Doctorate of Education, EdD

https://www.uwgb.edu/fned

The program is centered in Indigenous knowledge systems and draws upon Indigenous teaching and learning methods. The program aligns with the UW-Green Bay’s mission to provide an interdisciplinary, problem-focused educational experience that prepares students to think critically and address complex issues in a multicultural and changing world. The Ed.D. in First Nations Education enriches the quality of life for students and the community by embracing the educational value of diversity, encouraging engaged citizenship, and serving as an intellectual and cultural resource for First Nations and non-First Nations communities. In addition, the Ed.D. advances the institutional goal of improving teaching and learning with its focus on First Nations Elder epistemology and pedagogy. 

The program is practitioner focused and driven by professional and community needs. The Education Doctorate (Ed.D.) is an applied degree that addresses genuine issues and generates knowledge about First Nations. The Ed.D. in First Nations Education prepares leaders to transform institutions and promote cultural resurgence and the vitality of future generations.

The program draws students from an array of professional backgrounds including: PK-12 administrators in school districts with First Nations students, tribal college administrators and teachers, tribal education administrators, tribal social service administrators, tribal health care administrators, tribal library administration, First Nations governmental officials, tribal school district administrators, tribal career service and vocational rehabilitation administrators, tribal historians, tribal human resources administrators, and others.  

The 54-credit degree program is offered over 4 years. The degree consists of a set of core courses offered primarily in face to face settings, reflecting the oral tradition. Classes are offered on weekends with limited online delivery to accommodate working professionals. Students enter the program in a cohort and work collaboratively in classes during the first two years of the program, including summer. Two classes (6 credits) in the program are shared, on-line courses offered through the UW System Ed.D. Cooperative. Students complete the degree with a culminating applied dissertation project in years three and four. The dissertation project is developed in collaboration with First Nations governments, communities, and individuals. It is a scholarly project that impacts the Tribal World.

More information, admission requirements, required application materials and applications are on the UW-Green Bay Graduate Studies website.

Admissions Applications for the Ed.D. in First Nations Education has three parts: 

Part One - Electronic Application: 

Applicants must complete an electronic application for admissions.  You can access it here: https://apply.wisconsin.edu/ 
Once you begin the electronic application process, you will complete the following (A & B) in the electronic application:  

  1. Master's degree from a regionally accredited institution (will consider applicants with a bachelor's degree who demonstrates an equivalent of 4 or more years of learning from oral scholars or knowledge bearers.)
  2. Application Fee: The non-refundable application fee is $56 if you are applying to a degree program. Applicants pay the application fee in the online electronic application. Applicants may also send a check or U.S. money order to UW Green Bay Office of Graduate Studies (address below).  
  3. Application Written Statements: The Ed.D. in First Nations Education requires all applicants to submit two writing statements in support of their application to the program: 
    • personal statement of intent (800-1000 words)
    • statement of scholarly interests (1200-1500 words). 

Part Two - Additional Admissions Requirements Submitted Directly to UW Green Bay Office of Graduate Studies:

Submit the following items to: UW Green Bay, Graduate Studies Office, 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay, WI 54311-7001 or gradstu@uwgb.edu: 

  1. Post-Secondary/Graduate Transcripts:  
    • Official transcripts must be submitted from every post-secondary school attended by the applicant.
    • Official “course-by-course” transcript evaluations from either Education Services Evaluators (ECE) or World Education Services (WES) are required for all school attended outside of the US.  The transcript evaluation must be sent to the Office of Graduate Studies directly from the company issuing the evaluation.  Transcripts or transcript evaluations sent from applicants are not considered official and will not be accepted.
    • If you have attended UW-Green Bay, we can provide this transcript for your application file.  There is no need to request it.
    • If you have attended UW-Green Bay within the last 5 years and your post-secondary transcripts are on file, we will not ask you to resend them.
  2. Résumé:
    • Applicants must send an updated résumé (2 page maximum) via email attachment to the UW-Green Bay Graduate Studies Office at: gradstu@uwgb.edu.  In cases of low GPA or professional experience that does not clearly relate to the Ed.D. in First Nations Education program, the admission committee may request additional information in support of an application.
  3. References:
    • Applicants are required to submit three letters of evaluation.  The name of each reference must be included on the UW-System on-line application. References must submit their letters directly via email attachment to the UW-Green Bay Graduate Studies Office atgradstu@uwgb.edu.  The Graduate Studies Office will update the Application Checklist upon receipt of each letter of evaluation.  Please allow 2-3 business days for the system to be updated.  Applicants are responsible to ensure that all references have completed and submitted their letters by the application deadline.

Part Three - On-Campus Interview and Essay:

Candidates under consideration for admission are required to complete

  1. An on-campus oral interview and
  2. An on-campus written essay.

Both will be conducted with the First Nations Education doctoral admission committee. Both the interview and essay portions of the admissions process will take place in-house on the UW Green Bay campus. The committee will notify applicants with regard to the scheduling of dates and times.  

Required Foundations Courses21
Introduction to Indigenous Education
Ancestral Leadership Ways of Leadership
Indigenous Pedagogy
Generational Healing
Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations of Leadership in Education
Critical Analysis of Systemic Inequity: Social Justice Education
First Nations Law and Policy
First Nations Research and Assessment12
Indigenous Inquiry
Relational Assessment
Grant Writing
Qualitative Research Methods
Program Evaluation
Statistics Lab
Comprehensive Exam
Upon completion of 33 credits of First Nations Education coursework (not including the elective credits) students must pass one individual written comprehensive exam and one cohort oral comprehensive exam.
Area of Emphasis or Approved Elective Class 13
Dissertation Applied Project18
Dissertation Project Seminar: Relational Knowledge and Praxis (9 credits required)
Upon completion of 9 credits of dissertation seminar, student must successfully defend a written dissertation project proposal.
Dissertation Project (9 credits required)
Upon completion of the dissertation project, studet must pass a public oral defense.
Total Credits54
Plan of Study Grid
First Year
FallCredits
FNED 800 Introduction to Indigenous Education 3
FNED 801 Ancestral Leadership Ways of Leadership 3
 Credits6
Spring
FNED 804 Indigenous Pedagogy 3
FNED 820 Critical Analysis of Systemic Inequity: Social Justice Education 3
 Credits6
Summer
FNED 805 Generational Healing 3
FNED 807 Indigenous Inquiry 3
 Credits6
Second Year
Fall
FNED 810 Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations of Leadership in Education 3
FNED 825 Relational Assessment 2
FNED 826 Grant Writing 1
 Credits6
Spring
FNED 830 First Nations Law and Policy 3
Elective 3
Individual written comprehensive exam  
Cohort oral comprehensive exam  
 Credits6
Summer
FNED 831 Qualitative Research Methods 2
FNED 832 Program Evaluation 2
FNED 834 Statistics Lab 2
 Credits6
Third Year
Fall
FNED 898 Dissertation Project Seminar: Relational Knowledge and Praxis 3
 Credits3
Spring
FNED 898 Dissertation Project Seminar: Relational Knowledge and Praxis 3
 Credits3
Summer
FNED 898 Dissertation Project Seminar: Relational Knowledge and Praxis 3
 Credits3
Fourth Year
Fall
FNED 899 Dissertation Project 3
 Credits3
Spring
FNED 899 Dissertation Project 3
 Credits3
Summer
FNED 899 Dissertation Project 3
 Credits3
 Total Credits54

Steps Toward the Degree

1.     Student applicant is admitted to the doctoral program.

2.     In year three, after completion of 33 credits of coursework (not including elective credits), student enrolls in FNED 898 Dissertation Project Seminar. 

a.     Student successfully completes an individual comprehensive written exam.

b.     Student successfully completes an all-cohort comprehensive oral exam.

c.     Student successfully completes a dissertation project proposal. 

A student will be assigned a committee chair after completion of the oral and written comprehensive exams.  A student will begin creating the rest of the committee while they are writing the dissertation proposal. All committee members will be in place after the dissertation proposal is approved, in year three. The FNED Dissertation Committee Composition will consist of 3 members required, with 4 committee member maximum: 

  • Committee Member 1, Committee Chair: is assigned to student by the FNED faculty (required)
  • Committee Member 2, FNED faculty member with an earned doctorate (required)
  • Committee Member 3, Must be one of the following (required):      
  • ​Indigenous oral scholar or knowledge bearer
  • academic scholar
  • professional/practitioner from the field
  • community partner
  • Optional Member 4, may be one of the following:​​​​
    • Indigenous oral scholar or knowledge bearer
    • academic scholar
    • professional/practitioner from the field
    • community partner​​

The dissertation committee chair funding model was proposed and approved by HLC. Committee members oversee dissertation projects as a part of their credit load. 

A student will be assigned a committee chair after completion of the oral and written comprehensive exams, in year three of the program.  A student will begin creating the rest of the committee while they are writing the dissertation proposal in year three. All committee members will be in place after the dissertation proposal is approved in year three. 

3.  Student enrolls in FNED 899 Dissertation Project

               a. Student successfully completes a dissertation project including the dissertation oral defense.

4. Dissertation advisor files the Approval of Dissertation Project Defense Form with the Office of Graduate Studies.

5. Degree is awarded and graduate receives diploma. 

The faculty in the Ed.D. in First Nations Education represent a wide range of teaching, practice, and research experiences. Both oral traditional and academic scholars collaborate and co-teach classes together. The oral traditional scholars provide an experience in listening, observing, doing, and inquiring that fits within indigenous cultural contexts. This offers students an opportunity to experience learning in traditional First Nations approaches. Contact information and biographies for faculty and staff are available on the program website at www.uwgb.edu/fned