editing the finished product. Projects include soliciting manuscripts and researching the literary market.
P: ENG COMP 105 or 228 or ACT English score of 32 or higher; REC: ENGLISH 212.

ENGLISH 290. Literary Studies. 3 Credits.

In this course students will learn how to conduct a literary analysis: how to read literature for complexity, how to make an original, organized argument about a literary text, and how to employ academic prose while developing their own writing voice.

ENGLISH 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

ENGLISH 301. Intermediate Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

Analysis of writing in various genres including individual and group criticism of original student materials in workshop context. Variable topics; may be repeated up to total of six credits.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment; and ENGLISH 212 or 213; and ENG COMP 105 or 228 or ACT English score of 32 or higher; and 9 cr of lit cses.

ENGLISH 302. Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 Credits.

Advanced practice in the writing of fiction, including group criticism of student work.
P: ENGLISH 301.

ENGLISH 303. Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop. 3 Credits.

Advanced practice in the writing of poetry, including group criticism of student work.
P: ENGLISH 301.

ENGLISH 304. Creative Nonfiction Writing. 3 Credits.

Advanced study and workshop of creative nonfiction genres such as memoir, essay, book review, and interview.
P: Jr standing; ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment; ENG COMP 105 or ACT English score of 32 or higher; REC: ENGLISH 212 or 301.

ENGLISH 305. Novel Writing Workshop. 3 Credits.

Advanced study in the development and writing of the novel, including group critique of student work.
P: ENGLISH 212 with a grade of at least a B; ENG COMP 105 (or ACT of 32) REC: ENGLISH 301.

ENGLISH 312. Topics in Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

Study and writing of a single topic in creative writing (for example: fairytales, flash fiction, graphic narrative, playwriting, or screenwriting), including individual and group criticism of original student materials in workshop context.
P: Junior standing; ENG COMP 105 or ACT score of 32 or higher. REC: ENGLISH 212.

ENGLISH 315. The English Novel: 1700 to the1850's. 3 Credits.

The development of the English novel from its beginnings to the mid-Victorian period; includes works by such authors Defoe, Sterne, Fielding, Smolett, Austen, Scott, the Brontes, Thackeray, Dickens and Eliot.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 316. The English Novel: 1850's to the Present. 3 Credits.

The development of the English novel from Mid-Victorian to modern times; includes works by such authors as Dickens, Eliot, Trollope, Hardy, Wilde, Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Bowen and Cary.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 320. Major Drama. 3 Credits.

Study of one or more British, Irish or American dramatists and dramatic works.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 322. Major Poetry. 3 Credits.

Significant non-dramatic poetry from England, Ireland, and/or America.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 323. Topics in Literary Criticism. 3 Credits.

In-depth examination of one or more topics, issues, or approaches in literary criticism or theory. May be repeated for credit when a different topic is studied.
P: jr st and ENGLISH 290, or concurrent enrollment.

ENGLISH 324. Practicum in Literary Publishing. 3 Credits.

Hands-on experience in the production of the Sheepshead Review, a literary magazine, from selecting submissions to editing the finished product. Projects include soliciting manuscripts and researching the literary market.
P: ENG COMP 105 or 228 or ACT English score of 32 or higher; REC: ENGLISH 212.

ENGLISH 331. Major American Prose Fiction. 3 Credits.

Study of American prose fiction including examples of novels, short stories and satire; includes works by such authors as Melville, Twain, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Wright and Bellow.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 333. Literary Themes. 3 Credits.

Explores a single theme such as fantasy, war, revolution, love or alienation through the literature of one or several nations. May be repeated for credit when a different theme is studied.
P: Junior standing and ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment.

ENGLISH 335. Literary Eras. 3 Credits.

Studies the works of a number of writers in relation to their time; includes poetry, prose and drama. May be repeated for credit when a different era is studied.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 336. American Ethnic Literature. 3 Credits.

The study of literature which examines the experience of ethnic groups in America, such as African, Asian, Hispanic, and Jewish Americans, and American Indians. May be repeated for credit when content is different.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 338. World Literatures. 3 Credits.

A study of selected works from world literatures. A variable content course.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 340. History of the English Language. 3 Credits.

The origins, development, and cultural background of pronunciation and spelling, grammar, vocabulary, meaning and usage in Old, Middle, and Modern English, including contemporary English dialects.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 160.

ENGLISH 344. African American Literature. 3 Credits.

Study of African American literature, exploring the aesthetic dimensions and cultural contexts of poetry, fiction, drama, and essays.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 364. Literary Topics. 3 Credits.

The study of topics, through literature, with a focus on individual and social values. Topics may include subjects (i.e., the natural environment, calamities), genres (i.e., memoirs, detective novels), and adaptations (i.e., Shakespeare and opera). May be repeated for credit when content is different.
P: jr st.

ENGLISH 431. Shakespeare. 3 Credits.

Study of a representative selection of Shakespeare's poetry and plays, including comedies, tragedies and histories.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 436. Major Author(s). 3 Credits.

Study of one or more important writers in British, Irish, or American literature.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

ENGLISH 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

ENGLISH 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

ENGLISH 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

ENGLISH 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Engineering Courses

ENGR 201. Engineering Materials. 4 Credits.

Basic behavior and processing of engineering materials, including metals and alloys, ceramics, and plastics.
P: CHEM 212.

ENGR 313. Mechanics I. 3 Credits.

Elementary vector operations, resultant of two- and three-dimensional force systems, centroid, hydrostatic forces, equilibrium of trusses and frames, laws of friction and impending motion, moments of inertia, virtual work, stability.
P: MATH 202.

ENGR 314. Mechanics II. 3 Credits.

Displacement, velocity and acceleration components, kinematics of particles using rectilinear and curvilinear coordinates, relative motion, solution and plane motion of rigid bodies, work and potential energy of particles and rigid bodies, linear and angular impulse and momentum, central force motion.
P: ENGR 313.

ENGR 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

Environmental Sciences Courses

ENV SCI 101. Introduction to Becoming a Scientist. 1 Credit.

Learn about the challenges and rewards of a science major. Acquire essential professional skills using electronic databases and spread sheets that are needed by science majors. Learn about current science and the culture of scientists.
P: Fr or So status only.

ENV SCI 102. Introduction to Environmental Sciences. 3 Credits.

Examines the interrelationships between people and their biophysical environment, including the atmosphere, water, rocks and soil, and other living organisms. The scientific analysis of nature and the social and political issues of natural resource use.

ENV SCI 141. Astronomy. 3 Credits.

A study of the solar system, stars, galaxies and universe.

ENV SCI 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

ENV SCI 207. Laboratory Safety. 1 Credit.

This course examines safety within the science laboratory with emphasis on practical application. Topics include current safety regulations, identification of hazards, chemical labeling and storage, waste management, personal protective equipment, ventilation, spill response, and biosafety.
P: BIOLOGY 202 or 203 or CHEM 108, 211 or 212 or HUM BIOL 204 or conc enr.

ENV SCI 260. Energy and Society. 3 Credits.

The issues relating energy and society rather than energy technology per se: global energy flows; sources of energy; energy-related problems, policy and conservation; energy growth; future scenarios.

ENV SCI 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

ENV SCI 301. Radioactivity: Past, Present, and Future. 3 Credits.

Radioactive isotopes play a significant role in many aspects of the natural and human environments. People are affected throughout their lives by natural and anthropogenic isotopes at local, national, and global scales. From radon in houses and radium in local drinking water supplies to fallout from Chernobyl, humans are directly impacted through health, economic, and technological pathways.
REC: HS chemistry or earth science, or GEOSCI 102 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 302. Principles of Ecology. 4 Credits.

Ecological principles governing interactions of plants and animals in their physical and biotic environments. Focuses on organisms and their environment, populations, communities, ecosystems, and global dimensions.
P: MATH 104 with at least a C grade or Math Placement of MATH 202 or greater; MATH 260 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade .

ENV SCI 303. Environmental Sustainability. 3 Credits.

Principles of environmental sustainability rooted in interdisciplinary and systems perspectives; sustainability of our natural resource system; natural chemical, physical and biological systems which affect and influence sustainable practices; politics and economics of environmental sustainability.
P: None; REC: ENV SCI 102.

ENV SCI 305. Environmental Systems. 4 Credits.

Physical and chemical aspects of natural environmental processes. The movement, transformation, and fate of materials and contaminants.
P: CHEM 212 with at least a C grade and GEOSCI 202 with at least a C grade and MATH 104 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 318. Pollution Control. 3 Credits.

Government regulations, manufacturing processes, waste minimization, pollution prevention methods and pollution control techniques of major industries.
P: CHEM 212 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 320. The Soil Environment. 4 Credits.

The physical, chemical and biological properties and principals of soils; formation, classification and distribution of major soil orders; function and management of soils in natural, agricultural and urban environments. Includes field and laboratory experiences.
P: CHEM 108 with at least a C grade or 212 with at least a C grade; REC: GEOSCI 202.

ENV SCI 323. Pollution Prevention. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes principles of pollution prevention and environmentally conscious products, processes and manufacturing systems. Also addresses post-use product disposal, life cycle analysis, and pollution prevention economics.
P: ENV SCI 318 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 325. Regional Climatology. 3 Credits.

The elements, controls, and classification of climates; the distribution of climate types over the earth; world patterns of climate.
P: GEOSCI 222 with at least a C grade or GEOG 222 with at least a C grade; REC: GEOSCI 202.

ENV SCI 330. Hydrology. 3 Credits.

Qualitative study of the principal elements of the water cycle, including precipitation, runoff, infiltration, evapotranspiration and ground water; applications to water resource projects such as low flow augmentation, flow reregulation, irrigation, public and industrial water supply and flood control.
P: GEOSCI 202 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 335. Water and Waste Water Treatment. 3 Credits.

Water and waste water treatment systems, including both sewage and potable water treatment plants and their associated collection and distribution systems. Study of the unit operations, physical, chemical and biological, used in both systems.
P: GEOSCI 202 with at least a C grade or CHEM 211 with at least a C grade or BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 336. Environmental Statistics. 2 Credits.

The course will give hands on experience in the management and analysis of environmental data using advanced statistical software. Students will handle environmental data and apply relevant statistical tools to summarize the dat, do tests of hypotheses concerning population means, variances, and proportions, and fit regression models for continuous and binary response variables.
P: MATH 260.

ENV SCI 337. Environmental GIS. 2 Credits.

This is a project based course where students conduct geospatial data manipulation, analysis and management with a suite of GIS software tools and web-based GIS interfaces. Students will learn about a range of applications of remotely sensed and other geospatial data to natural science problems. Through the course project, students will create a functional GIS to study or model an environmental phenomena or problem.
P: PU EN AF 250 REC: GEOSCI 202.

ENV SCI 338. Environmental Modeling. 2 Credits.

Creation and analysis of mathematical models describing environmental systems. How and where mathematical models are used in real life environmental applications. Students will create models and use them to analyze and interpret systems.
P: MATH 104, 202 or 203.

ENV SCI 339. Scientific Writing. 2 Credits.

This course focuses on key elements of scientific writing, including grammar, attention to audience, and building a logical argument. Students will develop their writing skills through mock grant applications, reports, and journal articles.

ENV SCI 370. Emergence of Western Technology. 3 Credits.

History of the shift in the technological balance of power from 16th century China, India and the Islamic world to western Europe and later to North America.
P: CHEM 108 or 211 or GEOSCI 102 or 202 or 222 or ENV SCI 102 or 141 or GEOG 222 or PHYSICS 141 or 103 or 180 or 201 and HUM STUD 101 or 201 all courses require at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 401. Stream Ecology. 4 Credits.

The goal of this course is to develop a profound understanding of the abiotic and biotic processes responsible for shaping the ecosystem in running waters. Focus will be on ecological processes, but nutrient dynamics and fluid mechanics are also important issues as well as the fauna associated to the streambed, mainly macro invertebrates and their ecological role. Theory will be combined with hands on experience providing the student with a tool to manage a stream based on ecological principles.
P: BIOLOGY 203.

ENV SCI 403. Limnology. 4 Credits.

Limnology is a broad sub-discipline of ecology that is the study of the structural and functional interrelationships of organisms of inland waters as they are affected by their dynamic physical, chemical and biotic environments. In this course, we will examine the dominant organizing principles and the current conceptual advances in the field of limnology focusing on lakes.
P: BIOLOGY 203.

ENV SCI 415. Solar and Alternate Energy Systems. 3 Credits.

Study of alternate energy systems which may be the important energy sources in the future, such as solar, wind, biomass, fusion, ocean thermal, fuel cells and magneto hydrodynamics.
P: PHYSICS 104 with at least a C grade or 202 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 421. Soils and Geology of Wisconsin Field Trip. 1-3 Credits.

Intensive three-day field study tour of the properties, origins and uses of major soils and landscapes of Wisconsin, with follow-up discussions. Cost of tour bus, guidebook, meals and lodging borne by student.
P: GEOSCI 202 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 425. Global Climate Change. 3 Credits.

Examines changes in global climate with emphasis on the processes by which climate change occurs. Focuses on the recent changes in the concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gases and their impact on the earth's global energy budget. Examines the potential environmental impact of a changed climate.
P: GEOSCI 222 with at least a C grade, GEOG 222 with at least a C grade or ENV SCI 102 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 432. Hydrogeology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the geological and physical principles governing ground water flow. Description of aquifer properties, chemical processes, equation of flow, well hydraulics, and environmental concerns.
P: GEOSCI 202 with at least a C grade; REC: ENV SCI 330 with at least a C grade; MATH 202.

ENV SCI 434. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting the composition of air and water. Chemical reactions in polluted, and unpolluted environments; dispersal processes and methods of control for various pollutants.
P: CHEM 311 with at least a C grade and 300 with at least a C grade; or CHEM 311 with at least a C grade and 302 with at least a C grade and 303 with at least a C grade.

ENV SCI 435. Environmental Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Basic measurement techniques used by environmental scientists to evaluate air and water quality; field methods, continuous monitoring techniques, and in-laboratory analysis techniques. Experiments demonstrate reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, thermodynamics instrumentation, and wet chemical methods.
P: CHEM 434 with at least a C grade or conc enr, or ENV SCI 434 or conc enr, or CHEM 311; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr of HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

ENV SCI 460. Resource Management Strategy. 3 Credits.

Application of the principles of systems analysis to the sustainable use of material and energy resources. Emphasis on use of analytical tools of economics (e.g. costs-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and risk-benefit analysis) and the process of public policy making and implementation.
REC: background in econ and conservation.

ENV SCI 467. Capstone in Environmental Science. 4 Credits.

A project-based course in which students address a practical application of scientific and mathematics skills in the environmental sciences. Topics vary.
P: ENV SCI 302 with at least a C grade or 305 with at least a C grade, and MATH 260 with at least a C grade. REC: ENV SCI 302 and 305.

ENV SCI 469. Conservation Biology. 4 Credits.

Overview of the major issues and ecological principles underlying the field of conservation of biology, including patterns and measurement of biological diversity from genetic to community scales.
P: ENV SCI 302 with at least a C grade or consent of instructor.

ENV SCI 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

ENV SCI 491. Senior Thesis/Research in Environmental Science. 3-4 Credits.

A project-based capstone experience where individual students address a specific aspect of the environmental sciences through the use of scientific and mathematical skills.
P: ENV SCI 302 with at least a C grade or 305 with at least a C grade; MATH 260 with at least a C grade; instr consent. REC: ENV SCI 302 and 305.

ENV SCI 492. Practicum in Environmental Science. 1-4 Credits.

A project-based course in which students address a practical application of scientific and mathematics skills in the environmental sciences. Topics vary.
P: ENV SCI 302 with at least a C grade or 305 with at least a C grade, and MATH 260 with at least a C grade. REC: ENV SCI 302 and 305.

ENV SCI 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings. All internships must be taken P-NC.
P: jr st and gpa > or = 2.75 and completion of 3 UL cses in maj or min.

ENV SCI 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

ENV SCI 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

ENV SCI 505. Environmental Systems. 4 Credits.

Physical and chemical aspects of natural environmental processes. The movement, transformation, and fate of materials and contaminants.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 518. Pollution Control. 3 Credits.

Government regulations, manufacturing processes, waste minimization, pollution prevention methods and pollution control techniques of major industries.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 520. The Soil Environment. 4 Credits.

The physical, chemical and biological properties and principals of soils; formation, classification and distribution of major soil orders; function and management of soils in natural, agricultural and urban environments. Includes field and laboratory experiences.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 523. Pollution Prevention. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes principles of pollution prevention and environmentally conscious products, processes and manufacturing systems. Also addresses post-use product disposal, life cycle analysis, and pollution prevention economics.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 530. Hydrology. 3 Credits.

Qualitative study of the principal elements of the water cycle, including precipitation, runoff, infiltration, evapotranspiration and ground water; applications to water resource projects such as low flow augmentation, flow reregulation, irrigation, public and industrial water supply and flood control.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 535. Water and Waste Water Treatment. 3 Credits.

Water and waste water treatment systems, including both sewage and potable water treatment plants and their associated collection and distribution systems. Study of the unit operations, physical, chemical and biological, used in both systems.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 557. Environmental GIS. 2 Credits.

This is a project based course where students conduct geospatial data manipulation, analysis and management with a suite of GIS software tools and web-based GIS interfaces. Students will learn about a range of applications of remotely sensed and other geospatial data to natural science problems. Through the course project, students will create a functional GIS to study or model an environmental phenomena or problem.
P: Graduate status and previous GIS experience.

ENV SCI 563. Plants and Forest Pathology. 3 Credits.

Important diseases of forest, shade and orchard trees and diseases of representative economic plants; fungus deterioration in wood storage, its economic importance and methods of control.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 601. Stream Ecology. 4 Credits.

The goal of this course is to develop a profound understanding of the abiotic and biotic processes responsible for shaping the ecosystem in running waters. Focus will be on ecological processes, but nutrient dynamics and fluid mechanics are also important issues as well as the fauna associated to the streambed, mainly macro invertebrates and their ecological role. Theory will be combined with hands on experience providing the student with a tool to manage a stream based on ecological principles.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 603. Limnology. 4 Credits.

Limnology is a broad sub-discipline of ecology that is the study of the structural and functional interrelationships of organisms of inland waters as they are affected by their dynamic physical, chemical and biotic environments. In this course, we will examine the dominant organizing principles and the current conceptual advances in the field of limnology focusing on lakes.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 605. Aquatic Ecology. 4 Credits.

An introduction to a diversity of freshwater systems, including streams, wetlands, reservoirs and lakes. The lab involves sampling of lakes and streams in eastern Wisconsin for biological and chemical analysis.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 615. Solar and Alternate Energy Systems. 3 Credits.

Study of alternate energy systems which may be the important energy sources in the future, such as solar, wind, biomass, fusion, ocean thermal, fuel cells and magneto hydrodynamics.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 621. Soils and Geology of Wisconsin Field Trip. 1-3 Credits.

Intensive three-day field study tour of the properties, origins and uses of major soils and landscapes of Wisconsin, with follow-up discussions. Cost of tour bus, guidebook, meals and lodging borne by student.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 632. Hydrogeology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the geological and physical principles governing ground water flow. Description of aquifer properties, chemical processes, equation of flow, well hydraulics, and environmental concerns.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 634. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting the composition of air and water. Chemical reactions in polluted, and unpolluted environments; dispersal processes and methods of control for various pollutants.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 635. Environmental Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Basic measurement techniques used by environmental scientists to evaluate air and water quality; field methods, continuous monitoring techniques, and in-laboratory analysis techniques. Experiments demonstrate reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, thermodynamics instrumentation, and wet chemical methods.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 654. Remote Sensing and GIS. 4 Credits.

Large area, small scale analysis of earth surface features by satellite imagery and data. Manual and computer-assisted manipulation of multispectral images with respect to vegetation, geology, soils, water resources and land use.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 660. Resource Management Strategy. 3 Credits.

Application of the principles of systems analysis to the sustainable use of material and energy resources. Emphasis on use of analytical tools of economics (e.g. costs-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and risk-benefit analysis) and the process of public policy making and implementation.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 668. Ecological Applications. 4 Credits.

Application of ecological knowledge to the management of natural and human dominated environments, including consideration of agroecosystems, forest, wetland and riparian ecosystems. Attention given to ecology and management of harvestable species, endangered species, non-indigenous species and indigenous pest species. Introduction to the fields of ecotoxicology, ecological risk assessment and ecological economics as they relate to ecosystem management.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 669. Conservation Biology. 4 Credits.

Overview of the major issues and ecological principles underlying the field of conservation of biology, including patterns and measurement of biological diversity from genetic to community scales.
P: gr st.

ENV SCI 699. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

French Courses

FRENCH 101. Introduction to the French Language I. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in French.

FRENCH 102. Introduction to the French Language II. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in French.
P: none; REC: 1 yr h.s. or 1 sem college French.

FRENCH 201. Intermediate French Language I. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read and speak French.
P: none; REC: 2 yrs h.s. or 2 sem college French.

FRENCH 202. Intermediate French Language II. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read and speak French.
P: none; REC: 3 yrs h.s. or 3 sem college French.

FRENCH 225. Intermediate French Conversation and Composition. 3 Credits.

Development of greater fluency through classroom practice in conversation and composition.
P: none; REC: 4 yrs h.s. or 4 sem college French.

FRENCH 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

FRENCH 325. Advanced French Conversation and Composition. 3 Credits.

Continues development of fluency through intensive practice and study of the spoken and written language. Stresses accurate use of grammatical structures and sensitivity to differences in style, tone and levels of language from colloquial to formal.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 329. Representative French Authors. 3 Credits.

Important novels, plays, poems, and essays representative of major eras and movements of French society foster appreciation of the language and understanding of the literature and culture. Includes different styles of writing and differing treatment of recurring themes. Offered in the language. May be repeated for credit when different subtitle is studied.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 333. Literary Themes. 3 Credits.

Explores a single theme such as fantasy, war, revolution, love, alienation, through the literature of one or many nations. May be repeated for credit when a different theme is studied.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 345. Advanced French Grammar and Translation. 3 Credits.

In-depth review and continued study of French grammar, including fundamentals of comparative English-French grammar, and basic principles of translation from French into English and English into French.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 346. French Phonetics and Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

Intensive study of French sound system to improve accuracy of pronunciation and intonation. Different accents studies. Intonation patterns needed for different social situations practiced.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 354. France Today. 3 Credits.

Aspects of French history and traditional customs and values of contemporary French culture, including rural and urban life, industry and commerce, art and music, etc.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 355. Le Monde Francophone. 3 Credits.

A study of the French-speaking (francophone) world outside of France. Students will become familiar with essential features of the geography, history, and culture of francophone countries on five continents.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 367. Business French. 3 Credits.

Students read and discuss business articles and correspondence, cultural aspects of business communication. Areas include banking, correspondence, import-export, computers.
P: FRENCH 225.

FRENCH 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

FRENCH 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.

FRENCH 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

FRENCH 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Geography Courses

GEOG 102. World Regions and Concepts: A Geographic Analysis. 3 Credits.

Contemporary geography, its viewpoints and methodology; geographic reality of the present-day world is analyzed through case studies using both the regional approach and systematic analysis.

GEOG 202. Introduction to Cultural Geography. 3 Credits.

The impact of culture through time in creating the earth's contrasting landscapes, using case studies which often focus on North America.

GEOG 210. Human Geography and Concepts. 3 Credits.

This course introduces you to some of the major topics and models studied in human geography. Specifically, this course will examine the global patterns of population, culture, economic and political systems, and the interconnectedness at the international, national, and sub-national scales.

GEOG 222. Ocean of Air: Weather and Climate. 3 Credits.

Fundamental processes of the atmosphere, the resulting weather and climate, and the effects of the atmosphere on other aspects of the earth's environments and on humans.

GEOG 223. Ocean of Air: Weather and Climate Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany GEOSCI 222 / Geog 222. Application of physical principles learned in lecture through a combination of data analysis, problem solving, and experimentation.
P: conc enr in Earth Sc/Geog 222 lec.

GEOG 250. Displays of Geographic Information. 3 Credits.

The appreciation, use, and evaluation of maps and air photos as informational sources.

GEOG 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

GEOG 321. Coastal Resources Policy and Management. 3 Credits.

The importance of coastal resources, with an emphasis on Wisconsin's coasts. With field trips to local lakes and Lake Superior, we will study issues of development, overuse, risk, and their consequent environmental, aesthetic and economic impacts.

GEOG 325. Regional Climatology. 3 Credits.

The elements, controls, and classification of climates; the distribution of climate types over the earth; world patterns of climate.
P: GEOSCI 222 with at least a C grade or GEOG 222 with at least a C grade; REC: GEOSCI 202.

GEOG 341. The City and its Regional Context. 3 Credits.

The course will focus on two main interrelated themes in urban geography. It will explore urban places as systems operating as en entity among other cities and the surrounding region. Second, it will explore social construction of urban morphology.
P: jr st.

GEOG 342. Settlement Geography. 3 Credits.

Evolution of major human settlement forms, emphasizing geographical patterns in the United States and including relationships between house form and culture, the arrangement of habitations on the landscape, and the historical geography of urban settlements.
P: jr st and GEOG 202.

GEOG 350. GIS in Public and Environmental Policy. 2 Credits.

Uses state-of-the-art software to integrate digitized data maps, transfer data, manage relational data bases, overlay maps, display, query, edit interactive graphics, and geocode addresses. Focus is upon GIS applications tailored to public and environmental policy, e.g., tax base analysis, property mapping, natural resources inventory, crime demography, transportation routing, natural hazards, and emergency management.
P: PU EN AF 250.

GEOG 351. Elements of Cartography. 3 Credits.

Principles of basic cartography, including problem identification and clarification, data collection and analysis, compilation, generalization, and symbolization; presentation of data on medium and large scale maps.
P: sophomore standing.

GEOG 353. Air Photo Interpretation. 3 Credits.

Techniques for the interpretation of human and natural land use. Wide variety of aerial photo formats and scales are used. Vertical and oblique photos, satellite images, and Internet web sites incorporated into course material.
P: sophomore standing.

GEOG 370. Geography of South America. 3 Credits.

A survey course which will explore the physical features, resources, people, and the political economy of the American southern hemisphere.
P: jr st; REC: ENV SCI 102 or GEOG 222.

GEOG 421. Soils and Geology of Wisconsin Field Trip. 1-3 Credits.

Intensive three-day field study tour of the properties, origins and uses of major soils and landscapes of Wisconsin, with follow-up discussions. Cost of tour bus, guidebook, meals and lodging borne by student.
P: GEOSCI 202 with at least a C grade.

GEOG 450. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credits.

Project-based course using ArcGIS. Students define a project, develop a database, analyze spatial data, and develop GIS maps displaying results of their analysis.
P: GEOG 350 or PU EN AF 350.

GEOG 470. Quaternary Geology. 3 Credits.

Understanding the extremes in environmental behavior which characterize Pleistocene time. Principles of glaciology and the impact of glaciation on the landscape.
P: GEOSCI 202 with at least a C grade; REC: GEOSCI 203.

GEOG 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

GEOG 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

GEOG 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

German Courses

GERMAN 101. Introduction to the German Language I. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in German.

GERMAN 102. Introduction to the German Language II. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in German.
P: none; REC: 1 yr h.s. or 1 sem college German.

GERMAN 201. Intermediate German Language I. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read and speak German.
P: none; REC: 2 yrs h.s. or 2 sem college German.

GERMAN 202. Intermediate German Language II. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read and speak German.
P: none; REC: 3 yrs h.s. or 3 sem college German.

GERMAN 225. Intermediate German Conversation and Composition. 3 Credits.

Development of greater fluency through classroom practice in conversation and composition.
P: none; REC: 4 yrs h.s. or 4 sem college German.

GERMAN 285. Study Abroad: Germany. 3-15 Credits.

P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

GERMAN 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

GERMAN 325. Advanced German Conversation and Composition. 3 Credits.

Continues development of fluency through intensive practice and study of the spoken and written language. Stresses accurate use of grammatical structures and sensitivity to differences in style, tone and levels of language from colloquial to formal.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 329. Representative German Authors. 3 Credits.

Important novels, plays, poems, and essays representative of major eras and movements of German society foster appreciation of the language and understanding of the literature and culture. Includes different styles of writing and differing treatment of recurring themes. Offered in the language. May repeat for credit if different authors are studied.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 333. Literary Themes. 3 Credits.

Explores a single theme such as fantasy, war, revolution, love, alienation, through the literature of one or many nations. May be repeated for credit when a different theme is studied.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 335. Literary Eras. 3 Credits.

Studies the works of a number of writers in relation to their time; includes poetry, prose and drama. May be repeated for credit when a different era is studied.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 345. Advanced German Grammar. 3 Credits.

This course will assist students in improving their overall language proficiency by focusing on more challenging aspects of German syntax and semantics.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 350. Major German Drama. 3 Credits.

Study of German drama either by period or by theme. May be repeated for credit when content is different.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 351. Major German Prose Fiction. 3 Credits.

Study of German short story and/or novels either by period or by theme.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 352. Major German Poetry. 3 Credits.

Study of German poetry either by period or by theme.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 355. Deutsche Kultur und Landeskunde. 3 Credits.

Expands students' linguistic and cultural proficiency in German through discussion of German history, politics and the arts.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 356. German Culture. 3 Credits.

The culture of the German-speaking world from the earliest periods to the present with a focus on how contemporary Germany has been shaped by issues of history, religion, art, music, philosophy, and commerce.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 357. German Cinema. 3 Credits.

Historical and critical introduction to the work of prominent German filmmakers and to cinematic representations of German culture.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 420. Business German. 3 Credits.

Examines business culture and practices in the German speaking world. Practical exercises, including specialized vocabulary for telephoning, writing business correspondence and a German CV, are combined with an analysis of German corporate structures, industry, labor, management, banking, marketing and advertising.
P: GERMAN 225.

GERMAN 425. German Translation Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of translating both into and from modern German. Through readings in translation theory and comparative linguistics as well as through group work, students will become aware of the structures and nuances of both languages.
P: GERMAN 225; REC: GERMAN 345.

GERMAN 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

GERMAN 485. Study Abroad: Germany. 3-15 Credits.

A semester of study at the University of Kassel in Germany. Students register before departing; upon return, they must submit descriptions of courses taken, evaluations from professors, a formal certificate, and a letter grade.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

GERMAN 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.

GERMAN 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

GERMAN 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

History Courses

HISTORY 101. Foundations of Western Culture I. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of Western Civilization. This course covers ancient civilization through the Renaissance.

HISTORY 102. Foundations of Western Culture II. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of Western Civilization. This covers the Renaissance up to the present.

HISTORY 103. World Civilizations I. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of various world civilizations. This course covers the origins of civilization to the Age of Exploration.

HISTORY 104. World Civilizations II. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art and culture of various world civilizations. This course covers the Age of Exploration up to the present.

HISTORY 205. American History to 1865. 3 Credits.

This course explores early American and United States history through 1865, with attention to politics, society, economy, culture, and gender. Following an overview of Turtle Island (a Native designation for North America) before European contact, likely topics to be considered include the European colonization process; the creation and expansion of the United States; the evolution of formal and informal democratic institutions; Native resistance, accommodation, and persistence; the rise and fall of the institution of African slavery in the Atlantic world; early industrialization; and the causes and outcomes of the Civil War.

HISTORY 206. History of the United States from 1865 to the Present. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of the United States since 1865, with attention to politics, society, economy, and culture. Likely topics to be considered include: the African-American freedom struggle during Reconstruction and the Jim Crow era; the conquest of the trans-Mississippi west; industrialization and labor conflict; immigration; the expansion of American military and economic power around the world, including participation in the First World War, the Second World War, and the global Cold War; the growth of state power; urbanization and suburbanization; feminism, women's rights, civil rights, and other social movements; and the rise of conservatism since the 1970s.

HISTORY 207. Introduction to African-American History. 3 Credits.

Survey of black people's experience in America, beginning with African culture through the development of Afro-American culture and institutions; includes political, social, economic and cultural history.

HISTORY 220. American Environmental History. 3 Credits.

This course offers an introduction to environmental history - the study of the historical relationship between humans and the natural world - with a focus on North America from before European contact up to contemporary times. Likely topics to be considered include: First Nations' relationships with nature and land use patterns prior to European contact; the massive environmental changes that came with the arrival of European colonizers; changing ideas about the proper relationships between humans and nature; and major developments in resource use and management, including the rise of the modern environmental movement in the late 20th century and contemporary environmental problems and challenges.

HISTORY 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HISTORY 301. The Middle Ages. 3 Credits.

Examines Western European history from the late Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Focuses on primary sources and the writings of medieval historians.
P: HUM STUD 101 or 201.

HISTORY 302. Problems in American Thought. 3 Credits.

Selected themes and topics in the history of American thought and culture from the 17th century to the present. May be repeated for credit when different content is offered.
P: jr st.

HISTORY 309. United States Immigration History. 3 Credits.

This course surveys American Immigration History with a special focus on ethnic and race relations. It emphasizes social issues relating to immigration, immigration laws, and multiculturalism.
P: HISTORY 205 and 206.

HISTORY 310. American Colonial History. 3 Credits.

History of North America from the sixteenth century through the late eighteenth century, with an emphasis on interactions among American Indians, Europeans, and Africans, and attention to society, politics, economy, and culture.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 311. History of Wisconsin. 3 Credits.

Wisconsin history from European exploration to the present; development of Wisconsin as part of the international Great Lakes region and the United States; political, economic and cultural history of the region, territory and state.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 312. The Early American Republic. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the political, economic, social, and religious development of the early U.S., from the American revolution to the war with Mexico.
P: Jr st; REC: HISTORY 205.

HISTORY 322. Economic and Business History of the U.S.. 3 Credits.

Development of a corporate economy and the rise of government intervention; industrial, financial, agricultural and labor reorganizations; wage and price policies and their relationship to these general themes; modernization and urbanization and the relationship between the domestic and world economy.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 330. Early Modern Europe. 3 Credits.

This course examines key religious and political narratives as well as major social and cultural phenomena in Europe c.1500-1750. Topics include religious reform, popular culture, pan-European conflict, sexuality and the family, and the rise of the absolutist state.

HISTORY 332. Europe in the 19th Century. 3 Credits.

Europe in the 19th-century surveys of European history during the 19th century. We will consider the poiltical, economic, social, and cultural developments that occurred in Europe during this time and discuss such topics as revolution, Napoleon Bonaparte, industrialization, liveralism, socialism, nationalism, Romanticism, political and social reform, 1848, Realism, national unification, imperialism, urbanization, modernism, and the road to World War I.
P: None; REC: jr. st.

HISTORY 333. Europe in the 20th Century. 3 Credits.

Europe in the 20th-century surveys European history from 1900 until 1999. We will consider the political, economic, social, and cultural developments that occurred in Europe during this time and discuss such topics as World War I, the Russian Revolution, modernism, facism, communism, world War II, the Holocaust, the Cold War, decolonization, the welfare state, 1968, 1989, and the European Union.
REC: jr st.

HISTORY 337. The Rise of Islamic Civilization to 1800. 3 Credits.

Examines the origins of Islam and Islamic civilization and its dispersion throughout Eurasia from 600 to 1800 AD.
P: Hum Stud/History 101 or Hum Stud/History 103, So standing.

HISTORY 340. Topics in African American History. 3 Credits.

Each semester of the course will explore a significant topic in African American history such as the civil rights movements, Black nationalism, the African American family, alienation, and affirmation.
P: HISTORY 207.

HISTORY 353. The U.S. and the World. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the United States' interactions with the larger world, including its experiments with imperialism, interventionism, and multilateralism, from 1898 to the present. Through our study of both United States foreign policy and the engagement of Americans with global and transnational issues such as the spread of democracy, free trade, peace, human rights, and environmentalism, we will critical gain insights into the democratic ideals of the United States and their implications for the larger global community.
P: HISTORY 206 or POL SCI 100 or POL SCI 101.

HISTORY 354. History of Modern East Asia. 3 Credits.

Modern East Asian history since the late nineteenth century, including China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. The course examines political, social, and cultural changes in the region and emphasizes the East Asian response to encounters with the West.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 356. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of modern Africa from 1850 to the present, concentrating on the major political issues faced by the various peoples of Africa from European colonialism onward. We will discuss the development of European colonization, the gradual integration of Africa into the global community, the struggle for liberation, the Cold War in Africa, and modern challenges of post-colonial Africa including civil war, genocide, HIV/AIDS, poverty, and the consequences of colonization.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 358. Political History of Modern Latin America. 3 Credits.

This course adopts a comparative historical approach to the study of modern Latin American politics and society in the twentieth century. The main themes concentrate on the origins of repressive dictatorships, indigenous resistance, revolutionary movements, United States intervention, and the challenge of democracy.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 360. Ancient Greece. 3 Credits.

This course traces the development of Ancient Greek civilization from its origins in the Ancient Near East until its conquests by Rome. Includes social, political, intellectual, economic, and cultural history.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 361. Ancient Rome. 3 Credits.

This course traces the development of Roman civilization from its Etruscan origins through Late Antiquity. Includes social, political, intellectual, economic, and cultural history.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 370. History of Sexuality in the U.S.. 3 Credits.

Historical introduction to sexual behaviors and attitudes in the U.S. from the period of colonization to the present. Includes analyses of the impact of economic, racial, gender, political, and technological change on sexual norms and behaviors.
P: DJS/WOST 241 or HISTORY 205 or 206.

HISTORY 380. U.S. Women's History. 3 Credits.

In this course our goal is a richer understanding of women's experiences in the past, ranging from pregnancy and single motherhood to women's struggles to win the right to vote. Through lectures, discussions and films we will explore a variety of women's lives, consider the ways studying women changes our historical perspectives and focus on how interpretations of the past influence our understanding of current social issues.
P: none; REC: jr st and one cse in U.S. history, U.S. lit or Women's Studies.

HISTORY 402. America in the Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

Examines the history of the United States during the Twentieth Century, emphasizing social, political, and economic themes and issues.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HISTORY 420. Topics in Ancient History. 3 Credits.

Variable content. Course will explore a topic, issue, problem or controversy in ancient history such as the ancient economy, Augustus, or daily life in the Roman world. Emphasis on primary sources.
P: none; REC: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 421. Topics in Medieval History. 3 Credits.

Examines themes of the Medieval world, such as the Viking Diaspora, Medieval Russia, the Silk Road, and the Byzantine Empire.
P: HUM STUD 101.

HISTORY 422. Topics in Early Modern European History. 3 Credits.

The course will explore current topics and themes with European history between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. Possible topics include the witch persecutions, crime and punishment, British history and the history of society and gender.
P: HUM STUD 101 or 102; jr st.

HISTORY 423. Topics in Modern European History. 3 Credits.

This course will examine selected topics in European history since 1789. Sample topics might include the French Revolution, the Bourgeoisie, Existentialism, the World Wars, Nazi Germany, Youth, or Popular Culture.
P: jr st. REC: HUM STUD 102.

HISTORY 450. War and Civilization. 3 Credits.

Examination of key aspects and debates concerning the nature and role of warfare in society over a broad range of cultures and time periods.
P: jr st. REC: HUM STUD 101 and 102.

HISTORY 470. Studies in Comparative History. 3 Credits.

Selected themes and topics in comparative history crossing geographic and temporal boundaries. Possible topics include empires, nomadic societies, the Silk Road, slavery, the Atlantic World, democracy, modern Germany and Japan, and revolutions.
P: jr st.

HISTORY 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

HISTORY 480. Seminar in History. 3 Credits.

Theoretical and practical topics and problems such as research techniques, source materials, comparative studies, analysis and interpretation, and the writing of historical inquiries.
P:Jr st.

HISTORY 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

HISTORY 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

HISTORY 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Human Biology Courses

HUM BIOL 101. Introduction to Becoming a Scientist. 1 Credit.

Learn about the challenges and rewards of a science major. Acquire essential professional skills using electronic databases and spread sheets that are needed by science majors. Learn about current science and the culture of scientists.
P: Fr or So status only.

HUM BIOL 102. Introduction to Human Biology. 3 Credits.

Basic concepts, principles, and processes in human biology; the origin of life, evolution, cells, population, genetics, reproduction, disease, the anatomy and function of major organ systems in humans.

HUM BIOL 116. First Aid and Emergency Care Procedures. 3 Credits.

Student will learn all aspects of first aid training such as victim assessment and treating all types of illnesses and injuries; all skills for Professional Rescuer CPR; dealing with infectious diseases and their transmission.

HUM BIOL 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

HUM BIOL 202. Ethnic Minorities in Science. 3 Credits.

The history and culture of science in the US will be examined, in order to understand what has led to the current under-representation of ethnic minorities in science. The often overlooked contributions of scientists who are members of ethnic minorities will be recognized.

HUM BIOL 204. Anatomy and Physiology. 5 Credits.

This lecture and laboratory course examines the fundamental structure and function of tissues, organs, and systems of the human body.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

HUM BIOL 205. Biotechnology and Human Values. 3 Credits.

Examination of technological developments in biology and medicine, including genetic, behavioral, and organism modification and the moral and ethical concerns raised by such technologies.
P: HUM BIOL 102 or BIOLOGY 202.

HUM BIOL 206. Fertility, Reproduction, and Family Planning. 3 Credits.

Factors that influence reproduction and fertility, i.e., physiological, psychological, social, cultural, and ethical; the methods available for limiting or increasing reproduction; the nature of family planning programs.
P: HUM BIOL 102 or BIOLOGY 202.

HUM BIOL 207. Laboratory Safety. 1 Credit.

This course examines safety within the science laboratory with emphasis on practical application. Topics include current safety regulations, identification of hazards, chemical labeling and storage, waste management, personal protective equipment, ventilation, spill response, and biosafety.
P: BIOLOGY 202 or 203 or CHEM 108, 211 or 212 or HUM BIOL 204 or conc enr.

HUM BIOL 208. Scientific Conditioning of the Athlete. 2 Credits.

Interrelationships between growth and development and athletic participation by pre-adolescents, principles of physiology of exercise, and general and specific techniques of physical and psychological conditioning are studied.
P: HUM BIOL 102 with a grade of C or better OR BIOLOGY 202 with a grade of C or better.

HUM BIOL 210. Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries. 3 Credits.

Prevention, physical conditioning, strapping, properly fitted and designed equipment, condition of the competition site, conduct of practices, and respect of existing injuries; estimation the nature an extent of the injury, feasibility of moving the victim, immediate care at the scene, modes of required transport, sideline care, training room modalities, referral for definite diagnosis, and treatment of simple follow-up rehabilitation.
P: HUM BIOL 102 with a grade of C or better OR BIOLOGY 202 with a grade of C or better.

HUM BIOL 217. Human Disease and Society. 3 Credits.

Impact of diseases in humans. Emphasizes the major diseases, their causes, individual effects, historical significance, and methods of control.

HUM BIOL 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HUM BIOL 310. Human Genetics. 3 Credits.

The molecular basis of heredity, genetic diseases, and genetic technologies including cloning, genetic testing, and gene therapy will be evaluated.
P: BIOLOGY 202 wiith at least a C grade ; CHEM 108 or 212 with at least a C grade.

HUM BIOL 324. The Biology of Women. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the physiology of the adult female body and will address health issues that are unique to or different in women. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of female sex hormones on multiple processes (reproductive, nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular) in the body.
P: HUM BIOL 102 with at least a C grade or BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade.

HUM BIOL 331. Science and Religion: Spirit of Inquiry. 3 Credits.

This course examines the differing world views of science and religion; origins of science in the Judeo-Christian West; sources of conflicts; domains of validity; and of limitations of science and religion. This course may not be used as upper-level elective credits for a Human Biology major or minor.
P: HUM BIOL 102 with at least a C grade or BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; and sophomore status.

HUM BIOL 333. Principles of Sports Physiology. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes the applied aspects of (exercise) physiology. Major topics include physiological dimensions of athletic performance/fatigue, principles of training, gender and exercise, ergogenic aids, and environmental stress and exercise.
P: HUM BIOL 204 with at least a C grade; OR BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade. REC: HUM BIOL 350.

HUM BIOL 350. Exercise Physiology. 4 Credits.

This course provides a physiological emphasis of the cardiorespiratory, muscular, and hormonal/metabolic responses to acute exercise and to chronic exercise training. The laboratory involves measurement and analysis of a variety of parameters related to physical exercise, e.g., blood pressure, EKG, oxygen consumption, and body composition.
P: Declared major or minor in Human Biology AND Math 260 AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

HUM BIOL 351. Kinesiology. 4 Credits.

This course provides an in depth study of the human musculoskeletal system as it pertains to movement of the body and/or its parts. There are three major components to this course - anatomy (detailed musculoskeletal anatomy), functional anatomy (understanding bodily movement in light of anatomical structure), and biomechanics (mathematical quantification of bodily movement, forces, etc.)
P: Declared major or minor in Human Biology AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

HUM BIOL 401. Art and Science. 1 Credit.

Examination of art and science as ways of knowking, including discussion of various points of view regarding the differences and similarities between the two.
P: HUM BIOL 102 or BIOLOGY 202 or BIOLOGY 203.

HUM BIOL 402. Human Physiology. 3 Credits.

This course examines the physiologic functions of the major human organ systems. Topics include cell physiology; muscle, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, digestive, immune, and reproductive system functions; hormonal regulation pathways; and the role of physiology in diseases and medicine.
P: HUM BIOL 204 with at least a C grade; OR BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade and BIOLOGY 203 with at least a C grade; OR transfer cse Biology 002; AND Chem 108 with at least a C grade or 212 with at least a C grade.

HUM BIOL 403. Human Physiology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

This course examines fundamental physiologic principles in a laboratory setting. Topics will include histology; muscle and nerve functions; respiratory and cardiac functions; and urinary system function. Students will gain experience in the process of designing, evaluating and presenting experimental results and develop skills in the reading of scientific literature.
P: Declared major or minor in Hum Biology; AND HUM BIOL 402 with at least a C grade or conc enr or BIOLOGY 346 with at least a C grade or conc enr; AND Math 260; AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

HUM BIOL 405. Biotechnology and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Examination of the science and ethics of biotechnology including genomics, eugenics, recombinant DNA technology, reproductive technology, stem cells, drugs, modified organisms, and treatment of diseases.
P: none; REC: HUM BIOL 102 or BIOLOGY 202.

HUM BIOL 413. Neurobiology. 3 Credits.

This course will cover the physiological and molecular mechanisms of nervous system function. Topics include neuroanatomy; development and differentiation of neuronal cells; chemical and electrical functions; synaptic pharmacology; sensory receptors; learning and memory; and various disease states and medical treatments.
P: BIOLOGY 303 with at least a C grade; and HUM BIOL 402 with at least a C grade or BIOLOGY 346 with at least a C grade.

HUM BIOL 422. Immunology. 3 Credits.

This course examines the mechanisms of vertebrate, particularly human defense against microbial invasion and cancer.
P: BIOLOGY 302 with at least a C grade or 307 with at least a C grade; CHEM 212 with at least a C grade; and MATH 260 with at least a C grade.

HUM BIOL 423. Immunology Lab. 1 Credit.

This laboratory course examines the mechanisms of innate and acquired immunity.
P: HUM BIOL 422 or conc enr AND ENV SCI 207 or conc enr of HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

HUM BIOL 426. Cancer Biology. 3 Credits.

This course examines the genetic changes and molecular events that lead to abnormal cell growth and cancer. Topics covered include oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, cancer stem cells, therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment, and cancer prevention.
P: HUM BIOL 310 or BIOLOGY 303 with at least a C grade.

HUM BIOL 427. Cancer Biology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

In this inquiry-based laboratory course, students will use molecular and cellular techniques to conduct research projects that examine the hallmark characteristics of cancer cells.
P: HUM BIOL 426 or concurrent enrollment.

HUM BIOL 444. Endocrinology. 3 Credits.

This course examines the major endocrine organs of the body and the processes that are controlled / integrated by hormones. Clinical examples of endocrine disease (e.g. diabetes, Graves disease) will be considered from the viewpoint of the insight they give to the understanding of endocrine physiology.
P: HUM BIOL 402 with a C grade or better.

HUM BIOL 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

HUM BIOL 495. Research in Human Biology. 1-5 Credits.

Work closely with a faculty member to plan, perform, evaluate, and report on laboratory research in human biology or a related field.
P: HUM BIOL 207 or ENV SCI 207 and approval by faculty mentor.

HUM BIOL 497. Internship. 1-16 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

HUM BIOL 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

HUM BIOL 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HUM BIOL 602. Human Physiology. 3 Credits.

Physiological functions of major human organs other than central nervous system: cell physiology, enzymes, cell energetics; muscle function; autonomic nervous system; endocrine system; blood, oxygen and circulatory system; immune system; kidney, digestion; and the role of physiology in diseases and medicine.
P: gr st.

Human Development Courses

HUM DEV 102. Introduction to Human Development. 3 Credits.

Human development from conception through death: physical development, social and emotional development, personality development, the development of language, intellectual development and creativity, and the process of human learning.

HUM DEV 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

HUM DEV 225. Career Planning. 1 Credit.

Provides students with the knowledge and resources necessary for effective career decision-making in college. The class sessions and assignments focus on self-assessment, learning and applying career development theories, exploring major and career options, and establishing goals for career/life planning.

HUM DEV 283B. Phoenix GPS Program Fall Workshop. 1 Credit.

This course serves as a weekly workshop for GPS sections of First Year Seminars. Each week GPS students will learn from expert faculty and staff how to be successful in and get the most out of college (like how to take good notes, study for college-level courses and effectively manage your stress) and get information on many of the opportunities at UW-Green Bay (like study abroad, performing arts, and getting involved in campus organizations). Students will also have the opportunity to practice the skills they're learning in lab, develop plans for how to effectively utilize this information in their college work, and reflect on how they plan to utilize the information and skills to maximize college and personal success.
P: concurrent enrollment in one of the five sections of GPS First Year Seminar Course AND HUM BIOL 102-0001.

HUM DEV 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HUM DEV 302. Developmental Research Methods. 4 Credits.

A survey of research methods used by developmental researchers. These methods investigate developmental phenomena across the lifespan. Topics will include: the role of research in understanding human development, common methods for research at different phases of the lifespan, and how to assess developmental change.
P: HUM DEV 102; COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260 or BUS ADM 216 or BUS ADM 215 & BUS ADM 217.

HUM DEV 331. Infancy and Early Childhood. 3 Credits.

Current theories, methods of study and research in the study of human development from conception through the early childhood years, and the interrelationships among biological, social, and psychological aspects of development.
P: HUM DEV 102 or PSYCH 102; REC: HUM DEV 302.

HUM DEV 332. Middle Childhood and Adolescence. 3 Credits.

Individual development from the elementary school years through adolescence: socio-cultural, psychological and physical growth factors in the developmental process of the older child and adolescent. Stresses interpretation of behavior from the perspectives of such theorists as Erikson and Piaget.
P: HUM DEV 102 or PSYCH 102; REC: HUM DEV 331 or equiv.

HUM DEV 336. Gender Development Across the Lifespan. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary analysis of changes in biological, social, and identity development for males and females throughout the life span.
P: HUM DEV 102 or Soc C D 241. REC: COMM SCI 301.

HUM DEV 342. Cross Cultural Human Development. 3 Credits.

Cultural differences in perception, cognition, language and thought, child development, child rearing, and personality; relationships between various aspects of culture and psychological functioning within non-Western cultures and American ethnic subcultures.
P: HUM DEV 102 or ANTHRO 100; REC: soc sci cse.

HUM DEV 343. Adulthood and Aging. 3 Credits.

Theory and empirical research concerning developmental processes across the adult life span; psychological, cultural and biological factors which influence development in young adulthood, middle adulthood and old age.
P: HUM DEV 102 or PSYCH 102; REC: HUM DEV 331 and 332.

HUM DEV 344. Dying, Death, and Loss. 3 Credits.

Death, dying, and loss from a multidisciplinary diversity perspective; the development of death concepts across the life span, end of life issues, and cross-cultural death practices and their relation to the American death system.
P: HUM DEV 102.

HUM DEV 345. Human Sexuality. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the major psychological, biological, and sociocultural models of human sexuality, with an emphasis on sexual identity development throughout childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging.
P: HUM DEV 102; REC: HUM BIOL 102.

HUM DEV 346. Culture, Development and Health. 3 Credits.

The course will focus on different cultural groups in the U.S. providing a brief multicultural history with an overview of the major religious worldviews before examining how development and approaches to health and well-being vary across cultures.
P: HUM DEV 102.

HUM DEV 350. Developmental Psychobiology. 3 Credits.

New brains, young minds, and early behaviors will be explored using animal and human models.
P: HUM DEV 102; and HUM BIOL 102 or Biol 202.

HUM DEV 353. Family Development. 3 Credits.

An overview of the study of the American family from a developmental perspective, with particular emphasis on family members' life cycle changes.
P: HUM DEV 102 or SOCIOL 202.

HUM DEV 370. Personal Relationships. 3 Credits.

This course will examine research and theory on the development and processes of romantic relationships, including: attraction, commitment, sexuality, relationship maintenance and dissolution. Students will read primary sources on cutting-edge research in the field, such as: the role of biochemistry in attraction, the impact of personal relationships on health, and the effectiveness of relationship education programs.
P: Hum Dev 210 REC: HUM DEV 302 or COMM SCI 301 or PSYCH 300.

HUM DEV 424. The Development of Creative and Critical Thinking. 3 Credits.

Explores the definitions and assessment of creative thinking across the lifespan and provides the opportunity to discuss controversial issues in the field and to practice techniques for facilitating thought.
P: Hum Dev 210; and jr st or upper lev Hum Dev/Psych cse.

HUM DEV 443. Spirituality and Development. 3 Credits.

This course in Human Development will explore how spirituality, religion, and faith may represent important aspects of development across the lifespan. Important questions to address include the following: How may 'spirituality' be defined? Is aging a form of spiritual development? Discussion of theoretical, research, and practice applications.
REC: Hum Dev 210, HUM DEV 343.

HUM DEV 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

HUM DEV 495. Teaching Assistantship. 1-6 Credits.

Students will learn the different components related to successful instruction. This will include theoretical perspective, empirical research, and pedagogical techniques relating to teaching that they can apply to a broad array of future teaching and learning experiences.
P: HUM DEV 102, 3.0 GPA in Human Dev and consent of inst; REC: sr st.

HUM DEV 496. Research Assistantship. 1-6 Credits.

Students will assist faculty in conducting research. Responsibilities may include literature reviews, library investigations, questionnaire development, recruitment and interviewing of research participants, data collection, management of research studies, data entry, and some statistical analyses.
P: HUM DEV 102. REC: COMM SCI 301.

HUM DEV 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st and gpa > or = 3.00.

HUM DEV 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

HUM DEV 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HUM DEV 544. Dying, Death, and Loss. 3 Credits.

Death, dying, and loss from a multidisciplinary diversity perspective; the development of death concepts across the life span, end of life issues, and cross-cultural death practices and their relation to the American death system.
P: gr st.

Humanistic Studies Courses

HUM STUD 101. Foundations of Western Culture I. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of Western Civilization. This course covers ancient civilization through the Renaissance.

HUM STUD 102. Foundations of Western Culture II. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of Western Civilization. This covers the Renaissance up to the present.

HUM STUD 103. World Civilizations I. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art, and culture of various world civilizations. This course covers the origins of civilization to the Age of Exploration.

HUM STUD 104. World Civilizations II. 3 Credits.

Chronological survey of major events, people, and ideas that have influenced the history, literature, art and culture of various world civilizations. This course covers the Age of Exploration up to the present.

HUM STUD 160. Introduction to Language. 3 Credits.

Study of language and linguistics, including basic principles and methods in structural linguistics, social and regional variation in language, historical change and introductory study of meaning.

HUM STUD 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

HUM STUD 201. Introduction to the Humanities I. 3 Credits.

Major methods and ideas of the western humanities, examined in selected works of literature, philosophy and fine arts, from Classical world through Renaissance.

HUM STUD 202. Introduction to the Humanities II. 3 Credits.

Major methods and ideas of the western humanities, examined in selected works of literature, philosophy and fine arts, from Baroque through the Modern Period.

HUM STUD 213. Ethnic Diversity and Human Values. 3 Credits.

This course will explore some of the most fundamental questions of human values and meaning by studying the rich literature, history, and culture of one or more of the following groups of the United States: African American, American Indian, Asian American, and Latino.

HUM STUD 220. ESL: Listening and Speaking Across Cultures. 3-6 Credits.

Global and discrete listening and speaking skills for ESL students based on content in intercultural communication. Emphasis on note-taking, listening for main ideas and key details, organizing and delivering speeches, and participating effectively in debates and small and large group discussions.
P: International student status or permission of instructor.

HUM STUD 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HUM STUD 318. Topics in Linguistics/TESL. 3 Credits.

Analysis and discussion of topics of central importance in applied linguistics and Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL). Possible topics include:Teaching Grammer to ELLs; Second Language Pragmatics; Second Language Writing; and others.

HUM STUD 319. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Credits.

Overview of issues in second-language acquisition, including linguistic, cognitive, social, and affective factors. Students will examine and think about learner language, read research on learner language, and consider implications for second-language teaching.
Rec: HUM STUD 160.

HUM STUD 320. Second Language Assessment. 3 Credits.

An exploration of policies, procedures, and instruments in assessing English language proficiency. Focus will be on practical assessment strategies and their incorporation into instructional planning.
P: HUM STUD 160 or EDUC 311 or 315.

HUM STUD 321. Language and Society. 3 Credits.

The study of language in relation to society, including social and regional dialects, bilingualism and language contact, speech communities, the ethnography of language, and applications such as language policy and planning.
P: None. REC: HUM STUD 160.

HUM STUD 323. The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary study of the Hebrew Bible (also called the Old Testament), read and discussed in English.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HUM STUD 324. The New Testament. 3 Credits.

The origins of the Christian tradition as reflected in the primary texts of that tradition in the New Testament: The major divisions of the writings of the New Testament, the life of Jesus as recorded in the gospels, the importance of St. Paul and the apocalyptic writings of St. John.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HUM STUD 326. Non-Western Religions. 3 Credits.

The two major religions of the East, Hinduism and Buddhism: the richness, variety and flexibility of the faith and practice of Hinduism, with its belief in a multiplicity of gods and goddesses; and the various sects and schools of Buddhism--Theravadic, Mayahana, Zen and Tantric.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HUM STUD 327. Religion and the Social Order. 3 Credits.

This course considers sociological, class, and economic analyses of religion. Exploring how these approaches challenge religious belief, it also examines how modern religious thinkers respond to this challenge.
P: jr st; REC: HUM STUD 201 and 202.

HUM STUD 334. Perspectives on Human Values: The Classical World. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the values of the world of classical Greece and Rome as reflected in its texts and fine arts.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 335. Perspectives on Human Values: The Medieval World. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the history, society, culture and values of the middle ages as reflected in its literature and fine arts.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 336. Perspectives on Human Values: The Renaissance. 3 Credits.

Explores human values as they appear in texts and fine arts in the 15th and 16th century European Renaissance.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 337. Perspectives on Human Values: The Age of Reason. 3 Credits.

Immerses in the ideas that fueled the enlightenment era in seventeenth and eighteenth century Europe. Focuses specifically on political turmoil amidst radical thinking, the revolution in the conduct of science, and the impact of these changes on the social world.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 350. Interdisciplinary Study of Great Works. 1-3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary study of one or more works central to the Humanistic tradition. Variable content.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 351. Interdisciplinary Themes in Humanistic Studies. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary examination of a single important theme in the Humanities. Variable content.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 352. Literatures in Translation. 3 Credits.

A study of selected works of literatures in translation. A variable content course.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 356. German Culture. 3 Credits.

The culture of the German-speaking world from the earliest periods to the present with a focus on how contemporary Germany has been shaped by issues of history, religion, art, music, philosophy, and commerce.

HUM STUD 357. German Cinema. 3 Credits.

Historical and critical introduction to the work of prominent German filmmakers and to cinematic representations of German culture.

HUM STUD 360. Globalization and Cultural Conflict. 3 Credits.

This course examines the phenomenon of globalization and its impact on cultural identity as well as the conflicts in values and belief-systems that have arisen in its wake. We will explore the notion of a clash of civilizations and cultures with particular emphasis on the supposed clash between the West and the Islamic world.
REC: jr st.

HUM STUD 382. Perspective on Human Values: Romanticism to Modernism. 3 Credits.

Studies the challenge to tradition and reason and the response to that challenge from the development of romanticism in the late 18th century to the flowering of modernism in the early twentieth century.
P: HUM STUD 102 or 202; REC: jr st.

HUM STUD 383. Perspectives on Human Values: The Contemporary World. 3 Credits.

A study of values shaping the contemporary world through reflection on historical, literary, philosophical, artistic, and other cultural products from the Second World War to the present.
P: HUM STUD 102 or 202; REC: jr st.

HUM STUD 384. Perspectives on Human Values in Other Cultures. 3 Credits.

Study of values and worldview of a culture other than those of Western Europe and the United States.
P: none; REC: jr st.

HUM STUD 385. Perspectives on Human Values: First Nations. 3 Credits.

Drawing upon American Indian oral traditions and Elder epistemology, this course will examine the diverse traditional, cultural, spiritual, and political values and world views of American Indian Nations.
P: FNS 225 or 226.

HUM STUD 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

HUM STUD 480. Humanities Seminar. 3 Credits.

A capstone seminar for humanities majors, examining basic questions and issues in the humanities. Course will emphasize student participation and a substantial term paper. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when different topics are covered.
P: Humanistic Studies major.

HUM STUD 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

HUM STUD 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

HUM STUD 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

HUM STUD 518. Topics in Linguistics/TESL. 3 Credits.

Analysis and discussion of topics of central importance in applied linguistics and Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL). Possible topics include:Teaching Grammer to ELLs; Second Language Pragmatics; Second Language Writing; and others.
P: gr st.

HUM STUD 519. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Credits.

Overview of issues in second-language acquisition, including linguistic, cognitive, social, and affective factors. Students will examine and think about learner language, read research on learner language, and consider implications for second-language teaching.
P: gr st.

HUM STUD 520. Second Language Assessment. 3 Credits.

An exploration of policies, procedures, and instruments in assessing English language proficiency. Focus will be on practical assessment strategies and their incorporation into instructional planning.
P: gr st.

HUM STUD 521. Language and Society. 3 Credits.

The study of language in relation to society, including social and regional dialects, bilingualism and language contact, speech communities, the ethnography of language, and applications such as language policy and planning.
P: gr st.

Information Sciences Courses

INFO SCI 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

INFO SCI 201. Information, Computers and Society. 3 Credits.

A survey of the social, legal and ethical impacts of computers on individuals and society.

INFO SCI 210. Information Problems. 3 Credits.

An introduction to understanding and solving information problems, including: a survey of the field of information science; practice in algorithmic thinking; techniques for finding, assessing, organizing, and presenting information; and confrontation with ethical and value issues.

INFO SCI 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

INFO SCI 308. Information Technologies. 3 Credits.

A survey of information technologies, their operations and limitations, and how the major electronic technologies are changing and affecting both the workplace and the household.
P: at least 15 credits of supporting core courses in Communication or declared program in Information Sciences.

INFO SCI 390. Technical Writing. 3 Credits.

Scientific and technical writing for professional and lay audiences, including news articles and features, laboratory reports, training and procedure manuals, grant and contract proposals and technical reports.
P: ENG COMP 100 or 164 or ACT English score of 25 or higher; and completion of nat sci gen educ req.

INFO SCI 410. Advanced Information Problems. 3 Credits.

Practice in solving information problems and documenting skills for external audiences.
P: INFO SCI 210 and sr st.

INFO SCI 430. Information, Media and Society. 3 Credits.

The role of information in society, including interpersonal, mass, and institutional sources, in producing a range of effects on individuals, groups, and society as a whole; critical examination of the changing information environment in legal, economic, political, and social contexts.
P: at least 15 credits of core supporting courses in Communication or declared student in Information Sciences.

INFO SCI 440. Information and Computing Science Practicum. 3 Credits.

A project course in which teams submit proposals to work in an information problem. Projects provide experience in leadership roles, resource allocation, scheduling, documentation, client relations, and presentation. Problems typically draw on a wider array of skills than in other individual classes.
P: sr st.

INFO SCI 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

INFO SCI 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

INFO SCI 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

INFO SCI 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Mathematics Courses

MATH 94. Elementary Algebra. 3 Credits.

Intended as a preparation for MATH 101. Topics include: properties of real numbers, exponents and polynomials, simplifying variable expressions, linear equations and inequalities, factoring, graphing, and basic quadratic equations. Offered on a pass/no credit, non-degree credit basis only.

MATH 101. Intermediate Algebra. 3 Credits.

Properties of the real numbers; solving linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; polynomials; fractional expressions and equations; exponents, powers and roots; systems of linear equations.
P: Math 094 or Math Placement of MATH 101 or greater.

MATH 104. Elementary Functions: Algebra and Trigonometry. 4 Credits.

The real number system; inequalities; functions and their inverses; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; complex numbers; polynomial and rational functions; systems of equations.
P: MATH 101 with at least a C grade or transfer cse Math 004 or Math Placement of MATH 104 or greater.

MATH 201. Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences. 3 Credits.

Basic concepts and techniques of differential and integral calculus; Applications in the fields of accounting, economics, finance and management.
P: MATH 101 with at least a C grade or transfer cse Math 004 or Math Placement of MATH 104 or greater.

MATH 202. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I. 4 Credits.

Differential and integral calculus of the elementary functions with associated analytic geometry; transcendental functions; techniques of integration; application; sequences and series.
P: MATH 104 with at least a C grade or Math Placement of MATH 202 or greater.

MATH 203. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II. 4 Credits.

Differential and integral calculus of the elementary functions with associated analytic geometry; transcendental functions; techniques of integration; application; sequences and series.
P: MATH 202 with at least a C grade.

MATH 209. Multivariate Calculus. 4 Credits.

Real-valued functions of several variables; tangent and normal lines; chain rule for partial derivatives; extrema; least squares method; higher-ordered derivatives; integration; polar and cylindrical coordinates; spherical coordinates; vector fields; line integrals; physical applications.
P: MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

MATH 260. Introductory Statistics. 4 Credits.

Descriptive and inferential statistics; frequency distributions; graphical techniques; measure of central tendency and of dispersion; probability regression correlation, analysis of count data, analysis of variance. Credit will not be granted for both MATH 260 and (Bus Adm 215, 216, or 217).
P: MATH 101 with at least a C grade or Math Placement of MATH 101/260 or greater. Credit will not be granted for both MATH 260 and (Bus Adm 215, 216, or 217).

MATH 281. Conceptual Foundations of Elementary Mathematics I. 3 Credits.

Foundations of mathematics, particularly those concepts common to the mathematics curriculum of elementary schools. Explores the processes of abstraction, symbolic representation, notational manipulation and modeling in all arithmetic contexts; examines non-arithmetic topics such as geometry, probability, statistics, algebra, and programming concepts.
P: Full admission to EDUC.

MATH 282. Conceptual Foundations of Elementary Mathematics II. 3 Credits.

Foundations of mathematics, particularly those concepts common to the mathematics curriculum of elementary schools. Explores the processes of abstraction, symbolic representation, notational manipulation and modeling in all arithmetic contexts; examines non-arithmetic topics such as geometry, probability, statistics, algebra, and programming concepts. May not be taken on a pass/no credit basis.
P: Full Admission to EDUC.

MATH 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

MATH 305. Ordinary Differential Equations. 3 Credits.

Solutions and applications of first and higher order linear differential equations; the meanings of existence and uniqueness theorems; nonlinear differential equations; modeling physical and biological systems.
P: MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

MATH 314. Proofs in Number Theory and Topology. 3 Credits.

This course deals with the construction of detailed proofs of mathematical theorems within the context of the fertile fields of Number Theory and Topology.
P: MATH 202 with at least a C grade; REC: MATH 203.

MATH 320. Linear Algebra I. 3 Credits.

Matrices and vector space concepts. Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vectors in two-and three-space, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors; positive-definite matrices, normal forms, the principal axis theorem, applications.
P: MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

MATH 321. Linear Algebra II. 3 Credits.

Matrices and vector space concepts. Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vectors in two-and three-space, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors; positive-definite matrices, normal forms, the principal axis theorem, applications.
P: MATH 320 with at least a C grade.

MATH 323. Analysis I. 4 Credits.

A course in the basic ideas of classical real analysis. Sets, functions, real numbers, limits, Euclidean space, topology of Euclidean space, continuity and uniform continuity, uniform convergence, and function spaces and their applications.
P: MATH 209 with at least a C grade and 314 with at least a C grade.

MATH 324. Analysis II. 4 Credits.

Differentiable mappings, the inverse and implicit function theorems and related topics, integration on Euclidean space, Fubini's theorem and the change of variables formula, and Fourier Analysis.
P: MATH 323 with at least a C grade.

MATH 328. Introduction to Algebraic Structures. 3 Credits.

Groups, rings, and fields as organizing ideas. Basic structure theorems. Applications.
P: MATH 314 with at least a C grade and 320 with at least a C grade.

MATH 355. Applied Mathematical Optimization. 3 Credits.

Analytical and numerical optimization techniques; linear, nonlinear, integer, and dynamic programming. Techniques applied to problems of water, forest, air and solid-waste management.
P: MATH 320 with at least a C grade or conc enr.

MATH 360. Theory of Probability. 3 Credits.

Probability as a mathematical system, with applications; basic probability theory; combinatorial analysis; distribution functions and probability laws; mean and variance of a probability law; expectation related probability laws; random variables.
P: MATH 209 with at least a C grade.

MATH 361. Mathematical Statistics. 3 Credits.

Sample moments and their distributions; tests of hypotheses; point and interval estimation; regression and linear hypotheses; nonparametric methods; sequential methods.
P: MATH 320 with at least a C grade and 360 with at least a C grade.

MATH 385. Foundations of Geometry. 3 Credits.

Intuitive and deductive introductions to Euclidean, affine, hyperbolic, spherical, elliptic and projective geometries.
P: MATH 314 with at least a C grade.

MATH 410. Complex Analysis. 3 Credits.

Algebra and geometry of complex numbers; analytic functions, elementary transformations, integration, Taylor and Laurent series, contour integration, residues, conformal mapping.
P: MATH 209 with at least a C grade.

MATH 425. Dynamical Systems. 3 Credits.

Fundamental concepts and techniques of discrete and continuous dynamical systems; asymptotic behavior, structural stability, elementary bifurcations, strange attractors, fractals, chaos. Applications to physical and biological systems.
P: MATH 209 with at least a C grade and 320 with at least a C grade; and 305 with at least a C grade or conc enr.

MATH 430. Design of Experiments. 4 Credits.

Statistical theory and practice underlying the design of scientific experiments, and methods of analysis. Replication, randomization, error, linear models, least squares, crossed and nested models, blocking, factorial experiments, Latin squares, confounding, incomplete blocks, split-plots.
P: MATH 202 with at least a C grade; and MATH 260 with at least a C grade or BUS ADM 215 with at least a C grade.

MATH 431. Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 4 Credits.

Principles and practice in the analysis of multivariate data. Correlation, partial correlation, principle components, factor analysis discriminate functions, canonical correlation, cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling. Emphasis on computer analysis of actual data.
P: MATH 202 with at least a C grade and 320 with at least a C grade; and MATH 260 with at least a C grade or BUS ADM 215 with at least a C grade.

MATH 467. Applied Regression Analysis. 4 Credits.

Techniques for fitting linear regression models are developed and applied to data. Topics include simple linear regression, multivariate regression, curvilinear regression and linearizable models.
P: MATH 260 with at least a C grade or BUS ADM 215 with at least a C grade; and MATH 202 with at least a C grade and 320 with at least a C grade; REC: knowledge of Excel.

MATH 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

MATH 492. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-4 Credits.

This course brings together students and professors who have a mutual interest in some topic not otherwise available among the usual mathematics and statistics offerings.

MATH 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

MATH 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

MATH 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

MATH 555. Applied Mathematical Optimization. 3 Credits.

Analytical and numerical optimization techniques; linear, nonlinear, integer, and dynamic programming. Techniques applied to problems of water, forest, air and solid-waste management.
P: gr st.

MATH 630. Design of Experiments. 4 Credits.

Statistical theory and practice underlying the design of scientific experiments, and methods of analysis. Replication, randomization, error, linear models, least squares, crossed and nested models, blocking, factorial experiments, Latin squares, confounding, incomplete blocks, split-plots.
P: gr st and intro stats cse.

MATH 631. Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 4 Credits.

Principles and practice in the analysis of multivariate data. Correlation, partial correlation, principle components, factor analysis discriminate functions, canonical correlation, cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling. Emphasis on computer analysis of actual data.
P: gt st and intro stats cse.

MATH 667. Applied Regression Analysis. 4 Credits.

Techniques for fitting linear regression models are developed and applied to data. Topics include simple linear regression, multivariate regression, curvilinear regression and linearizable models.
P: gr st.

MATH 698. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

P: gr st.

Music Applied Courses

MUS APP 11. Keyboard Musicianship I. 1 Credit.

Instruction in basic keyboard skills to include scales, chords, simple accompaniments, and beginning to intermediate solo literature.
P: MUSIC 151 or conc enr.

MUS APP 13. Keyboard Musicianship I. 1 Credit.

Instruction in basic keyboard skills to include scales, chords, etudes, and performance, transposition and improvisation of accompaniments.
P: MUSIC 151 or conc enr.

MUS APP 21. Keyboard Musicianship II. 1 Credit.

Instruction in basic keyboard skills to include scales, chords, simple accompaniments, and beginning to intermediate solo literature.
P: Mus App 011 and MUSIC 151 or concurrent enrollment.

MUS APP 31. Keyboard Musicianship III. 1 Credit.

Instruction in basic keyboard skills to include scales, chords, simple accompaniments, and beginning to intermediate solo literature.
P: Mus App 021; and MUSIC 151 or conc enr.

MUS APP 41. Keyboard Musicianship IV. 1 Credit.

Instruction in basic keyboard skills to include scales, chords, etudes, and performance, transposition and improvisation of accompaniments.
P: Mus App 031 and MUSIC 151 or concurrent enrollment.

MUS APP 45. Elementary Voice I. 1 Credit.

Beginning level instruction in vocal health, and the physiology and techniques of singing. Use of the singing voice in teaching music is a course component.
P: MUSIC 151 or conc enr.

MUS APP 69. Elementary Guitar. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to build a technical and musical vocabulary for effective use of the guitar as an accompanying instrument in the music classroom.
P: Educ 253 and must provide guitar.

MUS APP 101. First Year Piano I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262.

MUS APP 102. First Year Piano II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262.

MUS APP 103. First Year Organ I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262.

MUS APP 104. First Year Organ II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262.

MUS APP 105. First Year Voice I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of their voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262.

MUS APP 106. First Year Voice II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of their voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 261 or 262; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 107. First Year Flute I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 108. First Year Flute II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 109. First Year Oboe I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 110. First Year Oboe II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 111. First Year Clarinet I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 112. First Year Clarinet II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 113. First Year Saxophone I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 114. First Year Saxophone II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 115. First Year Bassoon I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 116. First Year Bassoon II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 117. First Year Horn I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 118. First Year Horn II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 119. First Year Trumpet-Cornet I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 120. First Year Trumpet-Cornet II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 121. First Year Trombone I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 122. First Year Trombone II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 123. First Year Baritone I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the baritone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 124. First Year Baritone II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the baritone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 125. First Year Tuba I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 126. First Year Tuba II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 127. First Year Percussion I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 128. First Year Percussion II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 129. First Year Guitar I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262.

MUS APP 130. First Year Guitar II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262.

MUS APP 137. First Year String Bass I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241.

MUS APP 138. First Year String Bass II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc enr in Mus App 241; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 181. Phoenix Band. 1-2 Credits.

The UW-Green Bay Phoenix Band performs at UWGB basketball home games. Membership is open to anyone who plays a band instrument. The ensemble rehearses during the first weeks of the semester and then performs at games once the season begins. (The course will begin in September and end in April to parallel the basketball season.)
Audition required.

MUS APP 190. First Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262.

MUS APP 201. Second Year Piano I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 202. Second Year Piano II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 203. Second Year Organ I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 204. Second Year Organ II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 205. Second Year Voice I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 206. Second Year Voice II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 207. Second Year Flute I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 208. Second Year Flute II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 209. Second Year Oboe I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 210. Second Year Oboe II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 211. Second Year Clarinet I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 212. Second Year Clarinet II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 213. Second Year Saxophone I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 214. Second Year Saxophone II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 215. Second Year Bassoon I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441.

MUS APP 216. Second Year Bassoon II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 217. Second Year Horn I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 218. Second Year Horn II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 219. Second Year Trumpet-Cornet I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 220. Second Year Trumpet-Cornet II. 1-2 Credits.

students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 221. Second Year Trombone I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 222. Second Year Trombone II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 223. Second Year Baritone I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of their instrument or voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441.

MUS APP 224. Second Year Baritone II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the baritone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 225. Second Year Tuba I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 226. Second Year Tuba II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 227. Second Year Percussion I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 228. Second Year Percussion II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 229. Second Year Guitar I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 230. Second Year Guitar II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P; Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 237. Second Year String Bass I. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 238. Second Year String Bass II. 1-2 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS ENS 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 289. Second Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice I. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will also be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 290. Second Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice II. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will also be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

MUS APP 301. Third Year Piano I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 302. Third Year Piano II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 303. Third Year Organ I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 304. Third Year Organ II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 305. Third Year Voice I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 306. Third Year Voice II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 307. Third Year Flute I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 308. Third Year Flute II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 309. Third Year Oboe I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 310. Third Year Oboe II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 311. Third Year Clarinet I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 312. Third Year Clarinet II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 313. Third Year Saxophone I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 314. Third Year Saxophone II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 315. Third Year Bassoon I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 316. Third Year Bassoon II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 317. Third Year Horn I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 318. Third Year Horn II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 319. Third Year Trumpet-Cornet I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 320. Third Year Trumpet-Cornet II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 321. Third Year Trombone I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 322. Third Year Trombone II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 323. Third Year Baritone I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the baritone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 324. Third Year Baritone II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the baritone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 325. Third Year Tuba I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 326. Third Year Tuba II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 327. Third Year Percussion I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 328. Third Year Percussion II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 329. Third Year Guitar I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 330. Third Year Guitar II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 337. Third Year String Bass I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS ENS 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 338. Third Year String Bass II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 241 or 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 381. Phoenix Band. 1-2 Credits.

The UW-Green Bay Phoenix Band performs at UWGB basketball home games. Membership is open to anyone who plays a band instrument. The ensemble rehearses during the first weeks of the semester and then performs at games once the season begins. (The course will begin in September and end in April to parallel the basketball season.)
Audition required.

MUS APP 389. Third Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice I. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 390. Third Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice II. 1 Credit.

Study of literature from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 396. Junior Recital. 0 Credits.

Required of students pursuing the B.M. degree. An elective course for any other student who qualifies.
P: Music major and concurrent enrollment in MUS APP 302, 304, 306, 308, 310, 312, 314, 316, 318, 320, 322, 324, 326, 328, 330, or 338.

MUS APP 401. Fourth Year Piano I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 402. Fourth Year Piano II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the piano through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 403. Fourth Year Organ I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 404. Fourth Year Organ II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the organ through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 405. Fourth Year Voice I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 406. Fourth Year Voice II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of voice through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 407. Fourth Year Flute I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 408. Fourth Year Flute II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the flute through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 409. Fourth Year Oboe I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 410. Fourth Year Oboe II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the oboe through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 411. Fourth Year Clarinet I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 412. Fourth Year Clarinet II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the clarinet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 413. Fourth Year Saxophone I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 414. Fourth Year Saxophone II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the saxophone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 415. Fourth Year Bassoon I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 416. Fourth Year Bassoon II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the bassoon through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 417. Fourth Year Horn I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 418. Fourth Year Horn II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the horn through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 419. Fourth Year Trumpet-Cornet I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 420. Fourth Year Trumpet-Cornet II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trumpet-cornet through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 421. Fourth Year Trombone I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 422. Fourth Year Trombone II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the trombone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 423. Fourth Year Baritone I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the baritone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 424. Fourth Year Baritone II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the baritone through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 425. Fourth Year Tuba I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 426. Fourth Year Tuba II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the tuba through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 427. Fourth Year Percussion I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 428. Fourth Year Percussion II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of percussion through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 429. Fourth Year Guitar I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply. P: Repeatable to 3 cr. conc enr in MUSIC 151 or 152 or 251 or 252 or 351 or 352. /(F,S) FA
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 430. Fourth Year Guitar II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the guitar through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply. P: Repeatable to 3 cr. conc enr in MUSIC 151 or 152 or 251 or 252 or 351 or 352. /(F,S) FA
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 241 or 261 or 262 or 441 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 437. Fourth Year String Bass I. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 438. Fourth Year String Bass II. 1-3 Credits.

Students study the solo literature of the string bass through private instruction. The development of proper technique and a mature tone are significant components. Placement is by audition. Special enrollment restrictions apply.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc enr in MUS APP 441; Minimum grade of C in corresponding previous level of applied lessons.

MUS APP 489. Fourth Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice I. 1 Credit.

Study of songs drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement by audition.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 490. Fourth Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice II. 1 Credit.

Study of literature from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement by audition.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

MUS APP 496. Senior Recital. 0 Credits.

Required of students pursuing the B.M. degree. An elective course for any other student who qualifies.
P: Music major and concurrent enrollment in MUS APP 402, 404, 406, 408, 410, 412, 414, 416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426, 428, 430, or 438.

MUS APP 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

MUS APP 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

Music Courses

MUSIC 102. Concert Attendance. 0 Credits.

Students develop listening skills and an appreciation for and awareness of the breadth of musical genres and repertory through attendance at music concerts. Attendance encourages the development of audience skills, aesthetic appreciation, and a sense of membership in a learning community of musicians.

MUSIC 103. Music Technology Tools. 1 Credit.

An introduction to music software and technology commonly used by musicians.
P: conc enr MUSIC 151.

MUSIC 115. Ear Training and Sight Singing I. 1 Credit.

Concentrated drill in all aspects of musicianship. Emphasis on sight singing and aural perception in intervals, melodies, chords and rhythms.
P: conc enr in MUSIC 151.

MUSIC 116. Ear Training and Sight Singing II. 1 Credit.

Concentrated drill in all aspects of musicianship. Emphasis on sight singing and aural perception in intervals, melodies, chords and rhythms.
P: MUSIC 115;and 152 or Music 153 or concurrent enrollment.

MUSIC 121. Survey of Western Music. 3 Credits.

The musical styles of several well-known composers as evident in selected compositions; review of a basic repertoire of musical compositions of various forms and styles.

MUSIC 151. Music Theory I. 3 Credits.

The materials of which Western music is made are viewed not only in structural terms, but also in psychological, aesthetic and social perspective.
P: conc enr in MUSIC 115; and conc enr in Mus App 011 or 021 or 031 or 013.

MUSIC 152. Music Theory II. 3 Credits.

The materials of which Western music is made are viewed not only in structural terms, but also in psychological, aesthetic and social perspective.
P: MUSIC 151.

MUSIC 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

MUSIC 209. Applied Composition. 1 Credit.

An individualized approach to the study of music composition, with an emphasis on small-scale forms and small ensemble works.
P: MUSIC 152 or 153.

MUSIC 215. Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training. 1 Credit.

Concentrated musicianship training with emphasis on chromatic melodies, advanced rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic dictation.
P: Successful completion of MUSIC 116 with a grade of C or better and concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 253.

MUSIC 220. Introduction to Jazz Theory and Improvisation. 2 Credits.

An introduction to jazz theory and improvisation through lecture and classroom performance on instrument and voice. Emphasis will be placed on scales, modes and harmonic progressions which are common to the jazz repertoire.
P: MUSIC 151 or conc enrl. Rec: ability to read music.

MUSIC 224. Popular Music Since 1955. 3 Credits.

Evolution of popular music since 1955 and its relationship to society, especially rock music in the 1960's and early 1970's, the period of greatest stylistic expansion and also the period in which the music was most intimately intertwined with its social milieu.

MUSIC 242. Jazz and Pop Literature. 2 Credits.

Open to singers or instrumentalists. Students memorize and perform standard pop and jazz literature.
P: MUSIC 151.

MUSIC 253. Music Theory III. 3 Credits.

Study of tonal and structural organization in music: non-chord tones, seventh chords, secondary harmonic relationships, methods of modulation, simple forms, counterpoint, and chromatic tonality.
P: Successful completion of MUSIC 116 and MUSCI 152 or 153 with a grade of C or better, and completion of Mus Ap 102, 104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130, or 138. REc: Concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 353.

MUSIC 254. Music Theory IV. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of chromatic tonality in music: methods of modulation, reductionism, advanced chromatic functions, enharmonicism, and materials of impressionism and 20th century technique.
P: Successful completion of MUSIC 215 and 253. REC: conc enrl MUSIC 354.

MUSIC 272. Women in the Performing Arts. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course examines the contributions of women in the performing arts and looks closely at the factors which constrain and further women's creativity in a variety of performing genres: dance, theater, opera, musical theater, conducting, composition, etc.

MUSIC 283L. Integrated Materials in Music. 2 Credits.

A study of the basic materials of music theory with an integrated approach to the visual or aural recognition of those materials.

MUSIC 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

MUSIC 301. Music Technology Systems. 2 Credits.

This course will provide information and experience with the terminology, resources and techniques needed to successfully record, edit, and produce music using a digital audio workstation. In addition, topics such as live sound, analog synthesis, MIDI, and notation software will be explained and used to enhance student-created music.
P: MUSIC 103 and completion or conc enr in MUSIC 152.

MUSIC 305. Diction for Singers I. 2 Credits.

Introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet and a specialized approach to diction study for American English and French.

MUSIC 306. Diction for Singers II. 2 Credits.

Specialized approach to diction study of Italian and German using the International Phonetic Alphabet.
P: MUSIC 305.

MUSIC 311. Jazz Improvisation. 2 Credits.

Development of skills in musical improvisation: notation and function of chords, chord symbols, scales and rhythms; selected record listening and playing sessions.
P: MUSIC 253.

MUSIC 319. Choral/Vocal Techniques. 1-3 Credits.

This course will provide instruction in: 1) a basic method of teaching vocal production at all levels of public school instruction; 2) basic skills in arranging, adapting, and creating scores for small and large choral ensembles; and 3) basic techniques for choosing high quality choral literature from the Renaissance to the present, suitable for performance at all levels of public school instruction.
P: MUSIC 253 and Mus App 011; and MUSIC 306 or conc enr.

MUSIC 333. Basic Conducting. 2 Credits.

Detailed study of conducting techniques: practical application to choral and instrumental ensembles.
P: MUSIC 152 or 153 and one of the following; MUS APP 102, 104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130 or 138.

MUSIC 341. Woodwind Techniques. 2 Credits.

Experience in the performance, pedagogy and critical evaluation of woodwind instruments, including flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, and saxophone. Experience arranging and adapting music for woodwind players in school ensembles.
P: MUSIC 152 or 153 and one of the following; MUS APP 102, 104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130 or 138.

MUSIC 342. Brass Techniques. 2 Credits.

Experience in the performance, pedagogy and critical evaluation of brass instruments, including trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone, and tuba. Experience arranging and adapting music for brass instruments in student ensembles.
P: MUSIC 152 or 153 and one of the following; MUS APP 102, 104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130 or 138.

MUSIC 343. String Techniques. 2 Credits.

Experience in the performance, pedagogy and critical evaluation of string instruments, including violin, viola, violoncello and string bass. Experience arranging and adapting music for string players inn school ensembles.
P: MUSIC 152 or 153 and one of the following; MUS APP 102, 104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130 or 138.

MUSIC 344. Choral Conducting and Rehearsal Techniques. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of conducting and rehearsal techniques for school vocal ensembles, including principles, techniques and methods of choral tone, diction and score study.
P: MUSIC 333; REC: jr st.

MUSIC 345. Percussion Techniques. 2 Credits.

Experience in the performance, pedagogy and critical evaluation of percussion instruments, including snare drum, timpani, keyboards, and accessories. Experience arranging for percussionists in school ensembles.
P: MUSIC 152 or 153 and one of the following; MUS APP 102, 104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130 or 138.

MUSIC 348. Instrumental Conducting and Rehearsal Techniques. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of conducting and rehearsing school instrumental ensembles, including score preparation, analysis and musical error detection with specific assignments for marching band and jazz ensemble directing.
P: MUSIC 333; REC: MUSIC 341 or 342 or 343 or 345.

MUSIC 353. Music History I. 3 Credits.

Historical examination of Western music from antiquity to the 18th century.
P: MUSIC 152.

MUSIC 354. Music History II. 3 Credits.

Historical examination of Western music from 19th century to the present..
P: MUSIC 152 and 353.

MUSIC 362. World Music. 3 Credits.

Survey of tribal, folk and non-western art music with an emphasis on cultural, social, religious, political and economic context.

MUSIC 363. Jazz History. 3 Credits.

Cultural conflict, influence and enrichment that arise when differing traditions of the arts come into contact with Jazz History.

MUSIC 364. Musical Theatre History. 3 Credits.

Cultural conflict, influence and enrichment that arise when differing traditions of the arts come into contact with musical theatre and its development.

MUSIC 411. Applied Composition. 1-3 Credits.

An individualized approach to the study of music composition, with an emphasis on large-scale forms and medium to large ensemble works.
P: MUSIC 209, MUSIC 254 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 354.

MUSIC 417. Jazz Arranging. 2 Credits.

Provides students with the knowledge necessary to write jazz arrangements for small and large ensembles.
P: MUSIC 253.

MUSIC 423. Seminar in Music Literature. 3 Credits.

Studies in selected areas of music literature for specific media, such as chamber music, opera, music for keyboard, etc., or on works of a single composer.
P: MUSIC 254 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 354.

MUSIC 453. Materials and Design. 3 Credits.

Investigation of various compositional techniques and formal processes through score study. Concepts explored through composition exercises and original creative works.
P: Successful completion of MUSIC 254 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 354.

MUSIC 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

MUSIC 480. Capstone Project. 3 Credits.

Students complete a faculty approved project with one or more faculty members, at least one of which is from Music, culminating in a performance, composition, production, research project, community based activity, internship, travel course, or other approved project.
P: MUSIC 354.

MUSIC 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

MUSIC 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

MUSIC 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Nursing Degree Completion Courses

NURSING 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

NURSING 317. Health Assessment. 4 Credits.

Techniques of health history and physical examination to ascertain normal from variation of normal health conditions, in addition cultural and developmental variations are considered.
P: major in Nursing and RN license.

NURSING 407. Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

Philosophical perspectices, theories, and standards are applied to the practice of professional nursing. Factors influencing nursing/health care delivery are analyzed. Professional communication skills are enhanced.
P: Nursing Major and RN License.

NURSING 441. Chronic Care Management. 3 Credits.

Exploration of interaction of biological, psychological, social, and environmental factors important to understanding management of chronic conditions at the individual, family, community, and societal levels.
P: Nursing major and RN license.

NURSING 446. Research and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the importance of research to improve clinical practice, strategies to evaluate the quality of research and evidence, and increase integration of research into practice.
P: Nursing Major and RN license; MATH 260, COMM SCI 205 or BUS ADM 216 or conc enrl.

NURSING 447. Leadership and Management. 3 Credits.

Examines nursing leadership and management using relevant theories and concepts. Analyze decision making in relation to delegation, supervision, and group process.
P: Nursing Major and RN License.

NURSING 453. Information Management and Healthcare Technology. 3 Credits.

Utilize computer and information/decision science to support quality and safety in health care. Explore informatics issues and examine nursing's role in healthcare technology. Opportunities to use and master various healthcare technologies and healthcare data will be given.
P: Nursing major and RN license.

NURSING 454. Community Health Nursing. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of community nursing theory, roles, tools and skills needed to promote the health of individuals, families, and populations in communities.
P: Nursing Major and RN License.

NURSING 455. Community Health Nursing Practicum. 3 Credits.

Community Health Nursing Practicum complements the theory, models, and concepts learned in Community Health Nursing. It is a practice component that brings community health nursing into reality. The focus is on disease prevention and health promotion for individuals, families, aggregates, and communities.
P: Major in Nursing: NURSING 454 or concurrent enrollment.

NURSING 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

NURSING 487. Evidence-Based Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the evaluation and utilization of research and other sources of knowledge necessary to address patient needs and provide quality care. Course content covers methods, appraisal, and utilization of research findings with the goal of implementing best practices. Barriers to the use of evidence-based practice and facilitating innovations within the workplace are addressed.
P: MATH 260, COMM SCI 205 or BUS ADM 215 or conc enrl.

NURSING 490. Synthesis for Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

Course focus is synthesis of professional nursing roles introduced in previous courses. In addition, nursing theories are analyzed in light of their value to practice. Nursing's societal involvement is emphasized.
P: Major in Nursing; NURSING 407, 441, 446, 447, 453, 454, 455, and 492 or conc enrl.

NURSING 492. Special Topics in Nursing. 2-4 Credits.

Course topics vary. Typical topics include Nursing Care of Older Adults, Pharmacology, Pathophysiology, Women's Health Care, Informatics, School Health.
P: major in Nursing.

NURSING 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

NURSING 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

NURSING 734. Evaluation and Evidence-Based Practice in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on skills needed for nurses to evaluate outcomes in health systems. Topics include using statistics and information systems in evaluation and research, continuous quality improvement, evidence-based practice, safety and quality indicators, performance improvement methods, and team-based problem solving.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 737. Leadership in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course will forcus on the development of leadership for nurses in complex organizations. Students will explore the cncepts of organizational culture in micro, meso and macro systems. Topics will include transformation of complex organizations, conflict, crisis management, leading innovation, creating a culture of safety, and serving as a mentor and coach.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 741. Theories of Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course will address concepts and theories important to nursing leadership and management in health systems. Organizational behavior, leadership theories, and complexity science will be emphasized.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 745. Economics and Policy in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the health care delivery system in the United States including economic, political, financial, ethical, and social factors affecting health policy. Emphasis will be given to the financing of health care. Statistics will be used to analyze resource management and utilization. Legislative and regulatory processes affecting nursing and healthcare will be addressed.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 750. Human Resource Management in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of human resource management from the perspective of a nurse manager and address effective human resource management practices and policies designed to create and maintain a healthy professional work environment. Communication strategies and technologies, and collaboration on interprofessional healthcare teams and with diverse groups will be addressed. Staffing models, hiring, retention and supervision practices, performance enhancement planning, strategic scheduling, and labor relations/law will be covered.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 755. Program Planning for Population Health. 2 Credits.

This course will focus on the role of the nurse leader in program planning for health promotion and disease prevention for populations. Topics will include determinants of health, epidemiology, biostatistics, and advancing equity in access, services, and outcomes for vulnerable populations.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 760. Informatics in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course will enhance students' knowledge and skills related to nursing informatics in a variety of healthcare settings. Students will learn how to use project management principles and technologies to enhance patient-care delivery, management, and clinical decision support. Research from nursing and other disciplines regarding improving patient outcomes, cost effectiveness and patient safety will be emphasized.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 770. Practicum I Evidence-based Clinical Care in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

Using an inter-professional perspective, specific evidence-based patient quality and safety practice related policy decisions will be explored. Trends, statistics and quality benchmarks will be used to understand decisions in clinical care. The course will provide a structured opportunity for using evidence-based health promotion and disease management principles in family/lifespan nursing care.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 772. Practicum II Leadership and Management in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course will provide a structured experience for exploration of nursing leadership and management roles in health care systems and development of an evidence-based capstone project. Emphasis will be placed on information systems, financial reimbursement models, disaster/crisis management plans and organizational culture.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 774. Practicum III Advanced Leadership and Management in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

In this course a student will assume a nursing leadership role by implementing a capstone project at the practicum site. Reflective strategies will be used to enhance learning and process the practicum experience. The student will disseminate the project findings to an inter-professional team.
P: NURSING 770 & 772.

NURSING 780. Financial Management in Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course will develop knowledge and skills used by nurse leaders for effective financial management in health care systems. Topics will include reimbursement systems, coding and payment mechanisms, ethics and legalities of contracting, governmental regulations, budget development, marketing and inter-professional collaboration around budget and finance.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

NURSING 785. Environmental Sustainability in Health Systems. 2 Credits.

This course will explore sustainability in health systems with emphasis on the environmental impact of health system practices. Implications of United States and global environmental health policy will be analyzed. Economic sustainability including cost-benefit analysis will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on decisions and strategies nurse leaders make that impact sustainability of health systems and the environment.
P: Must be admitted to MSN program.

Nutritional Sciences Courses

NUT SCI 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

NUT SCI 201. Survey of Nutrition Related Professions. 1 Credit.

An overview of the educational, credentialing and practice opportunities for dietetic and related professions. Explore career options for graduates, examine current trends that impact on future jobs, conduct a self-assessment and develop personal career goals.

NUT SCI 212. Science of Food Preparation. 4 Credits.

Studies the chemical, physical and microbiological characteristics of food and the manipulation of these factors to meet quality standards. Laboratory activities demonstrate principles of food science as applied to food preparation, sanitation and safety.
P: CHEM 108 with at least a C grade or CHEM 211 with at least a C grade.

NUT SCI 242. Food and Nutritional Health. 3 Credits.

A basic course in nutrition with an emphasis on the application of nutrition concepts to personal everyday life. Covers the role of nutrients (calories, carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins and minerals) in promoting health. Evaluates a healthy diet and lifestyle.

NUT SCI 250. World Food and Population Issues. 3 Credits.

World hunger and population growth as interrelated problems. Dimensions of the world food situation and its implications; scope, complex causes and effects of malnutrition; general strategies and obstacles to the solution of world food and population problems.

NUT SCI 260. Childhood Obesity: Challenges and Solutions. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the current national and global research related to childhood obesity, with a focus on the physiological, environmental, and behavioral factors that may predispose children and adolescents to obesity. Strategies for effective treatment and prevention will also be examined.

NUT SCI 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

NUT SCI 300. Human Nutrition. 3 Credits.

Examines the physiologic and metabolic roles of nutrients and their food sources. Analysis of the nutrient content of diets and requirements for maintenance of health and prevention of chronic diseases.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; and CHEM 108 with at least a C grade or 212 with at least a C grade.

NUT SCI 302. Ethnic Influences on Nutrition. 3 Credits.

This course examines the ways in which ethnicity influences food habits and can affect nutrition and health status.

NUT SCI 312. Quantity Food Production and Service. 4 Credits.

Principles of quantity food preparation, service, and budgeting in food service systems. Projects and laboratories afford pertinent practical experiences.
P: NUT SCI 212 with at least a C grade.

NUT SCI 327. Nutritional Biochemistry. 4 Credits.

A lecture/laboratory course of applied organic chemistry and biochemistry with an emphasis on human nutrition and disease. Examines structure/function relationships and reactions of molecules, metabolic regulation and the roles of nutrients in normal and abnormal metabolism.
P: BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade; and both CHEM 300 and 301 with at least a C grade or both CHEM 303 and 305 with at least a C grade.

NUT SCI 350. Life Cycle Nutrition. 3 Credits.

Covers nutrient needs and physiologic changes relevant to stages of the life cycle. Also examines psychosocial and environmental conditions that impact on nutrition status in each stage.
P: NUT SCI 300 with at least a C grade.

NUT SCI 402. Management in Dietetic Practice. 3 Credits.

Examines management roles and functions in dietetic practice with an emphasis on a system's approach to management. Focuses on leadership skills and tools needed for operational change and quality improvement.
P: NUT SCI 312 or conc enroll.

NUT SCI 421. Community Nutrition. 4 Credits.

Application of nutrition concepts to the public health/community nutrition setting; overview of community nutrition programs and related legislation.
P: jr st and NUT SCI 300 with at least a C grade.

NUT SCI 427. Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism. 3 Credits.

Examination of non-energy yielding biochemical pathways and associated pathophysiologies. Emphasis is placed on the role of trace-minerals, vitamins and phytochemicals in these pathways.
P: NUT SCI 300 with at least a C grade; REC: NUT SCI 327.

NUT SCI 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

NUT SCI 485. Medical Nutrition Therapy I. 3 Credits.

Theory, principles and application of communication and counseling as applied to behavior changes; principles and application of nutrition assessment and the nutrition care plan process.
P: PSYCH 102 or Hum Dev 210 with at least a C grade; and NUT SCI 300 with at least a C grade.

NUT SCI 486. Medical Nutrition Therapy II. 3 Credits.

Principles and applications of nutrition therapy in the management of common and complex diseases; information about health care systems including managed care and reimbursement issues.
P: NUT SCI 485 with a least a C grade.

NUT SCI 487. Nutritional Science Seminar. 1 Credit.

This course reviews issues affecting food and nutrition professionals and helps prepare students for career goals. Students will use skills in critical thinking, oral and written communication and self-assessment to prepare a resume and apply to a dietetic internship, graduate school or employment.
P: sr st and enr in Nut Sci/Dietetics emphasis.

NUT SCI 495. Research in Nutritional Science. 1-5 Credits.

Work closely with a faculty member to plan, perform, evaluate and report on laboratory research in nutritional science or a related field.
P: HUM BIOL 207 or ENV SCI 207 and approval by faculty mentor.

NUT SCI 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

NUT SCI 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

NUT SCI 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Philosophy Courses

PHILOS 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Credits.

Basic ideas and problems of philosophy: various disciplines and schools of philosophy; important philosophical issues and their relevance to the present.

PHILOS 102. Contemporary Ethical Issues. 3 Credits.

Ethical problems which are significant to an individual in the contemporary world, including traditional issues and current issues in such areas as law, medicine, public policy, business and education.

PHILOS 103. Logic and Reasoning. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the students to the basic concepts and skills of logical reasoning which is central to critical thinking. With the objective of constructing good arguments for successful persuasion and defending ourselves against the illogical and fallacious appeals that bombard us daily, this course examines formal and informal fallacies, rules of syllogisms, and propositional logic and applies these logical tools to samples of real-life situations.

PHILOS 105. Justice and Citizenship in the Modern World. 3 Credits.

This course is a critical examination of some of the most fundamental issues facing citizens in the modern world. Topics covered may include the nature of justice, the distribution of wealth and power, the legitimacy of state authority, the nature of extent of political liberty, the obligations of the citizen to the state, and the proper balance of private rights and public goods in the community.

PHILOS 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

PHILOS 208. Biomedical Ethics. 3 Credits.

Implication of the social and natural science for human values; study of the history of the distinction between fact and value in segments of human life such as politics, law and medical technology.

PHILOS 211. Philosophy of Art. 3 Credits.

The nature and meaning of the various fine arts such as painting, literature, music and film, and their significance for human existence; the nature of the work of art and the creative activity of the artist.

PHILOS 212. Philosophy, Religion, and Science. 3 Credits.

This course considers the relationship between science and religious beliefs, explores the value of knowledge, and asks if science needs a moral vision. After considering these theoretical questions, it then examines issues like religion and evolution, religion and natural laws, the mind-body relationship, genetic engineering, cloning, and euthanasia.

PHILOS 213. Ancient Philosophy. 3 Credits.

The origins and early development of Western philosophy in the context of Classical Greek culture. Introduction to the thought of Plato, Aristotle, and selected pre-modern thinkers; clarification of enduring issues in the Western philosophical tradition.
P: none; REC: PHILOS 101 or 102.

PHILOS 214. Early Modern Philosophy. 3 Credits.

Major thinkers and movements representative of philosophical thought from the 17th century to the present.
P: none; REC: PHILOS 213.

PHILOS 216. Introduction to Asian Philosophy. 3 Credits.

Introduction to representative thinkers and major issues of Asian philosophy, including Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism.

PHILOS 217. Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. 3 Credits.

Introduction to representative thinkers and major issues of the philosophy of religion.

PHILOS 220. Environmental Ethics. 3 Credits.

The goal of this course is to acquaint ourselves with some of the major issues in environmental ethics. Specifically we'll be looking in to the health of our environment the value of individuals, animal consumption and testing, wilderness preservation, food issues, global population and geo-engineered solutions. The course will be inter-disciplinary.

PHILOS 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

PHILOS 301. Ethical Theory. 3 Credits.

A variety of important ethical theories are studied comparatively, and critically evaluated in application to a contemporary moral concern.
P: none; REC: jr st and one philos cse.

PHILOS 308. Philosophy and the Sciences. 3 Credits.

An in-depth introduction to the intersection between the practice of sicence and the practice of philosophy. We will pursue topics that underlie the content, practice and implications of sciences such as Physics, Chemistry, or Biology.
P: none; REC: PHILOS 213 and 214.

PHILOS 309. Religion and Medieval Philosophy. 3 Credits.

An examination of philosophical questions and issues central to religion, coupled with a study of the approaches and answers developed in Medieval Philosophy.
P: none; REC: PHILOS 213 and 214.

PHILOS 323. Modern Philosophy. 3 Credits.

Course topics vary. In one iteration, this course will work its way through seminal thinkers in nineteenth century philosophy including (though not limited to) Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. Our aim will be to both connect these thinkers to earlier ideas and trends in Philosophy and to see how they extend such ideas in radically different ways. In another iteration, this course will delve into a somewhat later historical movement in Philosophy - the existentialists. We will begin with the early influence of Russian authors before moving through later thinkers such as Heidegger, Camus and Sartre. The course will include literary and philosophical readings.
P: none; REC: PHILOS 213 and 214.

PHILOS 324. Contemporary Philosophy. 3 Credits.

Current philosophical movements in Europe and America, such as phenomenology, existentialism, analytic philosophy, intuitionism, pragmatism and Marxism.

PHILOS 326. Philosophy, Politics and Law. 3 Credits.

The nature of politics and law and their interrelations; general legal theory, legal rights, judicial reasoning; the problems of justice, property and morality law.
P: none; REC: philos cse.

PHILOS 351. Happiness and the Good Life. 3 Credits.

This course examines the concept of a happy life through a study of the Asian philosophies of Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism. We will be reading primary texts and secondary philosophical texts, and we will watch and examine influential movies and videos on the topic.
P: None REC: PHILOS 102.

PHILOS 401. Plato and Aristotle. 3 Credits.

This course is critical investigation of the first two comprehensive, philosophical systems of Western civilization. Plato and Aristotle each proposed and argued for a full metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of art. In this course students will be engaged in an in-depth study of their major works.
REC: PHILOS 213.

PHILOS 403. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Credits.

Course topics vary. This will be an in-depth study of a current topic or a figure in philosophy and/or an area of research for one of our faculty members. The aim will be to include students in live and contemporary philosophical literature and debates.
P: upper level cse in Philos.

PHILOS 420. Metaphysics. 3 Credits.

Metaphysics is the study of Being. It comprises some of the oldest and most difficult philosophical questions. In this class we'll investigate some of its major historica and contemporary themes. Topics might include universals, particulars, casuality, personal identity, free will, modality, Gd's existence, space & time, truth, and the challenge of anti-realism.
REC: PHILOS 101, 213, or 214.

PHILOS 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

PHILOS 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

PHILOS 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

PHILOS 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Physics Courses

PHYSICS 103. Fundamentals of Physics I. 5 Credits.

A non-calculus physics sequence covering fundamentals of mechanics, energy, power, thermodynamics and sound. Applications to the areas of biology, chemistry, the earth science and technology. Full credit will not be granted for both PHYSICS 103 and 201 or 202.
P: MATH 104 with at least a C grade or Math Placement of MATH 202 or greater.

PHYSICS 104. Fundamentals of Physics II. 5 Credits.

A non-calculus physics sequence covering fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, electronics, light, atomic and nuclear structure and relativity. Applications to the areas of biology, chemistry, the earth science and technology. Full credit will not be granted for both PHYSICS 104 and (201 or 202).
P: PHYSICS 103 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 141. Astronomy. 3 Credits.

A study of the solar system, stars, galaxies and universe.

PHYSICS 180. Concepts of Physics. 3 Credits.

Survey of physics, including motion, forces, momentum, energy, solids, liquids, gases, sound, heat, electricity, magnetism, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Designed for non science majors. Full credit will not be granted for both PHYSICS 180 and 103, 104, 201 or 202.

PHYSICS 181. Concepts of Physics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany PHYSICS 180. Full credit will not be granted for both PHYSICS 181 and 103, 104, 201 or 202.
P: PHYSICS 180 or conc enr.

PHYSICS 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

PHYSICS 201. Principles of Physics I. 5 Credits.

A calculus physics sequence for students of science and engineering. Includes fundamentals of mechanics, Newton's laws, momentum, energy, fluid statics and dynamics; temperature, heat transfer, thermodynamics; vibrations, waves and sound; electric forces and fields, DC and AC circuits, magnetism; atomic structure, semiconductors; electromagnetic waves, light; relativity, quantum mechanics, nuclear physics and elementary particles.
P: MATH 202 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 202. Principles of Physics II. 5 Credits.

A calculus physics sequence for students of science and engineering. Includes fundamentals of mechanics, Newton's laws, momentum, energy, fluid statics and dynamics; temperature, heat transfer, thermodynamics; vibrations, waves and sound; electric forces and fields, DC and AC circuits, magnetism; atomic structure, semiconductors; electromagnetic waves, light; relativity, quantum mechanics, nuclear physics and elementary particles.
P: PHYSICS 201 with at least a C grade and MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 310. Modern Physics. 3 Credits.

Modern physics has opened the door to exciting areas of exploration: very fast, very small, and very large. This course first examines the fast and small (relativity and elementary particle physics) then applies them to the large scale field of cosmology.

PHYSICS 320. Thermodynamics and Kinetics. 3 Credits.

Temperature, heat and work, thermodynamic properties of gases, solids and solutions; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria; thermodynamics of electrochemical cells; statistical thermodynamics; calculation of thermodynamic properties; chemical kinetics.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade and PHYSICS 202 with at least a C grade and MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 321. Structure of Matter. 3 Credits.

Integrated approach to the concepts of physical chemistry and modern physics: introduction to quantum theory, symmetry, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, X-rays, properties of gases, liquids and solids.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade and PHYSICS 202 with at least a C grade and MATH 203 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 322. Thermodynamics and Kinetics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 320.
P: CHEM 320 or conc enr or PHYSICS 320 or conc enr.; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

PHYSICS 323. Structure of Matter Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany CHEM 321.
P: CHEM 321 or conc enr or PHYSICS 321 or conc enr.; and ENV SCI 207 or conc enr or HUM BIOL 207 or conc enr.

PHYSICS 404. Electricity and Magnetism. 3 Credits.

An advanced approach to electrical and magnetic phenomena; waveguides, electrical energy generation and transmission, Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves, electric and magnetic properties of matter.
P: PHYSICS 202 with at least a C grade and MATH 209 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 415. Solar and Alternate Energy Systems. 3 Credits.

Study of alternate energy systems which may be the important energy sources in the future, such as solar, wind, biomass, fusion, ocean thermal, fuel cells and magneto hydrodynamics.
P: PHYSICS 104 with at least a C grade or 202 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 417. Nuclear Physics and Radiochemistry. 3 Credits.

Properties and reactions of atomic nuclei; application of the properties of radioactive nuclei to the solution of chemical, physical, biological and environmental problems.
P: CHEM 212 and 214 with at least a C grade and PHYSICS 202 with at least a C grade: REC: CHEM 321.

PHYSICS 420. Advanced Physics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Upper-level experiments in Nuclear Physics, Optics and the experimental determination of fundamental physical constants.
P: MATH 203 with at least a C grade, PHYSICS 310 with at least a C grade.

PHYSICS 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

PHYSICS 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

PHYSICS 520. Thermodynamics and Kinetics. 3 Credits.

Temperature, heat and work, thermodynamic properties of gases, solids and solutions; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria; thermodynamics of electrochemical cells; statistical thermodynamics; calculation of thermodynamic properties; chemical kinetics.
P: gr st.

PHYSICS 615. Solar and Alternate Energy Systems. 3 Credits.

Study of alternate energy systems which may be the important energy sources in the future, such as solar, wind, biomass, fusion, ocean thermal, fuel cells and magneto hydrodynamics.
P: gr st.

PHYSICS 617. Nuclear Physics and Radiochemistry. 3 Credits.

Properties and reactions of atomic nuclei; application of the properties of radioactive nuclei to the solution of chemical, physical, biological and environmental problems.
P: gr st.

Political Science Courses

POL SCI 100. Global Politics and Society. 3 Credits.

The course explores political power and human connections on a global scale. The course covers concepts and ideas on the interaction of governments, organizations, and peoples across regions, cultures, and communities. The course helps students develop a global outlook on their future prospects as citizens and professionals in a globalized world.

POL SCI 101. American Government and Politics. 3 Credits.

The institutions and political processes of American National government and the nature of political analysis; the Constitution, ideological and cultural bases of American politics; the role of political parties, elections and interest groups; policy-making processes in the Congress, the presidency and courts.

POL SCI 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

POL SCI 202. Introduction to Public Policy. 3 Credits.

Contemporary issues in American public policy. Substantive public policies such as those dealing with the American economy, energy, crime, environmental quality, the welfare state and social programs. Models of the policy process are also considered.

POL SCI 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

POL SCI 301. Environmental Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

U.S. and global environmental problems and their political implications. Emphasizes U.S. environmental politics, issues and controversies in environmental protection policy, the performance of governmental institution in response to environmental challenges, and strategies for environmental improvement.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202.

POL SCI 305. Urban Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

Structures and operations of city governments and their responses to policy issues such as education, employment, social welfare, housing, transportation, migration, racial discrimination, urban sprawl and social inequality.
P: jr st; and POL SCI 101 or UR RE ST 100.

POL SCI 306. Regulatory Policy and Administration. 3 Credits.

The origins, purposes and operation of regulatory agencies and the programs in the U.S.: theories of regulation, issues and controversies in regulatory policy, and decision-making in such areas as economic regulation, public health, consumer protection workplace safety and environmental quality.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202.

POL SCI 310. The American Presidency. 3 Credits.

The president's role in public policy-making. Topics include the history of the presidency, presidential elections, the nature and use of presidential power, the organization and operation of the executive office, the presidential relationship with Congress and the bureaucracy, and presidential leadership.
P: POL SCI 101.

POL SCI 312. Community Politics. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes the historical dimensions of community politics in the U.S. It also explores the role of grass roots social movements in shaping local politics.
P: none; REC: POL SCI 101.

POL SCI 314. Administrative Law. 3 Credits.

Administrative law in the American federal (intergovernmental) system: connections between administrative law issues and issues of public policy; and legal dimensions of administrative problems.
P: POL SCI 101 or PU EN AF 215.

POL SCI 316. Congress: Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

The role of Congress in American politics and policymaking, including the history of Congress, elections, representation, committees, political parties and leadership, rules and procedures, interest groups and lobbying, presidential-congressional relations, and the role of Congress in both domestic and foreign policy decisions.
P: POL SCI 101.

POL SCI 318. Political Behavior. 3 Credits.

An introduction to political behavior that approaches the topics of elections, public opinion, voting behavior, mass media, and political socialization through the application of quantitative methods of analysis.
P: POL SCI 100 or 101.

POL SCI 320. Constitutional Law. 3 Credits.

The course emphasizes the history of constitutional law in the United States through an analysis of leading Supreme Court cases that deal with government authority as well as citizen rights and civil liberties. Special attention is given to the political and historical context of major cases and the implications for public policy.
P: POL SCI 101.

POL SCI 340. Political Theory. 3 Credits.

The foundations of Western political theory from the Greek polis to the 20th century. Discusses and analyzes leading political theorists in their historical contexts and in terms of their basic ideas and concepts. Attaches the study of politics to the history of Western political thought and practice.
P: POL SCI 100 or 101.

POL SCI 349. American Political Thought. 3 Credits.

The history and development of American political thought, with attention to the thinkers and themes influential to controversies, ideologies, and institutions in American politics.
P: POL SCI 101.

POL SCI 351. Comparative Politics. 3 Credits.

The course examines fundamental concepts in the study of the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. It illustrates the rich diversity of political life, shows available institutional alternatives, explains differences in political regimes and outcomes, and communicates the importance of global political and economic changes.
P: POL SCI 100 or 101.

POL SCI 353. Politics of Developing Areas. 3 Credits.

This course examines contemporary problems of comparative political development and changing patterns of political economy in developing areas. The main focus is on the prospects for democracy and economic prosperity after the Cold War.
P: POL SCI 100 or 101.

POL SCI 360. International Relations. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on competing explanations for interaction between state and non-state actors, and analyzes recent changes in international organizations and the international political economy.
P: POL SCI 100 or 101.

POL SCI 370. Foreign and Defense Policies. 3 Credits.

Explores the institutions and political processes related to U.S. foreign and defense policies, including the international challenges facing the United States, the nation's policy goals and their evolution over time, the strategies used to achieve those goals, and conflicts over policy implementation and its success.

POL SCI 380. Global Environmental Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

This course explores the transnational and international context of environmental politics and policy. Particular focus areas include the causes of environmental harm, the meaning of sustainability, and the relevance of new environmental actors on the global stage.
P: jr st. REC: POL SCI 100.

POL SCI 406. State and Local Government. 3 Credits.

Policy and institutional comparisons across states and local governments through hands-on research, placing a special focus on Wisconsin's local governments.
P: POL SCI 101 or PU EN AF 215.

POL SCI 408. Public Policy Analysis. 3 Credits.

An introduction to public policy analysis and to the policy-making process, primarily in American government. The course emphasizes the political aspects of policy analysis, models and methods for rational design of public policies, and applications of policy studies to particular public problems.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202.

POL SCI 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

POL SCI 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

POL SCI 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

POL SCI 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

POL SCI 505. Urban Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

Structures and operations of city governments and their responses to policy issues such as education, employment, social welfare, housing, transportation, migration, racial discrimination, urban sprawl and social inequality.
P: gr st.

POL SCI 506. Regulatory Policy and Administration. 3 Credits.

The origins, purposes and operation of regulatory agencies and the programs in the U.S.: theories of regulation, issues and controversies in regulatory policy, and decision-making in such areas as economic regulation, public health, consumer protection workplace safety and environmental quality.
P: gr st.

POL SCI 514. Administrative Law. 3 Credits.

Administrative law in the American federal (intergovernmental) system: connections between administrative law issues and issues of public policy; and legal dimensions of administrative problems.
P: gr st.

POL SCI 516. Congress: Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

Legislative institutions and policies, emphasizing the U.S. Congress. The role of legislature in American politics; elections, representation, formal and informal legislative institutions and practices, leadership, interest groups and lobbying, and the role of legislatures in policy innovation. P: gr st. (S)
P: gr st.

POL SCI 608. Public Policy Analysis. 3 Credits.

An introduction to public policy analysis and to the policy-making process, primarily in American government. The course emphasizes the political aspects of policy analysis, models and methods for rational design of public policies, and applications of policy studies to particular public problems.
P: gr st.

POL SCI 610. Intergovernmental Relations. 3 Credits.

The relations among the federal, state and local units of government; federalism, intergovernmental revenues and expenditures, intergovernmental policies and grants in-aid. P: gr st. (F)
P: gr st.

Psychology Courses

PSYCH 102. Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credits.

Understanding of behavior from psychophysiological, cognitive, social and clinical perspectives; important issues, methods and findings in the study of psychological process.

PSYCH 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

PSYCH 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

PSYCH 300. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 Credits.

Experimental methods in psychological research; designing and drawing conclusions from experimental research; critiques of research reports; individual and group laboratory projects.
P: PSYCH 102; COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260 or BUS ADM 215 and 217 or BUS ADM 216. REC: COMM SCI 205.

PSYCH 305. Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the causes and effects of stereotyping and prejudice from a psychological perspective. It also explores when stereotypes are used, how they are measured, and how they can be reduced.
P: PSYCH 102.

PSYCH 308. Physiological Psychology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. Basic sensory, motor, and brain mechanisms are described in reference to normal and abnormal behaviors. Drugs and hormone effects on infants and adults are also discussed.
P: PSYCH 102 AND HUM BIOL 102 or BIOLOGY 202.

PSYCH 310. Drugs and Behavior. 3 Credits.

Psychoactive drugs will be studied regarding their effects on the brain, behaviors and society.
P: PSYCH 102 AND HUM BIOL 102 or BIOLOGY 202.

PSYCH 330. Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

An exploration of theory, method, and empirical results regarding individual behavior in groups. Major topics include social cognition, aggression, helping, and attraction.
P: PSYCH 102 AND Psych 300 or COMM SCI 301 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 350. Psychology and Culture. 3 Credits.

A cross-cultural examination of core psychological processes and areas of study, such as cognition, emotion, development, and personality.
P: Sophomore status; PSYCH 102.

PSYCH 390. Environmental Psychology. 3 Credits.

Human-environment relationships; examines ways in which the physical environment influences human behavior.
P: PSYCH 102.

PSYCH 401. Psychology of Women. 3 Credits.

The psychology of women examines traditional and feminist approaches to women in psychological theory and research as frameworks for understanding women's development and experience in family, academic, work, and relationship roles. The interacting influences of biology, socialization, and cultural context are considered.
P: PSYCH 102.

PSYCH 415. Organizational and Personnel Psychology. 3 Credits.

Examines the human side of organizations from a scientific framework. Topics include job analysis, performance appraisal, employee selection, training, motivation, job satisfaction, work teams, leadership, and organization development.
P: jr. st.; PSYCH 102 AND Psych 300 or COMM SCI 301 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 417. Psychology of Cognitive Processes. 3 Credits.

Contemporary theory and research on thinking processes; how people understand and interpret events around them; attention, recognition, thinking, memory, language, imagery and problem-solving.
P: jr. st.; PSYCH 102 AND Psych 300 or COMM SCI 301 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 420. Test and Measurements. 3 Credits.

An overview of the uses and underlying psychometric concepts of psychological tests. Examines selected tests in the areas of intelligence, personality, achievement, and interest assessment. Discusses controversial social, legal, ethical, and cultural issues related to testing.
P: jr. st.; PSYCH 102 AND upper level Psch or Hum Dev course AND Psych 300 or COMM SCI 301 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 424. Psychology of Emotion. 3 Credits.

This is an advanced undergraduate psychology course designed to expose students to the science of emotion. Students will become acquainted with the many ways in which biological, cultural, cognitive, and other factors can contribute to our emotions.
P: PSYCH 102 and PSYCH 300 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 429. Theories of Personality. 3 Credits.

Major ideas about the organization, function, change and development of human personality as discussed by a variety of personality theorists.
P: PSYCH 102 AND Psych 300 or COMM SCI 301 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 430. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Credits.

Major schools, figures, trends and systems of thought in the field of psychology; shifts in the conceptualization of the problems, phenomena, methods and tasks for psychology.
P: PSYCH 102 and 300 and one upper level Psych course and jr st.

PSYCH 435. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits.

Major psychological, biological, and sociocultural models of abnormal behavior, including problems of childhood, adolescence, and aging. Contextual issues are emphasized, including the influence of culture, social class, and gender on diagnosis and treatment.
P: PSYCH 102.

PSYCH 438. Counseling and Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

This class provides an introduction to many contemporary approaches to counseling and their theoretical and research base. It also addresses issues relevant to professional practice in the field, along with the roles of development, values, ethics, and context/culture in the counseling process.
P: PSYCH 102 AND Psych 300 or COMM SCI 301 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 440. Multicultural Counseling and Mental Health. 3 Credits.

This course involves an exploration of cultural groups, beliefs, and practices within the U.S. and focuses on ways that culture, race, ethnicity, and associated concepts, such as oppression and privilege, influence definitions and treatments of mental illness.
P: Jr st; PSYCH 102 AND Psych 435 or 438.

PSYCH 450. Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course examines how health, illness, and medicine can be studied from a psychological perspective. Topics include coping with stress, leading a healthy lifestyle, factors influencing smoking, alcohol use, and exercise, the patient-practitioner interaction, and chronic and terminal illness.
P: jr. st.; PSYCH 102 AND Psych 300 or COMM SCI 301 or HUM DEV 302.

PSYCH 460. Clinical Child Psychology. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of psychiatric disorders that occur during childhood and adolescence.
P: PSYCH 102 AND Psych 435 or 438.

PSYCH 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

PSYCH 494. Senior Capstone in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Exploration of a particular topic pertaining to psychology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The topic will vary from semester to semester.
P: PSYCH 300; senior status REC: To be taken in the last semester before you graduate.

PSYCH 495. Teaching Assistantship. 1-6 Credits.

Students will learn the different components related to successful instruction. This will include theoretical perspective, empirical research, and pedagogical techniques relating to teaching that they can apply to a broad array of future teaching and learning experiences.
P: PSYCH 102 or Hum Dev 210, and 3.0 GPA in Human Dev/Psych, and consent of inst; REC: sr st.

PSYCH 496. Research Assistantship. 1-6 Credits.

Students will assist faculty in conducting research. Responsibilities may include literature reviews, library investigations, questionnaire development, recruitment and interviewing of research participants, data collection, management of research studies, data entry, and some statistical analysis.
P: PSYCH 102 and consent of instr. REC: PSYCH 300 or COMM SCI 205.

PSYCH 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st and gpa > or = 3.00.

PSYCH 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

PSYCH 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

PSYCH 615. Organizational and Personnel Psychology. 3 Credits.

Examines the human side of organizations from a scientific framework. Topics include job analysis, performance appraisal, employee selection, training, motivation, job satisfaction, work teams, leadership, and organization development.
P: gr st.

PSYCH 620. Test and Measurements. 3 Credits.

An overview of the uses and underlying psychometric concepts of psychological tests. Examines selected tests in the areas of intelligence, personality, achievement, and interest assessment. Discusses controversial social, legal, ethical, and cultural issues related to testing.
P: gr st.

PSYCH 629. Theories of Personality. 3 Credits.

P: gr st.

Public and Environmental Affairs Courses

PU EN AF 102. Environment and Society. 3 Credits.

An examination of the relationship between humans and the biophysical environment at local, national, and global levels. Emphasis is given to the impact of personal attitudes, cultural beliefs, economics, politics, technology and available resources on environmental problems and solutions.

PU EN AF 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

PU EN AF 202. Introduction to Public Policy. 3 Credits.

Contemporary issues in American public policy. Substantive public policies such as those dealing with the American economy, energy, crime, environmental quality, the welfare state and social programs. Models of the policy process are also considered.

PU EN AF 215. Introduction to Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Using case studies, this course explores the principal tools and methods for conducting public affairs, the external and internal elements affecting public agencies, and the role of these elements and the human dimension in creating and implementing public policies and programs.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202.

PU EN AF 250. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). 2 Credits.

Computerized Geographic Information Systems (GIS) represent revolutionary software advancement that allow sophisticated information management, analysis and mapping with computer systems. In this class you will learn basic principles for creation and analysis of digital maps, cartographic concepts, and experience an intensive introduction to GIS software (e.g., ArcGIS).

PU EN AF 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

PU EN AF 301. Environmental Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

U.S. and global environmental problems and their political implications. Emphasizes U.S. environmental politics, issues and controversies in environmental protection policy, the performance of governmental institution in response to environmental challenges, and strategies for environmental improvement.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202.

PU EN AF 305. Natural Resources Economic Policy. 3 Credits.

Acquaints the student with policies leading to arrangements for the development, management, and use of natural resources. Emphasizes the longer time horizon required for the conservation of resources and a general concern for the quality of ecosystems.
P: ECON 203.

PU EN AF 306. Regulatory Policy and Administration. 3 Credits.

The origins, purposes and operation of regulatory agencies and the programs in the U.S.: theories of regulation, issues and controversies in regulatory policy, and decision-making in such areas as economic regulation, public health, consumer protection workplace safety and environmental quality.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202.

PU EN AF 314. Administrative Law. 3 Credits.

Administrative law in the American federal (intergovernmental) system: connections between administrative law issues and issues of public policy; and legal dimensions of administrative problems.
P: POL SCI 101 or PU EN AF 215.

PU EN AF 315. Public and Non-Profit Management. 3 Credits.

Using case studies and applied learning techniques, this course explores management in public and nonprofit organizations from the perspective of a manager. Management approaches, techniques and concepts and theoretical frameworks are covered.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202; REC: PU EN AF 215.

PU EN AF 321. Coastal Resources Policy and Management. 3 Credits.

The importance of coastal resources, with an emphasis on Wisconsin's coasts. With field trips to local lakes and Lake Superior, we will study issues of development, overuse, risk, and their consequent environmental, aesthetic and economic impacts.

PU EN AF 322. Environmental Planning. 3 Credits.

History, processes, and impacts of environmental planning in the United States. Action forcing legislation and its effect on environmental issues and processes. Emphasizes environmental planning and implementation at the national, state, and local levels.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202; REC: ENV SCI 102.

PU EN AF 323. Sustainable Land Use. 3 Credits.

Various forms of public land-use controls in planning and administration, addressing "what, why and how" aspects of land-use controls. Smart Growth, Environmental Impact Analysis, and other comprehensive planning models studied.
P: jr st.

PU EN AF 324. Transitioning to Sustainable Communities. 3 Credits.

Creating resilient communities based on local inputs/outputs to support jobs, housing, transportation, schools, agriculture and city services.

PU EN AF 335. Principles and Practices of Emergency Management. 3 Credits.

The philosophy of comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendent steps, which include mitigation, preparedness, response and recover. In addition, legal issues involving state and Federal law effecting emergency operations will be studied.
REC: PU EN AF 315.

PU EN AF 336. Strategic Emergency Preparedness, Planning and Implementation. 3 Credits.

Strategic planning and budgeting is a very important component in emergency planning and mitigation. Learn how to acquire and allocate resources, plan for crises with or without warning, and implement preparedness programs.

PU EN AF 337. Disaster Response Operations and Management. 3 Credits.

Examine the roles and responsibilities of the players in a crisis event. Explore the various problems associated with response operations such as: inadequate preparedness measurers, safety and site security, politics, and record keeping.

PU EN AF 338. Disaster Recovery. 3 Credits.

Examine disaster recovery in isolation. Explore the short and long term effects of disasters, as well as, the process of putting families, businesses and communities back together. You will learn the importance of reconstruction and relocation.

PU EN AF 339. Political and Policy Dimensions of Emergency Management. 3 Credits.

This course considers the political and policy environment in which emergency management is practiced. It focuses on political processes and phenomena associated with mitigating the likely effects of extreme events, responding to them, and recovering from them. The course is intended to help emergency managers develop an understanding of local, state, federal, and intergovernmental politics affecting and affected by extreme events.

PU EN AF 344. Leadership in Organizations. 3 Credits.

Roles, functions and environments of organizational managers and leaders broadly defined, especially in public enterprises; issues of human resources management within these sectors.

PU EN AF 350. GIS in Public and Environmental Policy. 2 Credits.

Uses state-of-the-art software to integrate digitized data maps, transfer data, manage relational data bases, overlay maps, display, query, edit interactive graphics, and geocode addresses. Focus is upon GIS applications tailored to public and environmental policy, e.g., tax base analysis, property mapping, natural resources inventory, crime demography, transportation routing, natural hazards, and emergency management.
P: PU EN AF 250.

PU EN AF 351. Water Resources Policy and Management. 3 Credits.

This course will cover the basics of water management and planning, covering local to global examples of such things as surface water pollution, mining of fossil aquifers, water wars at regional, interstate, and international levels.
P: PU EN AF 102 or ENV SCI 102.

PU EN AF 378. Environmental Law. 3 Credits.

An overview of major environmental laws such as the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, with emphasis on how these laws are implemented by the federal and state governments.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202 or 215.

PU EN AF 379. Natural Resources Policy, Law, and Administration. 3 Credits.

This course examines public land and resources policy, law and administration from multiple perspectives. It covers environmental and administrative decision making and various contemporary resource management problems and conflicts.
P: POL SCI 101 or Pu En Af 201.

PU EN AF 380. Global Environmental Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

This course explores the transnational and international context of environmental politics and policy. Particular focus areas include the causes of environmental harm, the meaning of sustainability, and the relevance of new environmental actors on the global stage.
P: jr st. REC: POL SCI 100.

PU EN AF 390. Colloquium in Environmental Sustainability & Business. 1 Credit.

Required component of the Certificate in Environmental Sustainability and Business. Focus is placed be upon the nature of systems thinking systems dynamics, and problem solving. Will address systems dynamics in natural world policy creation, human creativity and the arts, and business decision making. Latter half of class is applications focussed.
P: jr st & EMBI certificate enrollment.

PU EN AF 402. Environmental and Resource Economics. 3 Credits.

Applications of tools such as cost-benefit analysis and other economic concepts in current public decision making, with special emphasis upon common property resources management.
P: ECON 303 or 305.

PU EN AF 406. State and Local Government. 3 Credits.

Policy and institutional comparisons across states and local governments through hands-on research, placing a special focus on Wisconsin's local governments.
P: POL SCI 101 or PU EN AF 215.

PU EN AF 407. Service in the Public Sector. 3 Credits.

This course explores what is meant by public service, with a special focus on service in local governmental settings. The course considers case studies from the International City/Council Management Association and what management and leadership in local government entails.
REC: PU EN AF 215.

PU EN AF 408. Public Policy Analysis. 3 Credits.

An introduction to public policy analysis and to the policy-making process, primarily in American government. The course emphasizes the political aspects of policy analysis, models and methods for rational design of public policies, and applications of policy studies to particular public problems.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202.

PU EN AF 409. Public Finance and Fiscal Policy. 3 Credits.

Effects of government spending and taxation on resource allocation, incomes, prices and employment. Includes consideration of the uses and effects of fiscal policy.
P: ECON 203.

PU EN AF 415. Public and Nonprofit Budgeting. 3 Credits.

The purposes and attributes of major public budgetary systems: principles and methods in designing and managing relationships among program planning, policy planning and budgetary operation; applications of analytical and decision-assisting tools in public budgetary operations.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202 or 215.

PU EN AF 425. Fundraising and Marketing for Nonprofits. 3 Credits.

The course is designed for students aspiring to manage a nonprofit or serve on a Board of Directors. Students learn about creating a sustainable nonprofit by developing broad based fundraising strategies and by marketing the organization to create a positive community immage.
P: PU EN AF 215; REC PU EN AF 315.

PU EN AF 426. Strategic Philanthropy: Civic Engagement Through Giving. 3 Credits.

A hands-on course where students learn the motives, methods, and values of philanthropy by studying local data, working woith nonprofits and donors, and allocating funds (provided by community partners) to organizations in the community. Appropriate for all majors.
P: Junior status REC: One or more of PU EN AF 315, 425 or 428.

PU EN AF 428. Public and Nonprofit Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Develops a working understanding and selected skills relating to the conduct of program evaluations. Evaluation design, data collection, data analysis, and utilization of findings are discussed using the political and social context of "real" organizations.
P: POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202; REC: COMM SCI 301; PU EN AF 408.

PU EN AF 430. Seminar in Ethics and Public Action. 3 Credits.

A capstone course intended to introduce a range of ethical concerns in public affairs. Through theoretical and case study readings and applied projects, students deal with ethical issues and varied responses to them.
P: Senior standing.

PU EN AF 450. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credits.

Project-based course using ArcGIS. Students define a project, develop a database, analyze spatial data, and develop GIS maps displaying results of their analysis.
P: GEOG 350 or PU EN AF 350.

PU EN AF 452. Planning Theory and Methods. 3 Credits.

Planning for public and not-for-profit agencies: theory and practical significance of planning; the political and administrative setting of planning operations; and methods of planning analysis such as strategic planning.
P: BUS ADM 215 or COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260.

PU EN AF 453. Cost Benefit Analysis. 3 Credits.

Application of tools and concepts in current economic decision making, with special emphasis upon Natural Resource management, environmental problems, market failure, and public policy approaches.

PU EN AF 461. Special Topics in Public and Environmental Affairs. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary study of public policy issues selected from public administration and environmental policy and planning. Includes issues such as health care reform, environmental policy analysis, policy planning.

PU EN AF 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

PU EN AF 490. EMBI Co-Op/Experience. 3 Credits.

Required component of the Certificate in Environmental Sustainability and Business. Enrolled students will be placed by EMBI in a business, nonprofit, or governmental setting that involves interdisciplinary problem solving within an environmental sustainability context. This will be a special co-op/internship/project experience.
P: Junior standing and enrollment in Environmental Sustainability and Business certificate program.

PU EN AF 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

PU EN AF 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

PU EN AF 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

PU EN AF 506. Regulatory Policy and Administration. 3 Credits.

The origins, purposes and operation of regulatory agencies and the programs in the U.S.: theories of regulation, issues and controversies in regulatory policy, and decision-making in such areas as economic regulation, public health, consumer protection workplace safety and environmental quality.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 514. Administrative Law. 3 Credits.

Administrative law in the American federal (intergovernmental) system: connections between administrative law issues and issues of public policy; and legal dimensions of administrative problems.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 522. Environmental Planning. 3 Credits.

History, processes, and impacts of environmental planning in the United States. Action forcing legislation and its effect on environmental issues and processes. Emphasizes environmental planning and implementation at the national, state, and local levels.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 535. Principles and Practices of Emergency Management. 3 Credits.

The philosophy of comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendent steps, which include mitigation, preparedness, response and recover. In addition, legal issues involving state and Federal law effecting emergency operations will be studied.
REC: PU EN AF 315.

PU EN AF 536. Strategic Emergency Preparedness, Planning and Implementation. 3 Credits.

Strategic planning and budgeting is a very important component in emergency planning and mitigation. Learn how to acquire and allocate resources, plan for crises with or without warning, and implement preparedness programs.

PU EN AF 537. Disaster Response Operations and Management. 3 Credits.

Examine the roles and responsibilities of the players in a crisis event. Explore the various problems associated with response operations such as: inadequate preparedness measurers, safety and site security, politics, and record keeping.

PU EN AF 538. Disaster Recovery. 3 Credits.

Examine disaster recovery in isolation. Explore the short and long term effects of disasters, as well as, the process of putting families, businesses and communities back together. You will learn the importance of reconstruction and relocation.

PU EN AF 551. Water Resources Policy and Management. 3 Credits.

This course will cover the basics of water management and planning, covering local to global examples of such things as surface water pollution, mining of fossil aquifers, water wars at regional, interstate, and international levels.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 559. Political and Policy Dimensions of Emergency Management. 3 Credits.

This course considers the political and policy environment in which emergency management is practiced. It focuses on political processes and phenomena associated with mitigating the likely effects of extreme events, responding to them, and recovering from them. The course is intended to help emergency managers develop an understanding of local, state, federal, and intergovernmental politics affecting and affected by extreme events.

PU EN AF 578. Environmental Law. 3 Credits.

An overview of major environmental laws such as the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, with emphasis on how these laws are implemented by the federal and state governments.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 579. Natural Resource Policy, Law, and Administration. 3 Credits.

This course examines public land and resources policy, law and administration from multiple perspectives. It covers environmental and administrative decision making and various contemporary resource management problems and conflicts. A number of substantive policy areas are examined including national forests, public rangelands, wildlife and biodiversity, and protected areas, among others. These substantive areas are approached and analyzed in a number of different ways.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 580. Global Environmental Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

This course explores the transnational and international context of environmental politics and policy. Particular focus areas include the causes of environmental harm, the meaning of sustainability, and the relevance of new environmental actors on the global stage.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 602. Environmental and Resource Economics. 3 Credits.

Applications of tools such as cost-benefit analysis and other economic concepts in current public decision making, with special emphasis upon common property resources management.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 608. Public Policy Analysis. 3 Credits.

An introduction to public policy analysis and to the policy-making process, primarily in American government. The course emphasizes the political aspects of policy analysis, models and methods for rational design of public policies, and applications of policy studies to particular public problems.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 615. Public and Nonprofit Budgeting. 3 Credits.

The purposes and attributes of major public budgetary systems: principles and methods in designing and managing relationships among program planning, policy planning and budgetary operation; applications of analytical and decision-assisting tools in public budgetary operations.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 650. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credits.

Project-based course using ARC/INFO software. Students adopt a study area, develop data layers, analyze these data and develop GIS maps showing results of the analysis.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 652. Planning Theory and Methods. 3 Credits.

Planning for public and not-for-profit agencies: theory and practical significance of planning; the political and administrative setting of planning operations; and methods of planning analysis such as strategic planning.
P: gr st.

PU EN AF 653. Cost Benefit Analysis. 3 Credits.

Social Work Courses

SOC WORK 202. Introduction to Human Services. 3 Credits.

Overview of career opportunities in the human services; explores such fields of practice as aging, corrections, alcohol and substance abuse, child welfare, mental health and the developmentally disabled.

SOC WORK 250. You and Your Future: Living and Working in an Aging Society. 3 Credits.

This interactive service learning course explores contemporary topics in aging including anti-aging technology, multi-generational workplace issues, public policy issues, family and intergenerational caregiving, and programs and services for older adults. Second Life virtual reality technology is used in the course.

SOC WORK 275. Foundations of Social Welfare Policy. 3 Credits.

Overview of the U.S. social welfare institution, including the development of policies and services to meet social problems and the institutional arrangements that provide people with the resources and services to meet their needs.
P: ENG COMP 105 or conc enr.

SOC WORK 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SOC WORK 300. Field Experience in a Human Service Agency. 1 Credit.

Introductory exposure to working in a social services agency; professionally supervised program of observation and assistance in the agency.
P: conc enr in SOC WORK 370.

SOC WORK 305. The Social Work Profession. 3 Credits.

Orientation to the knowledge, skills and values of professional social work practice. Definition of professional competencies expected of a Bachelor of Social Work graduate and their relationship to field training experience.
P: major in Soc Work; ENG COMP 105; SOC WORK 275 or conc enr.; conc enr. in SOC WORK 313.

SOC WORK 313. Social Work Skills Lab I. 1 Credit.

Instruction and practice in basic interviewing skills for the beginning social work professional.
P: conc enr in SOC WORK 305.

SOC WORK 323. Social Work Skills Lab II. 1 Credit.

Instruction and practice in interpersonal skills required for working with other professionals, including use of supervision, teamwork, mediation, negotiation, referral and conflict management.
P: conc enr in SOC WORK 370.

SOC WORK 330. Understanding Diversity, Challenging Oppression: A Service Learning Course for Helping Professionals. 3 Credits.

Service learning course on working with diverse groups and communities for persons considering a career in the helping professions.
P: Sophomore status.

SOC WORK 351. Overview of the Child Welfare System. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the place of child welfare policies and services among society's general provisions for family welfare and support. Overview of child welfare programs and services and the broad principles underlying delivery of services.
P: SOC WORK 305.

SOC WORK 370. Social Work Methods I. 3 Credits.

Application of social work methods to planned changes with organizations and communities; explores how agency and community contexts shape social work practice.
P: SOC WORK 305.

SOC WORK 371. Human Behavior and the Social Environment. 3 Credits.

Examines the biological, psychological, social-structural and cultural sources of the behavior of individuals and organizations from the perspective of systems analysis, human diversity and goal-directed behavior; applications to social work practice.
P: SOC WORK 305 and HUM BIOL 102.

SOC WORK 380. Cross Cultural Diversity and the Helping Professions. 3 Credits.

Students who will work with diverse individuals and groups seeking professional services will learn to do so in a culturally relevant manner. Course content specifically focuses on the application of culturally relevant work in the helping professions.
P: sophomore standing.

SOC WORK 395. Special Topics in Social Work. 1-3 Credits.

In-depth coverage of topics not covered by regular courses, such as substance use, mental health problems, interpersonal violence, PTSD, aging, homelessness, LGBTQ issues, religion, spirituality, globalization, and others. Offerings of different topics can be repeated for credit.
P: so st.; REC: ENG COMP 105.

SOC WORK 402. Field Practicum I. 5 Credits.

Actual social service work through placement in a social service agency.
P: conc enr in SOC WORK 411.

SOC WORK 403. Field Practicum II. 5 Credits.

Actual social service work through placement in a social service agency.
P: SOC WORK 402 and conc enr in 420.

SOC WORK 411. Social Work Methods II. 3 Credits.

Application of social work methods with individuals, families and groups; focus on assessment, planning and intervention strategies with an introduction to evaluation and termination processes.
P: SOC WORK 370.

SOC WORK 413. Social Work Skills Lab III. 1 Credit.

Instruction and practice in advanced interviewing skills needed by the beginning social work professional.
P: conc enr in SOC WORK 411.

SOC WORK 420. Social Work Methods III. 3 Credits.

Theory and methods of planned change interventions with specific populations at risk; integration of micro and macro level practice, with an emphasis on community organizing; evaluation of practice; and termination.
P: SOC WORK 411.

SOC WORK 423. Social Work Skills Lab IV. 1 Credit.

Instruction and practice in professional interactional skills focusing on small and large groups, and specialized intervention skills.
P: conc enr in SOC WORK 420.

SOC WORK 431. Social Policy Analysis I. 2 Credits.

Instruction and practice in analyzing social problems and related policies; observation with local government policy making; application of skills to specific policy and its implementation in the community.
P: SOC WORK 370 and conc enr in 461.

SOC WORK 433. Social Policy Analysis II. 2 Credits.

Theory and methods for planned social policy change; development and implementation of a planned change project as a follow up to the social problem and policy analyzed in Social Policy Analysis I.
P: SOC WORK 431 and conc enr in 463.

SOC WORK 451. Child Welfare Practice. 3 Credits.

Overview of social work practice in child welfare. Examinations of nature and causes of child maltreatment and the role of child welfare. Exploration of the ways practice principles in child welfare are applied in the assessment and intervention phases of helping in the delivery of services.
P: SOC WORK 351 and 370.

SOC WORK 461. Program Evaluation I. 2 Credits.

Introduction to the principles of program evaluation and community research. Design and implement an evaluation research project.
P: COMM SCI 301; SOC WORK 370; conc enr in SOC WORK 431.

SOC WORK 463. Program Evaluation II. 2 Credits.

Introduction to program evaluation designs; analyze and interpret data from community research project; make recommendations for new or changed programs or policies.
P: SOC WORK 461; conc enr in SOC WORK 433.

SOC WORK 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

SOC WORK 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

SOC WORK 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

SOC WORK 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SOC WORK 699. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SOC WORK 701. Ethical Issues in Contemporary Social Work. 3 Credits.

This foundation course is designed to introduce MSW students to wide-ranging ethical issues that practitioners in various settings.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 702. Generalist Practice I. 3 Credits.

This course promotes masters' level development of skills necessary to practice social work with diverse individuals and family groups.
P: Admission to MSW Program.

SOC WORK 703. Skills Lab with Individuals, Families and Small Groups. 1 Credit.

This skills lab introduces students to a range of skills required for effective practice with individuals, families and small groups.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 704. Generalist Social Work Practice II. 3 Credits.

This course promotes masters' level development of skills necessary to practice social work with diverse groups within organizations and communities.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 705. Skills Lab with Large Groups and Communities. 1 Credit.

This skills lab introduces students to a range of skills required for effective practice with various professional and community groups, with organizations, and with communities.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 706. Social Welfare Institutions. 3 Credits.

This course examines the origins of and changes in American social welfare arrangements to meet human needs. It traces the evolution of the social work profession and social welfare efforts in relation to major economic, social, and political forces over time.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 707. Human Behavior in the Social Environment. 3 Credits.

Integration of theories and models examining the complexity of person/environment functioning with respect to individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 708. Social Welfare Policy: Contemporary Approaches. 3 Credits.

In this course, students evaluate contemporary social policies affecting poor and disenfranchised groups in the U.S. Students are introduced to the processes of policy development and policy change.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 709. Field I: Foundations Social Work Field Practicum. 4 Credits.

Supervised social work practicum experience in a human services agency setting.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 710. Field II: Foundation Social Work Field Practicum. 4 Credits.

Supervised social work practicum experience in a human service agency setting.
P: Admission to the MSW Program.

SOC WORK 720. Practice Competence In a Diverse Community. 3 Credits.

Social work advanced practice course on working with diverse groups and communities.
P: completion of foundation req or advanced st.

SOC WORK 721. Multi-Level Family Intervention. 3 Credits.

Advanced social work practice techniques for direct practice students working with families of many types and in varied settings.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 722. Social Work Management & Supervision in the Social Services. 3 Credits.

Advanced social work practice of management and supervision methods for students working in management positions at any level in social service agencies.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 727. Psychopathology & Strength-Based Assessment. 3 Credits.

This course examines mental health and mental illness from a strengths-based social work perspective. Cultural and community factors in defining these issues are addressed.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 728. Advanced Social Welfare Policy Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course uses an analytical framework for analyzing social welfare policy to examine particular practice concerns. Particular attention is paid to rural/urban differences and to diversity issues.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 729. Field III: Advanced Social Work Field Practicum & Integrative Seminar. 4 Credits.

Supervised social work practicum experience in a human service agency setting.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 731. Advanced Research Applications in Social Work Practice. 3 Credits.

Advanced research course that prepares students to evaluate their own practice and to carry out independent research projects.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 732. Field Research Project. 1 Credit.

Students learn how to conduct evaluation research by carrying out a project in their field unit, Field IV.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 733. Field IV: Advanced Social Work Practicum/Integrative Seminar. 4 Credits.

Supervised social work practicum experience in a human service agency setting.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 734. Field Research Consultation. 2 Credits.

Students work independently with the instructor to complete the required tasks associated with the Field Research Proj. The instructor provides technical assistance, advice, and problem-solving regarding IRB proposals, participant recruitment, data collection and management, data analysis and report development.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 735. Emerging Issues in Child Welfare. 3 Credits.

Advanced standing elective course considering major new issues in child welfare practice, administration, funding and research.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 737. Social Work and Crisis Intervention with Vulnerable Populations. 3 Credits.

This course contributes to development of practice competency with vulnerable and oppressed groups and is for advanced level MSW students. The course teaches crisis intervention and emergency treatment approaches and then applies them to vulnerable populations of males and females in the United States.

SOC WORK 747. Mental Health Theories. 3 Credits.

This course examines the current mental health theories influencing social work direct practice.
P: MSW student.

SOC WORK 757. Treatment and Mistreatment of Offenders. 3 Credits.

Prepares social workers for an understanding of correctional models and their inherent values, bio-psycho-social theories of crime causation, and assessment and intervention skills within a generalist framework.
P: MSW student.

SOC WORK 777. Legal Aspects of Social Work Practice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the understanding of the field of forensic social work practice which includes both criminal and civil issues. Students will learn to conduct forensic assessments, write court reports, act as expert and fact witnesses and facilitate guardianships. The course covers practice knowledge and skills in a variety of contexts including child welfare, juvenile justice, adult corrections, victim/witness services, health/long-term care, mental health, domestic abuse and disability services. Students apply knowledge to ethical dilemmas encountered in the legal system and learn to advocate on behalf of clients.

SOC WORK 795. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

This course provides students an opporunity to strengthen practice while working with clients or agencies are mental health concerns, addictions, or violence issues.
P: completion of foundation curriculum or advanced standing.

SOC WORK 798. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

P: gr st.

Sociology Courses

SOCIOL 202. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

Major sociological concepts and ideas and their application to contemporary problems of societies.

SOCIOL 203. Ethnic and Racial Identities. 3 Credits.

The character of racial, religious and ethnic minority groups; social and economic adjustments in American society; the role of private and public agencies.
P: SOCIOL 202 or ANTHRO 100.

SOCIOL 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SOCIOL 302. Class, Status and Power. 3 Credits.

Class, status and power as determinants of group interests, preferences, ideologies and struggles; examination at the national and international levels.
P: SOCIOL 202.

SOCIOL 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 Credits.

Comparative study of race and ethnic relations in the United States and other countries. The focus is on theories of race relations and ethnic stratification and the importance of these issues in national and international perspective. Case studies of ethnic relations in particular countries (e.g., South Africa, Brazil, Malaysia, Lebanon, Soviet Union) will be emphasized.
P: SOCIOL 202 or 203 or intro level soc sci cse.

SOCIOL 304. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

Foundations of morality and the relationship between morality and deviance; positive and negative aspects of both deviance and conformity.
P: SOCIOL 202.

SOCIOL 307. Social Theory. 3 Credits.

Critical analysis of classical and contemporary social theories with attention to the social and intellectual context and contemporary application.
P: SOCIOL 202.

SOCIOL 308. Sociology of the Family. 3 Credits.

A sociological approach to marriage and families in American society: historical changes in family life; the problems of defining family; social class; ethnicity and gender as key variables in family power; life transitions; and divorce and remarriage.
P: so st; and SOCIOL 202 or Hum Dev 210 or ANTHRO 100.

SOCIOL 310. Urban Sociology. 3 Credits.

The study of social life and population groups in the urban environment. Our concern is with the social and psychological consequences of city life and the political and economic forces which have produced the industrial and corporate cities of the present day. Other topics include theories of "community," the location of industrial and commercial areas, the distribution of racial and ethnic groups, and urban problems such as poverty, housing, and public services.
P: jr st; and UR RE ST 100 or PU EN AF 202 or POL SCI 202 or SOCIOL 202.

SOCIOL 315. Street Gangs in America. 3 Credits.

Organization of and subculture of street gangs in American communities; differences among ethnic/racial street gangs; representation of gang identity through graffiti, tattoos, clothing, music; gang membership and wannabes.
P: SOCIOL 202 or ANTHRO 100 or UR RE ST 100.

SOCIOL 404. Criminology. 3 Credits.

Criminology is a survey of the theories and methods sociologists use to study crime and delinquency. The course presents the disciplinary history of criminology and critically examines the structure and function of the criminal law and punishment.
P: SOCIOL 202 or Soc C D 204; REC: Soc C D 303.

SOCIOL 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

SOCIOL 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

SOCIOL 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Spanish Courses

SPANISH 101. Introduction to the Spanish Language I. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in Spanish.

SPANISH 102. Introduction to the Spanish Language II. 4 Credits.

Development of basic ability in understanding, reading, speaking and writing in Spanish.
P: none; REC: 1 yr h.s. or 1 sem college Spanish.

SPANISH 110. Intro to Spanish in the Professions I. 2 Credits.

Introductory web-enhanced Spanish courses for professionals.

SPANISH 111. Intro to Spanish in the Professions II. 2 Credits.

Introductory web-enhanced Spanish courses for professionals.
P: SPANISH 110.

SPANISH 112. Intro to Spanish in the Professions III. 2 Credits.

Introductory web-enhanced Spanish course for professionals.
P: SPANISH 111.

SPANISH 201. Intermediate Spanish Language I. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read, write and speak Spanish.
P: none; REC: 2 yrs h.s. or 2 sem college Spanish.

SPANISH 202. Intermediate Spanish Language II. 3 Credits.

Further development of the ability to understand, read, write and speak Spanish.
P: none; REC: 3 yrs h.s. or 3 sem college Spanish.

SPANISH 210. Intermediate Spanish in the Professions I. 2 Credits.

Further development of ability to understand reading, speaking, and writing in spanish. Web-enhanced Spanish course for professionals
P: Spanish 114.

SPANISH 211. Intermediate Spanish in the Professions II. 2 Credits.

Further development of ability to understand reading, speaking, and writing in Spanish. Web-enhance Spanish course for professionals.
P: SPANISH 210.

SPANISH 212. Intermediate Spanish in the Professions III. 2 Credits.

Further development of ability to understand reading, speaking, and writing in Spanish. Web-enhanced Spanish course for professionals.
P: SPANISH 211.

SPANISH 214. Intermediate Spanish in the Professions IV. 2 Credits.

Introductory web-enhanced Spanish course for professionals.
P: SPANISH 112.

SPANISH 225. Composition and Conversation I. 3 Credits.

Development of greater fluency through classroom practice in conversation and composition.
P: none; REC: 4 yrs h.s. or 4 sem college Spanish.

SPANISH 226. Composition and Conversation II. 3 Credits.

Continues development of Spanish fluency through practice and study of language. Emphasis on developing accurate use of grammatical structures in written and oral expression.
P: SPANISH 225.

SPANISH 285. Study Abroad: Spain and Latin America. 3-15 Credits.

P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SPANISH 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SPANISH 328. Introduction to Cultural Studies in Spanish. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of a variety of topics related to the cultures of the Spanish speaking world. It incorporates political, social, and cultural perspectives and provides students with academic writing, research, and critical thinking skills in the field of cultural studies.

SPANISH 329. Representative Spanish and Latin American Authors. 3 Credits.

Important novels, plays, poems, and essays representative of major eras and movements of Spanish and Latin American societies foster appreciation of the language and understanding of the literature and culture. Includes different styles of writing and differing treatment of recurring themes. Offered in the language. May be repeated for credit when different author is studied.
P: SPANISH 328 OR SPANISH 225 OR concurrent enrollment in SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 345. Advanced Spanish Grammar. 3 Credits.

In-depth review and continued study of Spanish grammar.
P: SPANISH 226.

SPANISH 351. Major Spanish and Latin American Fiction. 3 Credits.

Study of Spanish short story and/or novels either by period or by theme.
P: SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 355. Spanish and Latin American Cinema. 3 Credits.

Historical and critical introduction to the work of prominent Spanish and Latin American filmmakers and to thematic representations of Spanish and Latin American Cultures.
P: SPANISH 225.

SPANISH 357. Cultura Latina. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to be a query into the nature of Latino/Hispanic Culture in the United States and in the Green Bay area. During the semester we will be discussing in class the changing nature of Latino/Hispanic culture in the United States, as it is reflected in different art media (literature, visual art), cultural theory and mass media.
P: SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 358. Latin America Today. 3 Credits.

Specific humanistic aspects of contemporary Latin American culture, including its history, art, literature, music and value systems.
P: SPANISH 328 OR SPANISH 225 OR concurrent enrollment in SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 359. The Cultures of the Americas. 3 Credits.

A look at the three major cultural influences in Latin America: Amerindian, African, and European. The history of ethnic relations and intercultural contact in the Americas.
P: SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 360. Spain Today. 3 Credits.

Aspects of contemporary Spain, including its cultures, architecture, music, art and values. Credit not granted for both SPANISH 360 and HUM STUD 360.
P: SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 361. The Cultures of Spain. 3 Credits.

This course provides a historical overview of the many cultures that have played a role in the development of what is now Spain.
P: SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 372. Spanish Phonetics. 3 Credits.

Survey of descriptive linguistics with emphasis on the sound system of Spanish.
P: SPANISH 226 or SPANISH 225.

SPANISH 438. Major Spanish and Latin American Writer(s). 3 Credits.

Study of an outstanding figure in Spanish and Latin American literatures.
P: SPANISH 328 OR SPANISH 225 OR concurrent enrollment in SPANISH 328.

SPANISH 465. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

This variable content course will allow students to analyze seminal aspects pertaining to the language, history and cultures of Spain, Latin America and the Spanish-speaking communities in the United States.
P: SPANISH 328 OR SPANISH 225 OR concurrent enrollment in SPANISH 328 AND Major or Minor in Spanish.

SPANISH 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

SPANISH 485. Study Abroad:Spain and Latin America. 3-15 Credits.

Students register for this course before departing. Upon return to U.S. they must submit course descriptions and written evaluations from their professors, together with a formal certificate and a letter grade.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SPANISH 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.

SPANISH 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

SPANISH 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

SPANISH 555. Spanish and Latin American Cinema. 3 Credits.

Historical and critical introduction to the work of prominent Spanish and Latin American filmmakers and to thematic representations of Spanish and Latin American Cultures.
P: gr st.

SPANISH 638. Major Spanish and Latin American Writer(s). 3 Credits.

Study of an outstanding figure in Spanish and Latin American literatures.
P: gr st.

Theatre Courses

THEATRE 110. Introduction to Theatre Arts. 3 Credits.

The literature, elements, and artists in theatre from a process-oriented historical perspective. Includes research prior to performances, attendance at theatre performances, artist interviews and writing of performance responses.

THEATRE 128. Jazz Dance I. 1 Credit.

Introduces the beginning dance student to the techniques, theories and practice of the jazz genre.

THEATRE 131. Acting I. 3 Credits.

Develops a basic organic approach to acting technique through theatre games, vocal and physical exercises, scene work, and improvisation.

THEATRE 137. Ballet I. 1 Credit.

Development of strength, flexibility, coordination, rhythm and correct body placement as these elements pertain to the technical and stylistic demands of ballet upon the human body.

THEATRE 138. Ballet II. 2 Credits.

Continuing development of strength, flexibility, coordination, rhythm and correct body placement as these elements pertain to the technical and stylistic demands of ballet upon the human body.
P: THEATRE 137.

THEATRE 141. Period Dance Styles. 1 Credit.

An overview of folk, social, and popular dance styles from Ancient Greek to present. Styles will be discussed in their historical context and technique will be emphasized in a studio setting.

THEATRE 142. American Musical Theatre Dance. 1 Credit.

An overview of dance styles commonly used in Musical Theatre. Styles will be discussed in their historical context and technique will be emphasized in a studio setting.
P: THEATRE 161 and 228.

THEATRE 145. Modern Dance I. 1 Credit.

The use of the medium of modern dance, both technically and stylistically, to develop strength, flexibility, coordination and rhythm in the human body, leading to physical self-expression.

THEATRE 161. Tap Dance I. 1 Credit.

An introductory study of tap dancing, with emphasis on basic technique, steps, and combinations.

THEATRE 190. First Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 151 or 152; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262.

THEATRE 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

THEATRE 219. UWGB Meets NYC: New York Theatre Trip. 1 Credit.

6-day and 5-night theatre trip to New York City. An opportunity to see up to five Broadway and Off-Broadway productions in addition to art museum and theatre-related tours.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit; REC: Thea major.

THEATRE 220. Stage Management. 3 Credits.

Procedures and functions of the professional and non-professional stage manager; includes skills such as department organization, scheduling and rehearsal procedures, and communications.
P: conc enr in THEATRE 335, 336, 338 or 339.

THEATRE 221. Stagecraft. 4 Credits.

Organization and operation of theatre productions: basic scenery construction, scene shop and theatre safety.
P: conc enr in THEATRE 338.

THEATRE 222. Costume Technology. 4 Credits.

Organization and operation of theatre productions: basic costume construction and costume shop operations.
P: conc enr in THEATRE 335, 336, 338 or 339; REC: THEATRE 221.

THEATRE 223. Computer Applications for Theatre. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce/develop student proficiency in the use of VectorWorks (CAD) program in scenic and lighting applications as well as other technically-related data management and visualization software.
P: conc enr in THEATRE 335, 336, 338 or 339.

THEATRE 224. Introduction to Theatre Design. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the fundamental principles of design and their applications in the performing arts. Students will study the vocabulary and communication of design elements through research and hands-on projects.

THEATRE 228. Jazz Dance II. 2 Credits.

Continued study and execution of the style and techniques of jazz dance. Study of the styles of major choreographers in American musical theater.
P: THEATRE 128; REC: conc enroll in ballet or modern dance.

THEATRE 231. Acting II. 3 Credits.

Scene work in realistic dramas; practice in techniques of script analysis and character development.
P: THEATRE 131.

THEATRE 233. Voice for the Actor I. 3 Credits.

Introduction to principles of vocal training systems used in actor training. Provides students with a working knowledge of their vocal and physical capabilities. Work on breathing, posture, and development of warm-up procedures.

THEATRE 261. Tap Dance II. 1 Credit.

Continuation of Tap Dance I introducing more complex tap technique. Increase speed and clarity of technique, and complexity of tap combinations and dances.
P: THEATRE 161.

THEATRE 289. Second Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice I. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will also be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

THEATRE 290. Second Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice II. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will also be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 253 or 254; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

THEATRE 298. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

THEATRE 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

THEATRE 305. Audition Techniques for the Actor. 3 Credits.

Preparation of classic and contemporary monologues and scenes, professional resumes and photos; dealing with the business aspects of establishing a career as an actor.
P: THEATRE 231.

THEATRE 309. Theatre History I:Greek to Elizabethan. 3 Credits.

Theatre history and literature, from Greek to Elizabethan.

THEATRE 310. Theatre History II: 17th Century to Realism. 3 Credits.

Theatre history and literature, from 17th century to 19th century.
P: none; REC: THEATRE 309.

THEATRE 311. Theatre History III: 20th Century and Contemporary. 3 Credits.

Theatre history and literature, 20th century and contemporary.
P: none; REC: THEATRE 309 and 310.

THEATRE 321. Scene Design. 4 Credits.

Practical techniques of scene design: mechanical drawing, rendering and model building for the theatre. Develops ability to create the visual and mechanical environment to support the presentation of theatre pieces.
P: THEATRE 221, 222 and 224.

THEATRE 322. Costume Design. 3 Credits.

History of costumes as they relate to the theatre; costume design in relation to the play and the actor; study of the processes of costume design: fabric, color and line, mass and light.
P: THEATRE 224; and conc enr in THEATRE 335, 336, 338 or 339.

THEATRE 323. Stage Lighting. 3 Credits.

Aesthetic practice of design of lighting in theatrical production: composition and psychological effects of stage lighting; contemporary equipment and control systems.
P: conc enr in THEATRE 335 or 336 or 338 or 339; REC: THEATRE 221 and 222.

THEATRE 325. Stage Makeup. 3 Credits.

Principles and applications of stage makeup: materials, light and color, and character analysis.
P: conc enr in THEATRE 335, 336, 338 or 339; REC: THEATRE 221 and 222.

THEATRE 328. Jazz Dance III. 2 Credits.

Advanced study and execution of the style and technique of Jazz Dance. A study of the styles of major choreographers in the American Musical Theatre. Competence in performance is stressed.
P: THEATRE 228.

THEATRE 331. Acting III. 3 Credits.

Scene work in poetic drama and period plays; techniques of verse interpretation, research into production history and performance styles; use of appropriate movement, manners and behavior.
P: THEATRE 231; conc enr in THEATRE 335 or 336 or 338 or 339.

THEATRE 333. Voice for the Actor II. 3 Credits.

A strengthening of structural and tonal work explored in Voice for the Actor I. Introduces stage dialects, character voices, and their healthy production.
P: THEATRE 233.

THEATRE 335. Production Practicum: Crews. 1 Credit.

Crew member/staff participation in a theatre production.

THEATRE 336. Production Practicum: Performance. 1 Credit.

Performance in a theatre production.

THEATRE 338. Production Practicum: Scene Shop. 1 Credit.

Complete production work in scene shop preparation.

THEATRE 339. Production Practicum: Costume Shop. 1 Credit.

Complete production work in costume shop preparation.
P: THEATRE 222.

THEATRE 340. Dance History. 3 Credits.

Origins and chronological development of dance styles, including ballet, modern, jazz, musical theater and social dance. Major works and personalities influencing dance from aboriginal cultures to the present day.

THEATRE 351. Directing I. 3 Credits.

Theories and techniques of theatrical staging and the relationship of the director to the actors and designers. Study of script analysis and rehearsal technique.
P: THEATRE 131; and conc enr in THEATRE 335, 336, 338 or 339.

THEATRE 352. Directing II. 3 Credits.

Advanced theories and techniques of theatrical performance through staging and directing exercises.
P: THEATRE 351.

THEATRE 361. Tap Dance III. 1 Credit.

Continuation of Tap Dance II. Increase speed, clarity and complexity of technique, combinations and dances. Introduce syncopated and complex rhythms and techniques.
P: THEATRE 261.

THEATRE 364. Musical Theatre History. 3 Credits.

Cultural conflict, influence and enrichment that arise when differing traditions of the arts come into contact with musical theatre and its development.

THEATRE 389. Third Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice I. 1 Credit.

Study of literature drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement is by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

THEATRE 390. Third Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice II. 1 Credit.

Study of literature from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement by audition.
P: Conc enr in or completion of MUSIC 353 or 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

THEATRE 421. Scene Painting. 3 Credits.

A Project oriented course incorporating the tools, materials, and techniques necessary to prepare a variety of visual textures and details necessary in theatrical scenic environments. Projects include Marble, Brick, Stone, Granite, Stencils, wood, Foliage, Metallic or Glass surfaces and a large detailed Final Group Project.

THEATRE 422. Costume Crafts. 3 Credits.

Advanced instruction in special topics in costume technology, including but not limited to Millinery, Painting and Dyeing, Corsetry and Padding, Pattern Drafting and Draping, Masks, Armor, and Distressing.
P: THEATRE 221 and 222; and conc enr in THEATRE 335 or 336 or 338 or 339.

THEATRE 423. Advanced Stage Lighting. 3 Credits.

Aesthetic practice of lighting in theatrical production, emphasizing programming and analysis. Practical application of the tools used in lighting.
P: THEATRE 224 and 323; conc enr in THEATRE 335, 336, 338 or 339.

THEATRE 426. Sound for Theatre. 3 Credits.

A Project oriented course exploring the design process used for creating, selecting and editing music/sound effects for a theatrical production. Aesthetic and technical aspects of designing sound are discussed, demonstrated and realized. The course will culminate with each student creating and presenting a complete sound design for a specific script.

THEATRE 433. Vocal Specialization. 1 Credit.

Detailed production specific vocal work for special problems and/or solutions to character development and vocal production issues.

THEATRE 440. Choreography. 3 Credits.

Technical forms and applications for composition of movement. Study of rhythmic patterns and their relationships to movement, creative content, musical interpretation, projection and dynamics. Includes movement and placement for large ensembles.
P: THEATRE 228.

THEATRE 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

THEATRE 489. Fourth Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice I. 1 Credit.

Study of songs drawn from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement by audition.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

THEATRE 490. Fourth Year Applied Musical Theatre Voice II. 1 Credit.

Study of literature from music theatre repertoire. Some classical repertoire will be utilized for the study of style and the development of proper technique and mature tone. Placement by audition.
P: MUSIC 353 & 354; Conc Enr in MUS APP 261 or 262 or 461 or 462.

THEATRE 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

THEATRE 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.

THEATRE 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Urban and Regional Studies Courses

UR RE ST 100. Introduction to Urban Studies. 3 Credits.

The richness and complexity of the human experience in the modern city. Examines the city as an arena in which interrelationships between enduring human concerns and social institutions are expressed and asks how the city influences these as well as how the established institutions and concern influence the city.

UR RE ST 102. World Regions and Concepts: A Geographic Analysis. 3 Credits.

Contemporary geography, its viewpoints and methodology; geographic reality of the present-day world is analyzed through case studies using both the regional approach and systematic analysis.

UR RE ST 198. First Year Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reserved for New Incoming Freshman.

UR RE ST 201. City Life and Globalization. 3 Credits.

The course explores the effect of globalization on people, specifically on urban processes worldwide. this course is comparative in nature and will explore global processes as they challenge people living in urban areas worldwide. The course explores different survival strategies on how to make cities better for a majority of the people.

UR RE ST 205. Urban Social Problems. 3 Credits.

The course offers a basic introduction to the history, sociology, geography, economics, and politics of U.S. urban problems; examines specific problems such as jobs, housing, and public finance; and considers future prospects.

UR RE ST 210. Drawing Systems for the Designer. 3 Credits.

The theory and practical application of various drawing systems, including orthographic, axiometrics, and perspectives, and their use as aids in the design process.
P: none; REC: ART 106.

UR RE ST 216. Native American Landscapes:Imagined and Lived Spaces. 3 Credits.

The course will explore the relationship between time and space within Native American cultures. The course will compare North American indigenous landscapes and Andean indigenous landscapes.

UR RE ST 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

UR RE ST 305. Urban Politics and Policy. 3 Credits.

Structures and operations of city governments and their responses to policy issues such as education, employment, social welfare, housing, transportation, migration, racial discrimination, urban sprawl and social inequality.
P: jr st; and POL SCI 101 or UR RE ST 100.

UR RE ST 309. Urban and Regional Economics. 3 Credits.

Basic concepts in the economics of regions and urban areas, such as industrial location theory, centra place theory, land rent theory, economic base theory, and input-output analysis; applications to problems of economic development, urbanization and place prosperity.
P: ECON 203 and jr st; REC: ECON 202.

UR RE ST 310. Urban Sociology. 3 Credits.

The study of social life and population groups in the urban environment. Our concern is with the social and psychological consequences of city life and the political and economic forces which have produced the industrial and corporate cities of the present day. Other topics include theories of "community," the location of industrial and commercial areas, the distribution of racial and ethnic groups, and urban problems such as poverty, housing, and public services.
P: jr st; and UR RE ST 100 or PU EN AF 202 or POL SCI 202 or SOCIOL 202.

UR RE ST 312. Community Politics. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes the historical dimensions of community politics in the U.S. It also explores the role of grass roots social movements in shaping local politics.
P: none; REC: POL SCI 101.

UR RE ST 313. The City Through Time and Space. 3 Credits.

Analysis of human settlement and the influence of social, economic and technological change on urban structure and the aesthetic qualities of city scapes in historical and cross-cultural settings.
P: jr st; and UR RE ST 100 or 341 or GEOG 341.

UR RE ST 315. Street Gangs in America. 3 Credits.

Organization of and subculture of street gangs in American communities; differences among ethnic/racial street gangs; representation of gang identity through graffiti, tattoos, clothing, music; gang membership and wannabes.
P: SOCIOL 202 or ANTHRO 100 or UR RE ST 100.

UR RE ST 320. Cities in Cinema. 3 Credits.

This course explores the relationship between cinema and research themes in Urban Studies with an overreaching emphasis on global/world cities. These cities are the pinnacle of the global urban network and are the "hubs of economic control, production and trade, of information circulation and cultural transmission, and of political power" (The Dictionary of Human Geography). In this course, related interdisciplinary readings serve as the framework for viewing, analyzing, critiquing, and discussion urban lifestyles, political economic structures and relationships, and the built environment as portrayed in popular films.
P: None REC: UR RE ST 100.

UR RE ST 323. Asian American Communities in the United States. 3 Credits.

Review of Asian immigration to the United States; formation of ethnic communities; prejudice and discrimination against Asian groups; and current issues affecting Asian Americans.
P: jr st; and ANTHRO 100 or Hum Stud 211 or SOCIOL 202 or 203 or UR RE ST 100.

UR RE ST 324. Latino Communities in the United States. 3 Credits.

Review of Hispanic immigration to the United States; formation of ethnic communities; diversity of Hispanic ethnic groups; and current issues affecting Hispanics such as immigration policy and bilingual education.
P: jr st; and ANTHRO 100 or SOCIOL 202 or 203 or UR RE ST 100.

UR RE ST 340. Economics of Land Use. 3 Credits.

Economic relationships between humans and land. Principles governing land use and conservation and the institutional arrangements of this basic resource. Application of principles in policy-making in land valuation, taxation and zoning in the context of regional economic development.

UR RE ST 341. The City and its Regional Context. 3 Credits.

The course will focus on two main interrelated themes in urban geography. It will explore urban places as systems operating as en entity among other cities and the surrounding region. Second, it will explore social construction of urban morphology.
P: jr st.

UR RE ST 342. Community Economic Development. 3 Credits.

Various forces involved in community economic development, including the human and non human resource potentials, motivation, values and attitudes. Examines social and economic structures such as transportation, communication, and community services from the point of view of community development.
P: jr st; and ECON 202 or 203.

UR RE ST 351. Transportation and the City. 3 Credits.

The impact of the transportation subsystem of the city upon other urban subsystems (residential, commercial) and upon urban dwellers.
P: jr st; and POL SCI 101 or 202 or PU EN AF 202 or UR RE ST 100.

UR RE ST 360. GIS and the Urban World. 3 Credits.

This course applies geographic information systems (GIS) techniques to real-world urban problems in the context of pertinent theoretical foundations. It is designed to provide a background in GIS-based spatial analysis approaches and develop an understanding of the operational basis of GIS tecnology while furthering the comprehension of teh urban problems themselves.
P: GEOG 250.

UR RE ST 370. Geography of South America. 3 Credits.

A survey course which will explore the physical features, resources, people, and the political economy of the American southern hemisphere.
P: jr st; REC: ENV SCI 102 or GEOG 222.

UR RE ST 392. Analysis of South Asia. 3 Credits.

Regions of South Asian countries in various stages of development. Emphasis on the interaction of physical and human resources.
P: jr st.

UR RE ST 412. Urban and Regional Planning. 3 Credits.

Examines planning theory, focusing on models of rationality, valuation processes, political decision-making, governmental structure and fiscal policies.
P: jr st; and GEOG 102 or POL SCI 202 or PU EN AF 202 or UR RE ST 100 or 102; REC: POL SCI 101.

UR RE ST 431. Seminar in Urban and Regional Studies. 3 Credits.

A capstone course intended to promote understanding of ethics in urban and regional planning, community politics, economic development, and other areas of urban and regional studies. Scholarly and intellectual discussion of community career and volunteer opportunities. Guidance provided for preparing professional resume documentation and engaging in job search activities.
P: Ur Re St major/minor; min 100 completed credits.

UR RE ST 452. Planning Theory and Methods. 3 Credits.

Planning for public and not-for-profit agencies: theory and practical significance of planning; the political and administrative setting of planning operations; and methods of planning analysis such as strategic planning.
P: BUS ADM 215 or COMM SCI 205 or MATH 260.

UR RE ST 454. Designing Communities and Neighborhoods. 3 Credits.

The main objective of the course is to allow students to engage and critically assess design elements that create places that foster community identity addressing the vexing problems in residential, commercial, office, recreational and public areas in small cities.
P: UR RE ST 100; REC: UR RE ST 341.

UR RE ST 461. Special Topics in Urban and Regional Studies. 3 Credits.

A multi-disciplinary investigation into a special topic within urban and regional studies. Includes topics such as education, employment, housing and transportation, and urban and regional policy.
P: written cons of inst.

UR RE ST 478. Honors in the Major. 3 Credits.

P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major. (F,S)
P: min 3.50 all cses req for major and min gpa 3.75 all UL cses req for major.

UR RE ST 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

UR RE ST 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

UR RE ST 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

UR RE ST 699. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

Women's and Gender Studies Courses

WOST 205. Women in Literature. 3 Credits.

Surveys both women as writers and women as characters in literature; emphasizes the wisdom, experiences and insights of women writers and women in literature; concerned with literature from two or more cultures and comparison of the social and human values reflected in the literature of those cultures.

WOST 206. Fertility, Reproduction, and Family Planning. 3 Credits.

Factors that influence reproduction and fertility, i.e., physiological, psychological, social, cultural, and ethical; the methods available for limiting or increasing reproduction; the nature of family planning programs.
P: HUM BIOL 102 or BIOLOGY 202.

WOST 241. Introduction to Women's & Gender Studies. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary introduction to the study of gender, the influence of gender on social institutions and structures, and an examination of women's lives across the globe historically and today.

WOST 272. Women in the Performing Arts. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course examines the contributions of women in the performing arts and looks closely at the factors which constrain and further women's creativity in a variety of performing genres: dance, theater, opera, musical theater, conducting, composition, etc.

WOST 299. Travel Course. 1-4 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.

WOST 324. The Biology of Women. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the physiology of the adult female body and will address health issues that are unique to or different in women. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of female sex hormones on multiple processes (reproductive, nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular) in the body.
P: HUM BIOL 102 with at least a C grade or BIOLOGY 202 with at least a C grade.

WOST 336. Gender Development Across the Lifespan. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary analysis of changes in biological, social, and identity development for males and females throughout the life span.
P: HUM DEV 102 or Soc C D 241. REC: COMM SCI 301.

WOST 338. World Literatures. 3 Credits.

A study of selected works from world literatures. A variable content course.
P: ENGLISH 290 or concurrent enrollment, Jr st.

WOST 348. Gender and the Law. 3 Credits.

The changing legal status of women in relationship to other social forces; major historical landmarks in the development of women's legal rights and current status of such areas as property rights, family law and employment opportunity; legal tools in the struggle for equality.
P: sophomore standing.

WOST 350. Topics in Women's Studies. 3 Credits.

Explores a single theme in Women's Studies scholarship from an interdisciplinary perspective. Variable content.

WOST 360. Women and Gender in First Nations Communities. 3 Credits.

This course examines the traditional and contemporary status of First Nations women. The course focuses on the fluid definitions and constructions of gender identity before and after Euro-American contact, exploring the intersections of racism, sexism, homophobia, colonialism, globalization. Decolonization and resistance are primary themes of the course.
REC: FNS 225, FNS 226 or WOST 241.

WOST 370. History of Sexuality in the U.S.. 3 Credits.

Historical introduction to sexual behaviors and attitudes in the U.S. from the period of colonization to the present. Includes analyses of the impact of economic, racial, gender, political, and technological change on sexual norms and behaviors.
P: DJS/WOST 241 or HISTORY 205 or 206.

WOST 375. Gender and Global Justice. 3 Credits.

Debates surrounding global justice challenge us to question our obligations toward people around the world. This includes: the moral status of individuals, states and peoples; theories of human rights; the ethics of the use of force; and global inequality, poverty and distributive justice. This course will use concepts in global justice to explore the way gender norms influence women's and men's ability to access legal rights and political freedoms, to challenge legal norms and to improve social welfare.
P: cse in women's studies.

WOST 379. Women, Art and Image. 3 Credits.

Examines the impact women have made on art historically as of artists, muses, models, dealers, benefactors and critics with emphasis on images of women in visual culture, deconstructing notions of identify, others and beauty in contemporary society and in the past.
P: jr st; REC: ART 202 or WOST 241.

WOST 380. U.S. Women's History. 3 Credits.

In this course our goal is a richer understanding of women's experiences in the past, ranging from pregnancy and single motherhood to women's struggles to win the right to vote. Through lectures, discussions and films we will explore a variety of women's lives, consider the ways studying women changes our historical perspectives and focus on how interpretations of the past influence our understanding of current social issues.
P: none; REC: jr st and one cse in U.S. history, U.S. lit or Women's Studies.

WOST 401. Psychology of Women. 3 Credits.

The psychology of women examines traditional and feminist approaches to women in psychological theory and research as frameworks for understanding women's development and experience in family, academic, work, and relationship roles. The interacting influences of biology, socialization, and cultural context are considered.
P: PSYCH 102.

WOST 437. Feminist Theory. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to feminist theories from a variety of disciplinary perspectives; we will examine the development of feminist theories, their practice and contrasting viewpoints.
P: DJS 241.

WOST 497. Internship. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings.
P: jr st.

WOST 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early in the semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.

WOST 499. Travel Course. 1-6 Credits.

Travel courses are conducted to various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. May be repeated to different locations.
P: cons of instr & prior trip arr & financial deposit.