2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog Academic Catalog

Connect on youtube

Military Science

http://www.uwgb.edu/militaryscience/

Reserve Officers Training Corp (ROTC) Program

Instructor – SFC Nathan Preder - Military Science Instructor
E-mail: predern@uwgb.edu; Phone: (920) 691-6562

Military science is concerned primarily with the exploration and development of leadership and management. Students who want to develop such skills pursue studies in military science in addition to their majors and minors. Students register for these courses at UW-Green Bay and the classes are conducted at St. Norbert College.

Military science consists of a core curriculum of military skills and professional knowledge integrated in both basic and advanced courses. The ultimate purpose of the program is to provide college-trained officers for the U.S. Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard. The program encourages participants to more fully develop personal qualities, including sense of duty, integrity, loyalty, respect, selfless service and honor, necessary for military leadership.

The program is conducted by the Reserve Officers Training Corp (ROTC) located at St. Norbert College. Completion of the advanced ROTC courses and a baccalaureate degree provides opportunities for full- or part-time careers as officers in the U.S. Army, Army National Guard, or Army Reserve.

Courses

MIL SCI 101. Leadership and Military Science I. 2 Credits.

This is an introductory course designed to focus on the fundamental components of service as an officer in the United States Army. Students are familiarized with individual values, leadership traits and the fundamentals of officer ship. Students also learn "life skills" of physical fitness, communication applications, both oral and written, as well as interpersonal relationships. The lab provides basic instruction on squad movement techniques and the six-squad tactical missions of patrolling, attack, defense, ambush, reconnaissance, and squad battle drills. Additionally, students learn basic map reading, first aid, physical fitness, and military formations to include basic marching techniques.
Fall Only.

MIL SCI 102. Leadership and Military Science II. 2 Credits.

This course is an orientation to leadership theory and the fundamentals of decision-making process by learning how to solve problems and develop critical thinking skills. Students develop followership skills and the ability to learn goal-setting techniques while working in a group interaction setting. The lab continues to provide basic instruction on squad movement techniques and the six-squad tactical missions of patrolling, attack, defense, ambush, reconnaissance and squad battle drills. Students are introduced to the operations order format.
Spring.

MIL SCI 183. Military Conditioning. 1 Credit.

Students participate in the United States Army's military conditioning and fitness program designed to develop both individual fitness and the leadership skills and knowledge essential to the management of an effective organizational physical fitness program.
Fall and Spring.

MIL SCI 201. Basic Leadership and Management I. 3 Credits.

Students learn how to resolve ethical problems by applying leadership theory and principles. Students learn self-development techniques such as the importance of stress management, time management and the ability to solve problems. Lastly, students apply communication theory and skills in a leadership study focusing on problem solving. The lab applies basic leadership theory and decision making during practical exercises in a field environment. Students continue to develop basic map reading, first aid, physical fitness and military formations to include basic march techniques.
P: MIL SCI 101 and MIL SCI 102
Fall Only.

MIL SCI 202. Basic Leadership and Management II. 3 Credits.

Students focus primarily on leadership with an extensive examination of the unique purpose, roles and obligations of commissioned officers. Students also focus, in detail, on the origin of our institutional values and their practical application in the decision-making process and leadership theory. Students use case studies to learn the Army’s ethical decision-making process. The lab continues to apply basic leadership theory and decision making during practical exercises in a field environment. Students continue to develop basic map reading, first aid, physical fitness and military formations to include basic march techniques.
P: MIL SCI 101 and MIL SCI 102
Spring.

MIL SCI 301. Advanced Leadership and Management I. 4 Credits.

Students are introduced to the Leader Development Program that will be used to evaluate their leadership performance and provide developmental feedback for the remainder of their cadet years. Cadets are taught how to plan and conduct individual and small unit training, as well as basic tactical principles. Cadets will also learn reasoning skills and the military specific application of these skills in the form of the Army’s troop. The lab reinforces small unit tactical training while employing the troop leading procedure to accomplish planning and decision-making. Students continue to learn basic map reading, first aid, physical fitness and military formations to include basic march techniques.
P: MIL SCI 101, 102, 201, and 202
Fall Only.

MIL SCI 302. Advanced Leadership and Management II. 4 Credits.

The course focus is doctrinal leadership and tactical operations at the small unit level. Students are provided opportunities to plan and conduct individual and collective training for Army operations. Synthesizing training, leadership and team building is the primary focus. Upon completion, students possess the fundamental confidence and competence of leadership in a small unit setting. The lab continues reinforcing small unit tactical training while employing the troop leading procedures to accomplish planning and decision-making. Students also continue basic map reading, first aid, physical fitness and military formations to include basic march techniques.
P: Mil Sci 211, 212, 221 and 222.
Spring.

MIL SCI 401. Applied Leadership and Management I. 4 Credits.

This course concentrates on leadership, management and ethics to begin the final transition from cadet to lieutenant. Students focus on attaining the knowledge and proficiency in several critical areas they need to operate effectively as Army Officers. These areas include coordinating activities with staff, counseling theory and practice within the “Army Context,” training management and ethics. Students develop and possess the fundamental skills, attributes and abilities to operate as competent leaders in a cadet battalion. They must confidently communicate to subordinate cadets their preparedness to shoulder the responsibilities entrusted to them.
P: MIL SCI 301 and MIL SCI 302
Fall Only.

MIL SCI 402. Applied Leadership and Management II. 4 Credits.

Students learn the legal aspects of decision-making and leadership. Instruction introduces the student to the organization of the Army from the tactical to the strategic level. Students learn administrative and logistical management focusing on the fundamentals of soldier and unit level support. Practical exercises require the student, both individually and collectively, to apply their knowledge to solve problems and confront situations commonly faced by junior officers. The lab continues to sharpen the students’ leadership skills. Students normally change leadership positions to hone their skills, attributes and abilities as leaders. Again, they must confidently communicate to subordinate cadets their preparedness to shoulder the responsibilities entrusted to them.
P: MIL SCI 301 and MIL SCI 302
Spring.

MIL SCI 498. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study is offered on an individual basis at the student's request and consists of a program of learning activities planned in consultation with a faculty member. A student wishing to study or conduct research in an area not represented in available scheduled courses should develop a preliminary proposal and seek the sponsorship of a faculty member. The student's advisor can direct him or her to instructors with appropriate interests. A written report or equivalent is required for evaluation, and a short title describing the program must be sent early inthe semester to the registrar for entry on the student's transcript.
P: fr or so st with cum gpa > or = 2.50; or jr or sr st with cum gpa > or = 2.00.